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October 11, 1970 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-11

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 11, 1970

,*

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, October 11, 1970

music
Contemporary concert disappointing

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By JOE PEHRSON
The Composition Department
of the School of Music offered
the first series of contemporary
Directions Concerts last night at
Rackham Aud. Unfortunately,
the quality of the compositions
presented in this concert was
somewhat questionable a n d
most of the material lacked any
real musical interest.
The first composition present-
ed on the program, Divertimien-
to, by Peter Phillips sounded
like poorly crafted and concep-
tually vacuous Bartok.
The incongruity of physically
produced sounds-finger snap-
ping and instrument pounding
-with the musical material,
which was at least 20 years ear-
lier in concept was amazing.
I find it hard to believe any
composition of such negligable
quality would ever be presented
at a Rackham concert.
Before the concert, I had
looked forward to the perform-
ance of Nexus 16, by Loren Rush.
The structure of this piece is
interesting and I was fortunate
to get a glance at the percussion
score before the presentation.
The most interesting part of

this piece is the form. The con-
ductor, Sidney Hodkinson, in-
dicated particular increments of
time with a clock-like motion
of each extended arm.
The form was interesting, but
there was little to fill the struc-
ture-this piece had two distinct
possibilities:,
1. A content which could have
evolved from a textural blend,
a description in texture or,
2. The opportunity for the au-
dience to perceive individual
sounds.
Rush's piece failed miserably
on both accounts.
The separate sounds were not
distinct, and could not be per-
ceived as separate entities. On
the other hand, the lack of defi-
nition, which could be inter-
preted as an attempt at tex-
tural blend, never evolved and
one was left with the impression
that Rush attempted to blend
two musical forms that could
never be reconciled.
Requiems for the Party Girl
by R. Murray Shafer, is a piece
which rivals Phillip's for its
incongruity.
This piece strives for a par-
ticularly trite gendre of art

which combines post-Webern
serialism with a shallow attempt
at "camp." The soprano, Phyllis
Mailing, attempts vocal suicide
on stage. Shafer trys to blend
this "pop" gendre with a music
which seems essentially stag-
nant - separate phrases joined
by commas. This is another
piece ° which should have been
intercepted some time before
the program.
One comment on the general
structure of the Contemporary
Directions concerts. The con-
certs, in form, are far behind
the types of new expression of-
fered by the Composers.
Whether the performers care
to believe this or not, there is a
definite amount of energy, en-
ergy which could, be properly
channeled into the actual pro-
duction of music, which goes
into the presumptuous nature of
the performer - audience situa-
tion.
By appearance, the perform-
ers should be expected to attend
a funeral shortly after the,
presentation.
Fortunately, there were two
compositions of interest which
made it to this program. One

was the excellent Improvisa-
tions sur Mallarme by P i e r r e
Boulez.
Boulez really does understand
the nature of musical expres-
sion. His sounds are well-plac-
ed, in meaningful sequence, and
always in accord with the syntax
of his language.
The soprano, Phyllis Mail-
ing, was excellent and usually
precise in locating pitch. Some
sounds, particularly the vacuum-
like piano-celeste combinations,
were amazing, but somehow
Boulez is always capable of
maintaining the pace he sets at
the beginning of each piece. The
sounds are beautiful when sep-
arate, but everything works
togetherbin conceptual unity.
The final piece on the pro-
gram, Three Mosquitoes find
they are reunited after a con-
vention in Atlantic City, New
Jersey by Elliot Borishansky was
equal in quality and perform-
ance to the Boulez piece, and
considerably more contempor-
ary as well.
This piece is a theatre piece,
and the expression takes visual
as well as aural form.

Three mosquitoes, in the form
of trumpets, proceed on stage
and mix visual acrobatics with
a well-crafted and humorous
musical blend.
Shortly before the conclus-
ion, the trumpets assume their
normal functions, only to grind
out a trite and washed-out seg-
ment of tonality. Borishansky,
we get your point. Out of sight.
--.-- -- -

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By JUDY KAHN
Avenues through which dis-
crimination againstfemale stu-
dents, faculty and staff can be
fought were -discussed Yesterday
during workshop of the Univer-
sity's Teach-in on Women.
Legal means were cited as the
most productive for achieving an
end to discrimination. however,
Jean King, co-leader of the work-
shop warned that while many
laws, including the Fourteenth
Amendment, have been enacted,
Womlen talk
on seX role
By SHARI COHEN
Problems of identity, marriage
and sex roles were discussed yes-
terday at two Women's Teach-In
workshops which attracted over
130 women.
Participants in both groups,
"Sisters Rising" and "Unattached
Women" expressed concern about
achieving a personal identity.
"We. don't feel there is legiti-
macy to the term 'unattached wo-
men,' This implies unattached to
a man - women's existence de-
fined in terms of men," said Di-
ane Ehrensaft, Grad.
Marriage was criticized as being
a determinant of identity. "You're
raised with the idea that you're
not anybody until you're married.
I'm not convinced that unmarried
men have identities as people
either," said Susan Hitchcock,
Grad.
Various alternatives to marriage
a n d monogamous relationships
were discussed. Another partici-
pant thought it was possible to be
"free enough and happy enough
with your own life" without in-
volvement in such a relationship.
Several women favored com-
munal living as an alternative to
traditionalrrelationships, claiming
that it prevented loneliness but
was not restrictive.
"I think being mature means.
dealing with that loneliness. At-
tachment won't necessarily satisfy
the loneliness all the time," said
Joan Swartz, a teacher from Bay
City.'
In both groups, the men present
were asked to leave so that the
women would feel more free to
speak.
I think if one sister wants them
to leave, they should leave," ex-
plained one woman.
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the lack of strict enforcement of
these laws has severely hampered
their effectiveness in preventing
sex discrimination.
T h e fourteenth Amendment
guarantees equal protection under
the law for all citizens, regardless
of sex and other factors.
Efforts are presently under way
in Congress to include universities
under title seven of the 1964 Civil
Rights Act, which guarantees
equal employment, regardless of
sex, said Kathy Shortridge, work-
shop co-leader.
Because the University has fed-
eral contracts, it is open to review
by the federal government, and
must comply to federal non-dis-
crimination rulings.
On a more local level, King sug-
gested bringing cases of sex dis-
crimination before the state Civil
Rights Commission. The Human
Relations Commission is another
possible avenue of redress, al-
though no one has brought a case
before it regarding alleged Uni-
versity sexism, King said.
The civil rights division of the
Health, Education and Welfare
department will soon issue a .e-
p o r t regarding discriminating
against women by the University.
It is the first such report to be
made, she said.
The "basic problem" in fighting
sex discriminatioin is that women
are-with good reason-afraid to
complain or bring legal action
against discriminators, King said.
Preventing discrimination at the
graduate school level is complicat-
ed by anticipation of discrimina-
tion and other factors which pre-
vent women from applying in the
first place in numbers equal to,
men.
Julia Wrigley, '71, cited the need
for women to organize effectively
to bring about an end to discrimi-
nation. It is hard to create change
as an individual, she said.
King said a priority concern
should be organization by women:
to introduce women's studies cour-
ses into the University's course
curriculum.

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