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October 01, 1970 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-01

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Page 'rwo

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 1, 1970

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, October 1, 1 970

cinema-
Le fling down pre tens ions

Edward Everett Horton dies

By NEAL GABLER
Itr really isn't fair to condemn
a film that's perfectly success-
ful in its genre unless, of course,
you happen to dislike the whole
genre. Ultimately a film c a n
only be as great as its ambi-
tions, and sheer entertainment
is good if it's entertaining. But
anyone who readtsKaufnaann or
Simon knows that not all crit-
ics subscribe to this theory:
they wear their repugnance of
kitsch as badges of honor. Who,
us? We don't e n j o y movies.
That's notpart of our job.
I have to admit that I go
along with them part way. Let's
face it - most films are trash.
But among the junk there are a
lot of movies that are diverting.
No, they aren't great films but
then they don't try to be. My
conscience demands I say all
this before I tell you that I like
Rider on the Rain. It certainly
isn't a great picture, but it is a
film without pretensions a n d
that's a recommendation if 1)
You're not a critic for The New
-Republic; or 2) You happen to
be in the mood for something
.without pretensions.
Like so many imports Rider
raises the question of flows. No

film industry exists in a vacu-
um and the process of borrow-
ing or influencing is continual.
One of the m o r e interesting
flows is from the American sus-
pense film - namely Hitchcock
- to t h e French thriller.
Doubtless one of the chief at-
tractions of the genre is the
challenge that it poses to the
filmmaker; manipulation re-
quires precision in construction.
Another appeal of Hitchcock,
though, is his childish wit and
the naiviete so many French-
men regard as the sophistica-
tion of unaffection - poison in
a glass of milk, a murder in the
middle of the opera, a battle on
Mount Rushmore, a man's life
hinging on the possession of his
cigarette lighter. The message,
if you look for those things, is
that between any two points is
a curvy line. What seems most
innocent may actually be the
greatest threat.
The latest filmmaker to suc-
cumb to the Hitchcock bug is
Rene Clement. Maybe he could
do better than to make a mod-
est thriller. Or maybe Forbidden
Games was the child of one of
those rare moments of genius,
and after the disastrous Is Par-
is Burning? Clement is eager to

settle in a new element. But the
question really isn't: How much
better is Clement than his film?
The question is: How well does
Rider on the Rain hold up as
suspense?
And except for minor flaws
like pseudo-psychological flash-
backs (Why oh why are film-
makers addicted to flashbacks
designed to reveal t h e inner
secrets of the mind in five min-
utes?), it holds up very well.
Clement follows the formula of
always keeping t h e viewer
guessing, but he never lapses in-
to the defiance of logic that so
many directors use to get them-
selves out of corners. Mellie's
(Marlene Jobert) husband is
due in from London and she's
waiting for him at home. While
she waits a rapist breaks into
the house, and little Mellie,
seized by terror, proceeds to
blow him apart with a double-
barrel shotgun. She disposes of
the body and all is well until
Dobbs (Charles Bronson speak-
ing French all the way), a man
who seems to know her secret,
arrives.
That's about as far as a syn-
opsizer dare go. The rest you'll
have to figure out for yourself.
Enjoy it.

ENCINO, Calif. () - Actor
Edward Everett Horton, fluttery
master of comic befuddlement
in plays, television and more
than 100 movies died yesterday
at 84.
The wispy, purse - mouthed
character was known to college
audiences as the narrator of
Bullwinkle's "Fractured Fairy-
tales." He had been a lifelong
bachelor.
Horton polished his style un-
til he was virtually an acting
unique. A spindly six-footer
with an expression of genteel
timidity, his trademarks were
an air of fluttery anxiety in the
face of crisis, and his sly, mis-
chievous grin. He was known as
a master of drawing room com-
edy, but played almost any role
that called for a display of con-
fusion, panic or disintegration
in the face of adversity - sales
clerks, fussbudget businessmen,
busybody relatives.
Sometimes he had played it

straight. In his younger days, he
was leading man to such stage
beauties as Gertrude Dallas,
Mary Servoss, Blanche Yrka and
Dorothy Dalton.
Horton's bread and butter ov-
er four decades was the play
Springtime for Henry in which
he appeared more than 2,600
times. Horton played Henry
Dewlip in the tale of a reform-
ed gay blade and the problems
of mismatched lovers, mugging,
laughing, crying, dancing. He
executed to perfection the dove-
tailing line - starting a sen-
tence, pausing at a certain
point, then finishing w i t h a
change of thought usually good
for a laugh.
In recent years he was often
seen as a guest in television
dramatic shows. O n 1 y last
March he told an interviewer
he figured he was "good for
another 20 years."
Horton said in a recent in-
terview: "I never considered

myself a movie actor, I'm a
stage actor, happiest when I'm
on the stage with a nice au-
dience."
"I played only three butlers,"
he once reflected in an inter-
view, "but people say, 'You've
played a lot of butlers'."
Why d i d he never marry?
"Hard to say. You become so
mesmerized by work that the
idea of socializing you rather
resent."
The place to meet
INTERESTING people
BACH CLUB
presents a
LIVE PERFORMANCE
of
Quartet No. 12 in G,
Mozart
K. 387
TIM McCOLLUM, violin
SUSAN TAYLOR, violin
TINA RAGONETTI, viola
WALDEN BARR, cello
plus commentary by
the performers
Thurs., Oct. 1, 8 P.M.
South Quad West Lounge
Refreshments & FUN afterwards
Everyone welcome! (No musical
knowledge needed.) Further info.
663-2827, 769-2003, 663-9619

FEM ININE
FROLIC
HALF PRICES FOR WOMEN
EVERY THURSDAY
Entertaining Thursday, Oct. 1
THE LEAVES OF GRASS
Te049W.4H4ren
208 W. Huron

4

-*PI

S.
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
Box Office Open 6:30

NOW SHOWING
SHOW TIMES
TODAY & FRIDAY
7-9
SAT. & SUN.
1-3-5-7-9

DAILY OFFICIAL,
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L. S. A. Bldg., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices are not accepted for
publication. For more information,
phone, 764-9270.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1
Day Calendar
Slavic Languages and Literatures and
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
aa.. aa.. .a"r: v .r:.,:":v::i ' :"."{..o.::".:"":iii:oi:ii
The Arab Student Organization and
the Arab American Community in Ann
Arbor will hold a general meeting in
tribute to the memory of the late
President Gamal Abdel Nasser. Thurs-

Center for Russian and E. European D j
Studies Lecture: R. Auty, Oxford, "The I I t l(CI etit J "ll't(?
Typology of Slavic Literary Languages"- Federal Service -Entrance E x a m
Aud. B, Angell Hall, 4:10 p.m. (FSEE) given in Ann Arbor. Applica-
Speech Student Lab. Theater: Line, tiEE) due Ot 7 for O. 17
Arena Theatre, Frieze Bldg., 4:10 p.m. DecembeOgrads sol Ogt.inonths
ne. Applics. at Career Planning, 3200
General Notices ! ^Inormation onllwng announce-
ments at Career Planning, 3200 SAB.
LS&A Scholarship applications may The Washington Journalism Center
be picked up in 1220 Angell Hall start- Fellowships for 1971, new booklet and
ing Sept. 21, due no later than Oct. 1, announcement available.
1 New Issue of Sociocom is here. Direct-
apply for Winter Term, 1971 or Spring- ory of available positions.
Summer Terms, 1971; applies, for next Info. on teaching with Bureau of In-
academic year will be avail. in Jan.; dian Affairs in Alaska avail.
to qualify you must have at least a 3.00NLast2NASAtst all this year, apply
Nov. 21. test Dec. 6.
overage in Call, of LS&A. Awards bas- Next Peace Corps Test, Nov. 15, 1:30,

I

I

mw

UMM04

ed primarily on need.
WXYZ presents

Post Office, Main at Catherine Streets.

CLINT EASTWOOD
SHIRLEY MACLAINE
A MARTIN RACKIN PRODUCTION
'TWO MULS FOR SISTER SIRA
Screenplay by ALBERT MALTZ - Story by BUDD BOET TiCER .-Directed by DON SIEGEL
Produced by MARTIN RACKIN and CARROLL. CASE
A UNIVERSAL PIC URE E TECHNICOLOR' " PANAVISION'
! ! .T~ ALL AGES ADMITTED pare - GdanCe Suqg ed+ a

DIAL 5-6290
ENDING TONIGHT
LIZA MINELLI
IN
OTTO PREMINGER'S
"HIGHEST RATING"
--N.Y. Daily News

4

THE LETTERMEN
and the WILSON BROWN TRIO
FRIDAY, OCT. 16 - 8:30 P.M., MASONIC AUDITORIUM
TICKETS-$5.50. $4.50, $3.50
AVAILABLE AT: Masonic'Box Office and all Hudson's ticket
outlets. MAIL ORDERS: Send self-addressed stamped envelope
with check or money order to Masonic Box Office, 500 Temple,
Detroit, Michigan 48201

' i

Doors Open
12:45

Shows At
1, 3, 5,
7. 9 P.M.

FRIDAY
Michael Caine.
Cliff Robertson
in

day, Oct. 1, 1970, Michigan Union, Em.
3R, 8:00 p.m.
Christian Science Organization, Oc-
tober 1, 7:30 p.m., 3545 SAB. Regular O
Meeting: All are welcome.
All are welcome to Baratin Coffee
Hour, every Thursday. Next meeting .oWell, if the Moroccan Teddy Bear gets here in time
Open invitationutoanyonenterested we have bread and cheese this weekend. The good
All are welcome to Baratin Coffee news will warble for your rural delectation. Promi-s
Hour, every Thursday beginning Sept. e
24, 3-5. Frieze Bldg., Room 3050. Open nent lecturer Mark Harris, Tulane efficgy 1964, will
invitation to people interested into
French language and culture. speak on the Demythification of Pogo. All this at
Canterbury House, 330 Maynard, on Friday, Octo-
Students For ber the Second. All for the paltry sum of two dollars
RICHARD and fifty cents. Cease Choking.r
A U , Iir aa

McGOVERN
Sunday, Oct. 25, 1970
Hill Auditorium
4: 00 p.m.
Gen. Admn. $1.50

+

"Too Late
The Hero "

CLARK

Litter doesn't throw
itself away; litter
doesn't just happen.
People cause it-and'
only people can prevent,'
It. "People" means you.
Keep America Beautiful.
odvertising contributed
for the public good

Friday, Oct. 30, 1910
Rackham Auditorium
8:00 p.m.
Gen. Adm. $1.50

4op

N 1 M:7 m

~ -U___ _-- - t- -
Sat, and Sun.
For Sect'y of State "BELLE DE JOUR"-
MASS. MEETINGI__
Thurs., Oct. 1, 7:30 -
3524,SAB Thursday-Friday, Oct. 1-2 Daily Classifieds Get
National General Theatres * Phone 764-05'
FOX VILLGE IDOUBLE BILL:
375 NoMAPLE RD.-769I3O0U
WNOW SHOWING YIA DIC fl TATEE ANN ARBOR CIVIC THE
MN-RI.-7.:09:00 MEXICAN BUSRIDE TARTUFFE A NA B RCVCT
SAT.-SUN.-2:00- proudly presents its 41st season
4:30-7:00-9:30 dir. LUIS BUNUEL (1951) dir. F. W. MURNZU (1927 silent) "CACTUS FLOWER" Oct. 14-17
Paramountctures a young innocent Emil Jannings
Pr"snt"MAN OF LA MANCHA"
Seem learns the stars in the classic "SUBJECT WAS ROSES" Mar. 3-6
sfacts of life Moliere Comedy "BLITHE SPIRIT" Ma
* "IN WHITE AMERICA" Apr. 21-24
"THE BRASS AND GRASS FOREVER
Yves Oct. 3-4-THE RED DESERT (an original musical)
Montand
DON'T DELAY-ORDER YOUR SEASON TICKI
onArCI ' 7 & 9.30 Architecture (Use This Coupon)
Y Can See r (not 9:05) 75c
BaseduPonheMusicaPiay AuditoriumNAME PHONE
On A Clear Day You Can See Forever U -00 I
Panavision Technicolor A Paramount Pictur a A D D RESS _____u _________
G--A Ages Admitted General Audiences
I_ __ _CITY ___ZIP
Please reserve sets of season tickets, asi
I have enclosed $ I understand the
The Center for Afro-American and African Studies edlope Sh os
6 SHOWS
Invites you to its Lecture Series ,Wed. balcony $ $.0. .
BLACK PERSPECTIVES IN THE SEVENTIES *Wed. orchestra 10.50._

Results
58

MsirJ

CE NT'ER

ATRE

In~

annddunces
Sale on Air Demo and Used Equipment

Dec. 16-20
r. 31-Apr. 3
" May 5-9
ETS TODAY

Compacts
1-KLH 1.1-$159 Demo
Tape Recorders & Decks
1-Viking 77-$175
1-Ampex 761-$199
1-Revox A77
New $569-Now $400
Receivers Amps & Tuners
2-Sony 6060-$299
1-Sony 6050-$229
1-Dyna ST 120-$125
1-Dyna MK 11-$50
1-Fisher FM 200B Tuner-$85
1-Pioneer SX-3007 Demo.-$125
1-ScotMono Tuner-$15

Turntables & Changers
1-Pioneer PLA-25-$100
Headphone
1-KOSS K-6
Were $26.50-Now $19.95
2-AKG K-20
Were $19.95-Now$13.95
2-SHARPE HA-660
Were $39.95-Now $15.95
1--SHARPE.HA-8
Were $29.95-Now $15.95
1-SONY DR-3C
Were $13.95-Now $5.95
1--MAGNAVOX
Were $15.95-Now $9.95

I*.

ndicated below.
tickets will be
dressed, stamp-

.I

5 SHOWS
7.00_

i

4

9.00 .

PLUS SALE ON ALL DEMO-SONY, MAGNAVOX & HITACHI PORTABLE,& TABLE RADIOS

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