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September 29, 1970 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-29

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 29; 19.70

page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, September 29, 1 97C*

ASKS RECONCILIATION:
Fleming urges firm
action on disruption

Gamal Nasser dies in Egypt;
fate of Mideast talks uncertain

One college does more
than broaden horizons. It
sails to them,and beyond

(Continued from Page 1)
music to get attention from those
schools.
Continuing, Fleming questioned
whether there might be a way to
reorganize the literary college to
"Inaximize the disadvantage of its
enormous size."
Speaking on the University's1
financial difficulties, Fleming said
that all universities are facing
money problems because of loss
of image, other pressing domestic
needs and a temporary surplus of
degree holders.
He emphasized the annual ef-
fects of inflation, saying that
salaries have not kept pace with
the cost of living and that funds
for equipment and supplies have
remained constant despite higher
prices.
Fleming said that while several
hundred million dollars of new
facilities are needed for the state's
colleges and universities, there is*
no possibility this need can be met:
out of current appropriations.
"We must turn to a searching
reexamination of some of our in-
ternal pratices in an effort to
find economics which will enable
us to divert funds into new pro-
grams, or areas having higher
prior'ities," Fleming added.
The University's commitment to
increased m i n o r i t y enrollment,
costing an additional one per cent
of the University's operating bud-
get over the next few years, is
one of these high priority items,
he explained.
Fleming praised the majority
of students and faculty members
who have, he said, showed re-.
straint and "little sympathy with
the destructive and totalitarian
few who are in their midst.",
( Before Fleming's speech, the le-
cipients of the faculty achieve-
mert awards, the service awards
for instructors and assistant pro-.
fessors and the University Press
book award were announced. f Suie
story, Page 10).
Earlier in the day, Fleming ex-
pressed his general approval of
the report on campus unrest. "The
conclusions of the commission im-
press me as sound, objective and
understanding," he said.
Policy board
e' 1:
gves viewsr
+n problems
(Continued from Page 1'
Most faculty imembers hope for
revisions in the Regents Interim
Disciplinary Rules. "I think that
the rules were made as a response
to last spring's strike and would
hope that they are only interim
rules," says Rich English, lecturer
in the School of Social Work.
Students, however, object much
more bitterly to the adoption of
the disciplinary rules. Ed Fabre,
'71L, says of the rules that "they'
are ridiculous. As a law student;
I question their constitutionality.
They deal only with the symptoms
rather than with the cause of so-
called student disruptive conduct."
On the issue of low income
housing opinions are divided on
what the responsibility of the Uni-
versity should be. "The University
has a responsibility to build low
income .h o u s i n g," says Susan
Rains, Grad. "The University has
passed off this responsibility to
the private sector,"
"I do not think that the Uni-
;versity has the responsibility to
build low income housing," count-
ers History Prof. Brad. Perkins.
"However I feel that it is a prac-
tical and desirable matter to build
in order to enable people, who
wouldn't be able to afford to come
here, to attend this University."
OSS office personnel changes
will soon be made, according to

most of the board members.:
"There will probably be certain
high level administrators that will
be asked to resign," De Grieck
says. According to Hollenshead
most personnel changes will not
occur immediately because of con-
tracts.
Faculty members did not wish
to commit themselves on this issue
until they were more informed
and were asked about specific
positions.

He added that while portions of
the report were enlightening,
there was nothing really new in
its findings. Fleming said the
value of the report will be what
is done with the commission's rec-
7ommendations.
"An important theme of the
report is the need for reconcilia-
tion and the lowering of the tone
of combative rhetoric," he said.
Fleming emphasized that the Uni-
versity would benefit from the
commission's suggestion of federal
support for minority students.
rg VOtE
regstrtio

ends Oct.

2

(Continued from Page 1)
Premier Golda Meir of Israel was
reported shocked when told by
newsmen of Nasser's death.
Israel's foreign minister, Abba
Eban, said in New York a "strug-
gle for power" might follow Nas-
ser's death, with the result that
"Egypt may want to shorten its
front and not be involved in such
a high degree of international ac-
tivity."
Messages poured into Cairo. The
Soviet charge d'affairs presented
his country's condolences.
Soviet Ambassador Jacob A.
Malik, speaking at the United Na-
tions in New York, called Nasser a
"great statesman" and a "great
advocate of friendly relations with
the people of the Soviet Union."
Tass, official news agency of
the Soviet Union, made only a
brief announcement last night on
the death.I
Further statements were expect-
ed shortly, and it was announced
Premier Alexei Kosygin will fly
to join other friendly heads ofI
state in a last tribute. In recent
years Moscow was Nasser's chief
patron, supplying him with arma-:
ment and building the Aswan
Dam.
Now complexity is added to an:
already complicated picture. The
Arab leaders at summit sessions
had worked out hastily an agree-
ment which was supposed to settle
the Jordanian violenceswhile leav-
ing unresolved the basic conflict
between the Jordanian army and
the Palestinian guerrillas.rAtruce
commission has been appointed,
but its authority has been couched
in ambiguous phrases. Such an1
agreement could be far more dif-
ficult to carry out now.
Before the Cairo announcement,
yesterday of Nasser's death, Is-
rael charged that Egypt continues
to mass Soviet missiles in the Suez
Canal cease-fire zone, putting a
new strain on the Middle East
peace stalks.
Egypt claimed all missiles in the
Zone were defensive and chal-

sansc nf u~inry mn,n w mernn a n
saria of uJry men, ~wur l a~ It is impossible to say with any
1 accuracy how many died here. The
Ih army claims very few. The guer-
K unster nitsrillas say thousands.
* ' * At the State Department, of-
violence in ficials immediately began a series
of conference yesterday to analyze
e cothe impact of Nassar's death yn
American govt. American interests in the Middle:

buildup "is going forward un-I
abated to this very day" with at
least 20 SAM2 and SAM3 batteries
introduced into the Suez area.
He reiterated, Israel's Intention
to stay away from the peace talks'
under the direction of U.N. special
envoy Gunnar V. Jarring until it
considers violations of the U.S.-
arranged cease-fire s t a n d s t ill
agreement- rectified.
Meanwhile, in Amman, a city
thick with the litter of war, thou-
dni of hiisr ma dna n

children clamor and fight and ,law
for food.
On Jebel Hussein, one of the
seven hills of Amman, this was the
ugly aftermath of civil war.
For 11 days, Jordanian soldiers
battled in the streets with Pales-
tinian guerrillas. For the moment,
the fighting was over and the peo-
ple emerged from their cellars to
seek the necessities of life. They:
need food and, even more, they
need water.

1

(Continued from Page 1)
strate a sufficient degree of in-
dependence from his prior home.
The city has drawn up a ques-
tionnaire to determine a students'.
residency status based on a stu-
dents source of income, the length
of his continuous residency in the
city, his marital status, and his
community involvement other
than as a student.
"While there is no hard and
fast rule," Lax says, a student who
is more than 50 per cent self-suf-
ficient is "likely to qualify."
In spite of the .obstacles to es-
tablishing residency, City Clerk
Harold Saunders,-says that a high
percentage of the students who
have applied to vote here have
met city requirements for resi-
dency.
Those who are denied registra-
tion may appeal the decision, of
the registrar to 'the cityattorneys
office, Lax says.
Students who qualify as city
residents can vote Nov. 3 for can-
didates for U.S. Senate, U.S. con-
gress, state governorship, the state
legislator, the state supreme court,,
and for county commissioners.
Also on the ballot will be pro-
posed amendments to the state
constituton to lower the voting

(Continued from Page 2)
However, Kunstler added, "I
don't think tinkering will be
enough - we need a fearful re-
vision. And this revision must be+
done on a local level."
"To wait for revision on the
national level is to wait for de-
struction," he said.
Responding to questions about
the up-coming White Panther
trial, Kunstler called the con-
spiracy charges a "frame-up."
"It's a device by the government:
to put the blame on people whoa
are politically active, just as in
Chicago." Kunstler said. "I am
going to show what the govern-
ment resorts to, to choke off any
kind of significent dissent in this
country."
Another student, expressing fear
that blacks and whites are drift-
ing further apart, asked Kunst--
ler, "What can we whites do?"
"We all have guilt feelings, butf
they shouldn't be our motivation,"'
Kunstler said. "Don't let these'
guilt feelings de-energize you.
Asking 'why am I here at a racist
institution' will only stifle you -
making you unproductive."
"The only feasable way for us
to work together now is on a poli-

East.
From the Washington point of,
view perhaps the most urgent and:
critical question which is posed
is the question of Nasser's suc-
cessor. The first reaction of auth-
orities here was that a power
struggle might result inside Egypt
with an accompanying turmoil in}
the Arab world, for Nasser was,
regarded as by far the Arab's most
influential personality not only in
his own country but through the
whole Arab region.
Closely related to the issue of
succession is the question of Soviet
influence in the country which for
more than a decade has been de-
pendent on Soviet arms and mili-
tary advisers. Today there a r e
thousands of Soviet advisers and
technicians in Egypt.
Try Daily Classifieds
- -_ n

Now there's away for you to know 2
the world around you first-hand.
Away to seethe things
you've read about, and t
study as you go. The way"' r
is a college that uses the
Parthenon as a class-
room for a lecture on
Greece, and illustrates
Hong Kong's floating societies
with a ride on a harbor sampan.
Chapman College's World Campus
Afloat enrolls two groups of 500
students every year and opens up the
world for them. Your campus is the
s.s. Ryndam, equipped with modern
educational facilities and a fine faculty.
You have a complete study curriculum
as you go. And earn a fully-accredited
semester while at sea.
Chapman College is now accepting
enrollments for Spring and Fall '71
semesters. Spring semesters circle the,
world from Los Angeles, stopping in,
Asia and Africa and ending in New
York. Fall semesters depart New York

t
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9 c ~ d
w * .-

for port stops in Europe, Africa and
Latin America, ending in Los Angeles.
The world is there. The way to show
it to inquiring minds is there. And
financial aid programs are there, to6.
Send for our catalog with the coupon
below.. s.s. Ryndam is of Netherlands
registry.
You'll be able to talk to a World Campus
Afloat representative and former students:
* Saturday, October 31, 2:30 p.m.
* Albert Pick Hotel, Manor Room
-1427 W.Saginaw
" East Lansing, Michigan

$

*60000*000000gg *g...***g* @gg~* * **@,* **O** ** ** g *** ***
" S WORLD CAMPUS AFLOAT
Director of Student Selection Services
e Chapman College, Orange, Calif. 92666

M
"
"
s
"
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s
"
"

Please send your catalog and any other material I need to have.

1970-71 SCHOOL INFORMATION
Mr.
Miss
Mrs.
Last Name First Initial

HOME INFORMATION

'#
g.
4
"
C

Home Address Street

WANTED!
Chairman for
WORLD'S
FAIR
Petitions-UAC offices
2nd floor Union

Name of School City State Zip
.
" ampuAddress street Home Phonerea Code
ty tats Zip Until into should be sent to campus D home Q
:Campus Phone( approx. date+
" Area Code Iaminterested, In( Fall Spring Q 19
* u.,, I would like to talk to a representative of WORLD :
** ****o** *.0 F S o cale . CAMPUS AFLOAT WA-

4

i.

lenged Israel to rejoin the sus- tical level - and that does n o t
pended Arab-Israeli talks. mean domination by whites,"
Abba Eban, Israel's foreign min- Kunstler continued. "There is a
ister, told the 126-nation U N. separatism which I think is im-
General Assembly the missile portant and necessary now."

rI

I

V~~' r! rL _J!

ag~e to 0 its an utouar state aiduo1 I w tu
parochial schools. There will also R r ru 1
be a $100 million bond issue pre- : 2W. 668-7942
sented for the construction of
low-income housing. features
City voters will also face a $3
million bonding issue for damn con-~
annexation proposal that would
add 3600 housing units to the city,; the most respected name in
and a millage proposal to provide
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