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October 04, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-04

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ENDS TODAY - 2:30, 4:15, 6:00, 7:45, 9:30
Is Buue1sI V sftepieCe o| 0tiCa /

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page three
Sunday, October 4, 1970

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Mit i iMa

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

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"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST!"
-N.Y. Times-Saturday Review-Cue Magazine
"ONE OF BUNUEL'S BEST!"
-Harper's
"A catalogue of erotic obsessions!"
-Newsweek
SF PTH Por'um]
____________________ IPYM AVUNUE AT UUEWVY I
OOWITOWNANN ARBO
INFORMATION 761-9700
STARTS MONDAY
"AN IMMENSELY ROMANTIC MOVIE WITH
STYLE AND CRITICAL INTELLIGENCE. 'The
Virgin And The Gypsy' is satisfying because it realizes
its goals!" -Vincent Canby, N.Y. Times
"A BEAUTIFUL AND ENGROSSING FILM.
NOTHING SHORT OF MASTERLY. PURE
PLEASURE. Fascinating story of the sensitive and sen-
sual Yvette. Joanna Shimkus has brought her to vivid
and memorable life in a performance that reveals her
remarkable talent. She blends the rebelliousness and
romanticism of girlhood with the conviction and imag-
mation of young womanhood." -Judith Crist, New York Magazine
"A finely made film. All the details delight-the finely
etched portrait of the quiet renegade girl, played with
erotic daydreams in her eyes by Joanna Shimkus; Franco
Nero's snake-eyed gypsy, all purpose and passion."
Newsweek Magazine
"No story-and no film-better reveals Lawrence's moral
absolutism than The Virgin and the Gypsy'. Between
its boundaries is sown the seed of the Lawrentian canon
-the familial conventions, the social hypocrisies, the
annealing force of sex. An exemplary cast." -Time Magazine
G.GHMgAweces
THE VIRGIN AND THE GYPSY

news briefs
By The Associated Press
THE UNITED STATES has sent $168 million in military aid
to Greece while publicly proclaiming a selective arms embargo
against her military rulers.
In secret Senate testimony, made public today, State and De-
fense department officials said the embargo was lifted after the
Soviet invasion in Czechoslovakia. The Greek colonels were given
$28 million in planes, artillery shells and coastal minesweepers.
However, the officials insisted the colonels had received no tanks
or heavy equipment suitable for dealing with anti-government mobs.
The U.S. last month lifted the embargo on heavy arms, resuming
full aid to Greece. This freed $56 million in jet planes, helicopters
and tanks held since after the colonels ousted King Constantine
in April 1967.
SEN. CHARLES E. GOODELL (R-NY) yesterday accused
Vice-President Spiro T. Agnew of "attacking the very basis ofj
democracy." He said Agnew may be more dangerous than the late
Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy.
Speaking on the Metromedia Radio News program "Profile,",
Goodell said: "Mr. Agnew's attacks on me and others in the party,
has clearly signaled that as far as he's concerned, he wants this party
to turn hard right."
In Minot, S.D., and Salt Lake City last Wednesday, Agnew de-
scribed Goodell as a radical liberal, said the senator "has left his
party," and declared he does not support Goodell's election to the
seat he now holds by appointment.
THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION will propose legislation
early next year to require certification and long-range regional
planning of electric utility construction.
The four-part program is "for resolving the apparent conflict
between power needs and environmental protection." It includes:
-"Long-range planning of utility expansions on a regional basis'
at least 10 years ahead of construction."
-"Participation in the planning of th environmental protection;
agencies and notice to the public of plant sites at least six years in
advance of construction."
-Review and approval of proposed large power facilities by a
public agency.
-"An expanded program of research and development."
VIET CONG FORCES are apparently massing for new attacks
on the outer defense ring of Phnom Penh, a Cambodian military
spokesman said yesterday.
Cambodian fighter-bombers attacked a Viet Cong troop concen-
tration 14 miles north of the city yesterday. At the same time, a third
battalion of government troops struck at a a roadblock between
Phnom Penh and the nation's only deepwater port at Kompong som.
The Cambodians are expected to press for increased military
help from the U.S. at talks today with Adm. John S. McCain, com-
mander of all U.S. forces in the Pacific.
A U.S. Embassy source said the commander would not make
new U.S. commitments.

Heath, Nixon to
seek lengthened
By The Associated Press
At a conference in London, President Nixon and Prime
Minister Edward Heath agreed yesterday to work for a 90-day
extension of the Middle East cease-fire. Meanwhile in Wash-
ington, the United States received assurances from Egypt's
interim government that it will continue the policy of the
late President Nasser in seeking negotiated settlement of the
conflict with Israel.
In a related development yesterday, King Hussein's army
and Palestinian guerrillas agreed to release all their prison-
ers held since the civil war in Jordan last month. Amman

-Associated Press
AN INMATE of New York Queens House of Detention speaks his
grievances at a news conference yesterday while Rep. Shirley
Chisolm (D-NY) listens.
Prtisoners continue
riots, hold hostages.

NEW YORK (A") - Prisoners
demanding swifter trials, lower
bail and improved conditions
rioted yesterday in the Brook-
lyn House of Detention, the
fourth city jail to be hit by re-
volts since Thursday.
The Brooklyn inmates seized
four guards, boosting the total
number of hostages in the four
jails to 27. All were reported
unharmed.
Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller
called the prisoner revolt an ex-
ample of "revolutionary new
problems" requiring "revolution-
ary changes in the system."
Windows were smashed and
debris hurled from the windows
in all four jails.
In Brooklyn, a guard captain
said tear gas was used in all
cellblocks except the one on the
fifth floor, where the three hos-
tages were held by 240 prison-
ers. The modern, 10-story jail
holds 1,500 persons, about dou-
ble its originally intended ca-
pacity.
Police said several guards and
some inmates were hurt inside
and a fireman was injured by
a crowd that gathered outside
the prison in downtown Brook-
lyn.
A number of people in the
crowd were arrested, some for
throwing missiles from rooftops
at police who surrounded the
prison. The windows of a news-
paper radio car were smashed
a block from the jail.

After Rockefeller's interven-
tion, two state judges entered
the century-old Long Island
City Jail in Queens yesterday,
where the riots had begun on
Thursday, to hold on-the-spot
bail review hearings. Five hos-
tages were being held there.
R e p. Adam Clayton Powell,
(D-N.Y.), was denied admission
to the Queens facility because,
officials said, there wasn't space
inside.
Raising a clenched f i s t to-
ward the red brick jail's win-
dows, Powell yelled, "Don't give
up one inch! Keep up this
fight!"
Herman Badillo, Puerto Rico-
born congressional aspirant and
R e p. Shirley Chisholm, black
congresswoman from Brooklyn,
went to the Long Island City
jail at the request of the pris-
oners to help resolve the situa-
tion.
Badillo said he thought their
complaints had merit.
"For instance, when a man is
on welfare, to set a bail of $5,-
000 is tantamount to keeping
him in prison pending trial," he
said.
The only threatened jailbreak
during the riots occurred Friday
night at the Queens House of
Detention in Kew Gardens.
Guards used smoke bombs to
prevent 800 prisoners f r o m
breaking through doors into the
Criminal Courts building.

radio reported.
Premier Bahi Ladgham of'
man Arab Peace Committee
in Jordan, said that under a
disengagement p1 a n to pre-
vent another civil war, forces
of the two sides have already
withdrawn from the capital,
Amman, and from war-rav-
aged cities in the north.
Within the next few days they
will complete second stage of the
plan by taking up positions along
the cease-fire line with Israel, he
said.
In Cairo yesterday, thousands
of Egyptians tramped through the
streets shouting slogans denounc-
ing Israel, but they continued to
mourn the death of President Ga-
mal Abdel Nasser.
Premier Alexei N. Kosygin left
Cairo for Moscow after admonish-
ing Egyptian leaders to stand by
the U.S. initiated peace plan for
the Middle East and the 90-day
cease-fire, the authoriative news-
paper Al Ahram reported.
A joint Soviet-Egyptian com-
munique published later in Mos-
cow said the two countries intend
to "continue pooling and coor-
dinating efforts aimed at a settle-
ment of the Middle East conflict."
It added that the Soviet Union
and Egypt "again reaffirmed the
need for the earliest elimination
of the consequences of Israeli ag-
gression and establishment of a
lasting peace in the Middle East
for all people of that area."
Lebanese newspapers in stories
from Cairo said Nasser's heirs are
discussing a Soviet-type "Troika"
-or three-member leadership-to
avoid a power struggle.
The three probably will be se-
lected from what the newspapers
called "The post-N a s s e r top
seven."
In another disclosure, Al Ahram
reported that before Nasser's
death Egypt had asked the United
States to guarantee that Israel
would not attack the missile sites
in Egypt during the cease-fire.
The paper said the United States
did not reply orexplain its stand.

Tunisia, who heads the three-
War curbs
extremism
in1 Jordan
AMMAN, Jordan (P) - Jordan's
civil war has curbed the extrem-
ists of both sides, a spokesman for
the Palestine guerrilla movement
declared yesterday.
He gave an assurance that Arab
guerrillas intend to keep the peace
in Jordan and denied they sought
to overthrow the regime of King
Hussein.
"Those who speak of taking
power cannot do so because they
do not have the force," said the
spokesman, who is a member of
Al Fatah, the guerrilla organiza-
tion.
Hisremark was an obvious ref-
erence to the Popular Front 'for
the Liberation of Palestine, the
Marxist guerrilla group led by Dr.
George Habash, which has declar-
ed that it aims to topple the mon-
archy in Jordan. The front hi-
jacked three Western airlines last
month.
As a result of the war, the front
is more ready to cooperate with
moderates among the guerrilla
movement, suggested the spokes-
man.
At the same time, extremists in
the Jordan army also have be-
come more reasonable said t h e
spokesman.
"They now accept that liquid-
ation of the revolution is impos-
sible," he added.
The spokesman reported strict
orders have gone out to the guer-
rillas to avoid differences with the
army; pointing out t h a t "both
sides are interested in peace."
"We shall continue to coexist
with the Jordan government be-
cause we want to have the lives
of the civilians," said the spokes-
man. "This is very dear to us."

,
'K -

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STUDENT
RATES
4c to
2c
Econocopy
1217 S. Univ.
761-0087

La Sociedad Hispanica
PRESENTS THE MOVIE
"THIS STRANGE PASSION"
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1970
Auditorium A, Angell Hall
' (English subtitles)
Showings 7 and 9 75c Admission

BEAK 4:
STEAK .
, HOUSE N

STEAK DINNERS
NOW SERVING
At Reasonable Prices
FILET--.59
SIRLOIN-1.53
Above Includes
Baked Potato, Salad,
and Texas Toast
STEAKBURGER-.79
includes baked potato and
Texas Toast
217 S. STATE ST.
Next to State Theater

We Don't Say Our Receivers Are The Greatest...
The Critics Do!

SINGLE SHOWS ON SALE

1

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"H gh pe~ o ma ce an a a un an e ffeatutes"

e.aed with featue

TOMORROW!

Ann Arbor Civic Theatre's
MAN OF LA MANCHA
to be presented December 17-20
-TRY-OUTS-
OCTOBER 1 & 2, 7:00 P.M. TO 11:00 P.M.
OCTOBER 4, 2:00 P.M-5:00 P.M.
Parts for 19 men, 5 women-
Bring music for a show tune and be dressed to move
201 Mulholland-Workshop Bldg.

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bes7 by -ig =deltyeqipen"
The afaytte R-150TA tere Reciver Accaime
TimeandTim Agin y LedinInepeden MaARiE. OP
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Ann Arbor

662-9405

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SAT.-SUN., OCT. 3-4
THE RED DESERT
dir. MICHAELANGELO ANTONIONI (1964)
Monica Vitti, wife of a wealthy Milan
industrialist, goes crazy. She has noth-
ing to do but display herself as a wife/
mother and take a lover.

~~cocomplte C
cam- ~ S e a tnm3

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