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October 04, 1970 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-04

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 4, 1970

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

cinema:

I

Superceding

Europe in

3y BRUCE MOCKING
The first of two parts.
The New York Film Festival,
so t h e Festival propaganda
booklet boasts, is the only
claim this country has to any
really decent film showcase on
a par with Cannes or Berlin or
Venice. After having seen four
of the major entries in t h i s
year's competition, in Septem-
ber, this appears to have been
quite an understatement. As far
as I am concerned this is the
best film festival in the world.
Opening night marked the
American debut of Truffaut's
latest film, The Wild Child, and
Philharmonic Hall, as might
well be expected, was entirely
sold out. For some perverse rea-
son I had not purchased a tick-
et in advance, a n d I arrived
amidst t h e crowd at Lincoln
Center's box office full of pes-
simism yet resolved to get in.
Fortunately, after a complex
deal involving no less than four
last-minute ticket buyers a n d
sellers I managed to -get hold
of one of the best possible seats.
Lincoln Center is one of the
outstanding locations for a film

Truffaut's 'Wild Child'

festival. Its two theatres c a n
handle typical festival crowds of
nearly t h r e e thousand people
without making patrons feel
they're on a New York subway.
The seat numbering system is so
rational it's nearly idiot-proof,
something sorely deficient in
most theatres. Above all t h e

}

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Day Calendar
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4
University Symphony Band: Wm. D.1
Revelli, conductor and John Mohler,4
guest clarinetist: Hill Aud., 3:30 p.m.1
MONDAY, OCTOBER 5
Representatives from the Law school
of Syracuse Univ. will meet with stu-
dents interested in the study of law, in1
1017 Angeli Hall, 4 p.m.
Physics Colloquium: J. Mice( B. An-
'hony, "Backward Inelastic Scattering
of Pions," P & A Colloq. Rm., 4 p.m._
General Notices
Local chapter of the American As-
sociation of University Professors will:
meet at 8:00 p.m., Oct. 7, in Con-
ference Ur., Rkacham Bldg. Speakers
will be Prof. H. Levinson, J DeMent
(Oakland), J.Frederick, C. Eggerten,
and C. Rebmus, on the topic, "Pros and
Cons of Collective Bargaining in High-
er Education with Special Refence to
the University of Michigan Faculty."
Notice to Employees of All University
Uunits: Open Enrollment Period for
Blue Cross. Blue Shield and M a J 0 r
Medical Health Insurance will be Oc-E
tober 5-18, 1970 in locations noted:I
Campus, Office of Staff Benefits, 1058
LS&A; Medical Center. Office of Staff
Benefits, A7030 Hap. New applications
and changes to existing contracts may
be made without evidence of insur-
ability. Family members, eligible for
coverage, may be added at this time,
including those unmarried children
over 19 but not yet 25. No new applica-1
tions, changes, or additions will be
accepted after open enrollment periodt
other than for new employees or1
normal changes in existing contracts £
made within the allowable 30-day per-
iod. Next Open Enrollment Period will
not be until Oct. of 1971.t
Woodrow Wilson Fellowships: Nom-
inations for Woodrow Wilson Fellow-
ships and Designates for first year
graduate work leading to career in col-
lege teaching, due Oct. 31. Only faculty
members may nominate candidates.
Eligible for nomination are men and
women of outstanding ability who are
seniors, or graduates not now enrolled
in a graduate school, or graduates now
in the armed forces who, will be free
to enter a graduate school in 1969-70,
Seniors who next semester will be
double enrolled in Literary College and
in Graduate School are eligible. To
give nominees sufficient time to pre-
pare and submit required credentials,
faculty members are urged to send in
nominations early as possible, al-
though letters postmarked October 31
will be accepted.
Letters of nomination should include
student's dfiel of cohcentration, his
local address and telephone, and should
be sent to Professor David Anderson,
Physics Department, Oberlin College,
Oberlin, Ohio, 44074. Seniors inter-
ested in advanced study and a teach-
ing career whose academic perform-
ance merits nomination for Woodrow
Wilson fellowships may consult the
campus representative, Prof. M o r r i s
Greenhut, 1616 Haven.
Placeme ant Service
3200 S.A.B.
Interviews held at Placement Services,
3200 SAB, call 763-1363 for appts., see
bulletin for requirements.
Oct. 6: Univ. of Mich Program in
Health Planning, N. Y. U. graduate
school; Oct. 7: Prudential Insurance;
Oct. 8: General Foods, Mead Johnson,
DANCE OF
INDIA
CLASSES START
WED., 7 P.M.
for 10 weeks
Information:
665-2383r 662-5804 A
A Fresh Idea
In Communication
CHAUTAUQUA
ARRIVES

Oct. 12: Aetna Life and Casualty, N. Y.
U. Grad. School of Business; Oct. 13:
Dept. of State, Univ. of Chicago School
of Business, Radio Corporation of
Americe; Oct. 14, IBM Corp, Proctor
and Gamble; Oct. 15: Chicago Payment
Gtr., Soc. Security Admin., IBM Corp.,
Minnesota Fabrics; Oct. 16: Dunn and
Bradstreet.
Latin American & Caribbean Profes-
sional Internships in Buc. & Pub. Ad-
min.: Reps. at School of Bus. Ad.
Placement office, Rm 69, Oct. 6, 4-5
p.m., Mr. James Gould. MBA & MPA
candidates or professionals employed in
these areas for no more than 3 years.
Other internships in areas of agric. sci.,
dev. educ., engrg. & lib. sci.
Army Material Command has project-
ed 1971 entry level demtnd as follows:
900 procurement, supply management
types (any degree), 349 engrs., a ri d
scientists. Davenport, Iowa regional
office indicates a .85 plus FSEE score
min. or the larger demand; engrs. and
scientists not required to take FSEE.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

-- 41

acoustics are tremendous a n d
every seat has a clear view of
the screen.
Opening night in Philhar-
monic H a 11 began in typical
welcome - to - the - convention
fashion with speeches by Wil-
liam May and Martin Siegel,
the chairman and president of
the Film Society of Lincoln
Center, sponsor of the Festival.
Next on the agenda was a wel-
coming speech by Mayor Lind-
say, who surprised the hell out
of me by getting a tremendous
ovation. I suppose the audience
liked what he had done for film
and the arts more than what he
had failed to do about the prob-
lems of New York City. T h e
highlight of his speech was a
joke about Catherine Deneuve:
"They don't make girls like her
anymore . . . and neither do I."
With all due regard for the
Mayor, a man I deeply admire,
the high point of the Festival
came shortly after he walked
off. the stage, and Truffaut
emerged. Francois T r u f f a u t
himself, a god descended from
Olympus to allow mortals to
gaze on him for a brief moment.
He didn't say much except to
tie his inability to speak Eng-
lish to the plight of the boy in

his film, but his mere presence
was sufficient to awe what
must have b e e n one of the
world's most sophisticated au-
diences. He received a thunder-
ous standing ovation when he
came on stage and another
when he left. Still another high-
light came following the film
when a spotlight revealed Truf-
faut seated with the live, real,
true Catherine Deneuve. The
applause redoubled, as did libi-
do.
The ovation was especially
well deserved that night, f o r
Wild Child is one of Truffaut's
masterpieces ranking with Jules
and Jim and The 400 Blows. To
a certain degree, Wild Child re-
sembles 400 Blows. For one
thing, it is dedicated to Jean-
Pierre Leaud, the great French
actoi w h o played 400 Blows'
Antoine Doinel. For another, it
is in black and white, attempt-
ing to get at a similar kind of
mood. But the basic problems,
the basic themes. are markedly
different. While 400 -Blows tried
to show the transformation of
a boy to a man, The Wild Child
must show something infinitely
more difficult: the transforma-
tion of an animal into a boy.
The child here has lived in a
forest all his life and is totally
unable to communicate, let
alone cope with the human
world. In small quiet scenes of
the doctor. played by Truffaut
himself, trying to make contact
with the boy and then trying to
teach him basic skills, we learn
much about our own humanity
and our own abilities to com-
municate. really communicate
with another.
The acting, especially import-
ant in a film such as this, is
excellent. Truffaut, of course, is
not as good at acting as he is
at directing. but he still man-
ages to give a very solid per-
formance. Jean-Pierre Cargol
deserves special praise as the
wild boy, a role exceedingly dif-
ficult because it lies so far be-
yond normal experience.
All of Truffaut's films a r e
well paced, but this one is es-
pecially so. Typical narrative

form has been modified so
that the film becomes a series
of vignettes demonstrating, in
brief, occasional scenes, t h e
development of the relationship
between the doctor and the boy.
The vignettes are tied together
through a number of rather cle-
ver devices; narration from the!
doctor's diary (the film is based
on Doctor Itard's actual journ-
al dated 1804); extensive use of
such uncommon camera transi-
tions as iris-in & iris-out, lap-
dissolve, and zoom-out; use
of music, in this case some fast
and furious keyboard pieces by
Vivaldi. By all these means,
Truffaut compresses weeks of
real time down into a minute-
long montage of film time.
(Continued in Tuesday's paper)

Paramount Pictures '"
Presents' "
A Howard W. Koch *
-Alan Jay Lerner
Producion
r~r starring
Streisand
Montand .:"r a
On A Clew
OU Can See
Based upon the Musical Play
On A Clear Day You Can See Forever
Panavision- Technicolor A Paramount Picture
-G'-AN Ages Admitted General Audiences

TOO /
Late .. sff
The i .Met ocolgr
GP

iI

I

Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
presents
"CACTUS FLOWER"
by A BE BURROWS
OCTOBER 14-17
8:00 P.M. ot
Trueblood Theatre
TICKET PRICES: $2.00 to $2.50
662-9405
P.O. Box 1993 Ann Arbor, Mich. 48106
r _- ---

"A fluffy modern comedy"
"An incredibly likable film"
"PRETTY HEAVY
STUFF"
DIAL
662-
6264
"ONE OF THE
BETTER AMERICAN
FI LMS OF 1970" o i L
-Mcigandil

4
4

National General Theatres
FOHVILLiGE
375 No.MAPLE RD."7694300
NOW SHOWING
MON.-FRI.-7:00-9:30
SAT.-SUN.-2:00-
4:30-7:00-9:30

" THE LANDLORD"
OPEN 12:45
Shows at 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.

State & Liberty Sts.

i

DIAL
5-6290
ABC Pictores Corp in association with Palomar Pictures presents
Mn Associates and Aldrich Production of Robert Aldrich'

GAy

"'A rip-snorting
he-man war-adven lr
movie to stand as a
model hereafter."
Judith Crist,
New York Magazine

SHOWS AT
1:00 & 3:30
6:00 & 8:30

F

'Hill

I

is rescheduled for
SATURDAY, OCT.
7:00-10:00 P.M.
SUNDAY, OCT. 4
8:00 P.M.
Reserved Seats $2.00

----I,

Graduate Outing Club, Sunday, Oct.
4. 1:30 p.m., Meet in front of Rackham,
on Huron. Cars will leave from here for
afternoon of hiking and dinner after-
wards.
* * * *
UM Folk Dance Club Friday evening,
$-11, Barbour Gym, teaching, 8-9. Open
to all.
Undergraduate Mathematics Club.
Oct. 5, 1970, 7:00 Sharp! Room 3227,
Angell Hall, Prof. Thomas Storer "Re-
lations 'Between Combinatorics a n d
Classical Analysis."
Graduate Outing Club, Sun., Oct. 4,
1:30 p.m., meet in lront of Rackham
on Huron. Cars will leave from here
for afternoon of hiking and dinner
afterwards.
Baratin Coffee Hour, every Thurs., 3-
5, Frieze Bldg., Room 3050. Open in-
vitauon to people interested in French
language and culture.

GUILD HOUSE

802 MONROE
MONDAY OCT. 5th-NOON LUNCHEON 35c
PROF. ROBERT ADAMS, Dept. of Philosophy:
"The Ethics of Creation and
the Ethics of Pro-Creation"
BEST STEAK HOUSE
STEAK DINNERS
NOW SERVING
At Reasonable Prices
FI LET-1.59 SIRLOIN-1.53
Above includes Baked Potato,
Salad, and Texas Toast
STEAKBU RGER-.79
Includes Baked Potato and Texas Toast
217 S. STATE ST.
Next to State Ttheater

Box Office open weekdays
12:45-4:30 P.M.
For reservations dial 487-1220
University of Michigan Film Society
presents
MONDAY
John Cassovetes'
SHADO WS
"Under Cassavetes sensitive and indirect direction
the actors improvised a sincere, original, powerful
film.
H"Again and again the line between acting and living
is erased. Caught in ecstasy of collective creation,
a handful of earnest amateurs have produced a

Gelhs' tb h OA
pbaY t olw
Chc

significnt piece of folk art."
MONDAY, OCT. 5-7
Multipurpose Room UGLI

I I

The author of "Custer Died for Your Sins"-a devastating analysis of the Ameri-
can Indian, a proud tribal people who do NOT want to enter the mainstream of
homogeneous American life - now turns his attention to American society as a
whole.. .
AMERICAN INDIANS UNLIMITED & THE CENTICORE BOOKSHOP
INVITE YOU TO AN AUTOGRAPHING PARTY FOR
VINE DELORIA, JR.
TO HONOR THE PUBLICATION OF

I

"WE TALK,

YOU LISTEN"

AN INDIAN SOLUTION TO WHITE AMERICA

The answer to a legacy of genocide, imperialism, and liberalism centers around a
uniquely Indian idea: that real community development is a form of modern neo-
tribalism, that the elements of American society are in reality a collection of tribes

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