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September 22, 1970 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesdoy, September 22, 197

Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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WORDING ON DISAGREEMENTS:
State legislature debates' bill.
on environmental conversation'

Hic kel backs new
U.S. Indian policy

FFr-I-

2

r

IANSING (P) - Another piece
of environment-protecting legis-
lation has become a hot issue in'
Lansing, now that s o m e tough
new laws are safely bn the books.
Michigan drew national atten-
tibn earlier this year with passage
of a bill giving citizens the right
to file suit to protect natural re-
sources, even without showing
personal loss. The legislature also
passed a law requiring companies
to report their waste discharges
and pay the State a fee for its
work as watchdog.
The latest controversy is over a
bill to designate and protect wild
and scenic streams. Each chamber
has approved a bill, but neither
will accept the other's version.,
The key issue is whether the
Department of Natural Resources
should h a v e authority to issue
stream-protecting zoning regula-
tions if local authorities fail to.
So far, the House says yes; the
Senate, no.
As. originally introduced, the

Rivers Bill called for the Depart-
ment .to designate certain streams.
for protection. Public hearings
would be held and local authori-
ties would be urged to zone river-
front areas to maintain the nat-
ural quality of the stream.
The House 'replaced the original
with a substitute giving the De-
partment of Natural Resources
authority to issue a zoning regu-
lation if local authorities did not
provide .adequate protection.
The Senate, however, did not
include the state-zonihg provis-
ion - and conservationists climb-
ed the wall. T h e y claimed the
Senate version provided no real
protection, that it would call at-
tention- to scenic rivers without
giving the state any real authority
to keep them that way.
The bill came up again during
the two-day session last week. The
House refused by a 95-0 vote to
accept the Senate bill. The next
day. the Senate refused 15-13 to
accept the House version. Now the'

matter is in conference committee.
Both Gov. William Milliken
and Attorney General Frank Kel-
ley thought enough of the House
version to issue statements of dis-
appointment after the Senate re-
fused to accept it. And Consumers
Power Co. has come in for a lot
of criticism from conservation
groups.
They claim the big utility voic-
ed no opposition to the bill when
it sailed through' the House and
then through Senate committees.
Suddenly, they s a y, Consumers
Power began working behind the
scenes to yank the teeth out of
the House bill - to delete the
crucial zoning privilege 'for the
DNR.
Consumers owns a lot of land
fronting rivers that might be des-
ignated wild or scenic.
A Consumers spokesman s a i d
that if the company is to be pre-
vented from using its land be-
cause of a state zoning regulation,
it should be paid for the property.
The spokesman, who asked not
to be identified, said the Federal
Wild and Scenic Rivers Act pro-
vides for purchase of privately
held riverfront land. He said the
company is conservation-minded,
and that if the state-zoning pro-
vision were replaced by a land
condemnation provision the com-
pany would be "delighted" to sup-
port it. T h i s, of course, would
mean the firm would be paid for
the land it could not use under
the "Wild and Scenic" designa-
tion.

WASHINGTON (P)-- Secre-
tary of the Interior Walter J.
Hickel said yesterday the federal
government's obligation to protect
American Indians' rights often
loses out to covetous ambitions
within the same government to-
ward Indian lands and waters.
He called this a historic conflict
of interest which is unconscion-
able and must be corrected in the
interests of morality and justice.
Testifying before a Senate sub-
committee in behalf of adminis-
tration legislation to provide legal
counsel for Indians, Hickel said,
"When the Indian complains that
'white man speaks with forked
tongue;, there often is more truth
than poetry in his words."
Hickel testified on behalf of,
two proposals by President Nixon.
One would create an Indian Trust
Counsel Authority within the
President's office to defend t h e
Indians from other federal, state
or private actions threatening
their natural resources.
The other proposal would create
a new Interior assistant secretary
in charge of Indian and territory
matters. Right now, the Bureau
of Indian Affairs reports to the
assistant secretary in charge of
public land management.
"This may sound like Just ano-
ther bureaucratic notion," Hickel
said, "but to me, it is a'gut issue.
It involves the morality of this
great country in its dealings with
the First Americans.'
Sen. Fred R. Harris, (D-Okla.),
agreed with the thrust of the two
plans and in his testimony before
the, Senate Indian Affairs s u b-
committee congratulated the Pre-
sident on them.

But he said they don't go far
enough, The proposed trust coun-
sel authority should be empowered
to act in other than just claims of
Indians to natural resources, Har-
ris said.
"The responsibilities of the fed-
eral government to American Ind-
ians are notalir ited to their rights
to 'use of water, timber, and min.
erals and right to hunt and fish,'
Harris said..
"The federal government has
the responsibility to see that the
American Indian has a real
chance for a job, a good education
and decent health care, among
other things," he said.
Hickel said the President's pro-
posal would not extend beyond
providing legal counsel for Ind-
ians in mineral and natural re-
source cases.
He said the Indian Trust
Counsel Authority would be gov-
erned by a three-man board, two
of the members being Indians.
I

Milliken issues memo
on campus violence

U -M Barbers
8:30-5:15 P.M.-
Monday-Saturday
U- M Union.

I-

LANSING (RP" - In a recent me-
morandum to college and univer-
sity presidents and local officials,
Gov. William Milliken says it is
essential to develop "appropriate
plans to prevent violence."
Milliken said public order, t h e
opportunity for learning, and
freedom of expression are being
"challenged by those who would
resort to 'crime, violence and in-,
timidation to enforce their will."
The Governor said the meor-
andum updates his 1969 memo to
campus administrators. It includes
a statement that State Polic4 have
sophisticated bomb disposal equip-
ment and are prepared to help if
bomb threats are made.
Milliken called for "constant ex-
change -of information" am o ng
institutions, local; agencies and
State Police. He said state police
have the primary responsibility
for handling disorder and that the,
National Guard would be used'
only in extreme emergency.
The Governor also made these
points:

-"Request for assistance w i 11
not result in the State Police tak-
ing over the police functions of an
institution or local police respon-
sibilities. They will be, there in a
supporting role to assist and to
advise as necessary.,
-"The emergency powers of the
Governor provided in Act No. 302,
Public Acts of 1945, will be invok-
ed only in extreme cases of public
disorder or public emergency.
-"The Attorney, General has
indicated that he has assigned a
task force of attorneys to be
available for consultation and
assistance to campus and local of-
ficials in the event of campus dis-
order."
TV RENTALS
$10.50 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

I

CINEMA

II

.
,
.
.t

rt

INIVERSITY

FREE L

presents

I

Registration and Craft Fair
REGISTER FOR CLASSES SEPT. 22-26
TUESDAY-FRIDAY-i1O-4-FISHBOWL
SATURDAY-10-4-DI'AG
Community Craft Fair Sept. 26
SATURDAY-10-4-DIAG

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ESr

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All interested artists are invited
to display or sell their work

.

A 'STEIN FULL OF FEIN FILM FOR YOU
Thurs. 7:00 psm.-WILD HORSES OF FIRE-A Russian Epic
Sept. 24 9:00 p.m *-SMILES OF A SUMMER NIGHT-Bergman
11:00 p.m.-SMILES Of A SUMMER NIGHT

Ot

Now maybe your folks
will understand you.

f

f .--

Fri.
Sept. 25

7:00 p.m--THE INFORMER-Dir. John Ford
VICTOR McLAGLEW in a drama 4
of the 'lrich Republican Army:
9:00 p.m.*-THE MAGNIFICIENT AMBERSONS-Dir.Orson Welles
JOSEPH COTTON

I

11:00 p.m.-THE MAGNIFICIENT AMBERSONS

You can pin your communication pr
on the generation gap. But that's
a cop-out. Youmay just have lousy
penmanship.
To get your point across. And
do it sharply, you need a Panasonic
electric pencil sharpener.
Because it has tungsten-steel cutter
blades. that last ten times longer

Sat.

7:00 p.m.-THE INFORMER

l

I

Sept. 26 9:00 p.m.*-THE LADY VANISHES-Dir. Alfred Hitchcock
11:00 p.m.-THE LADY VANISHES

than ordinary cutter blades.
And a sealed electric motor that
should last you at least through
college. Even if you repeat a course.
i Your pencils will last longer, too. Thanks
to an electronic eye that flashes when your point
is made.
And while you're cleaning up your vocabulary,
.x.,s~.. ~Y,,. r;,,,. ,.,, ~n ,,, ;"'; " 0t~'',,,

Sun.
Sept. 27

you won t be coaxing your pau any iirlier. ecause our
Point-O-Matic electric pencil sharpener has a slide-out tray that keeps all
the pencil shavings inside. Until you're ready tp throw them out.
Get a Panasonic electric pencil sharpener at the same place you find
Panasonic lamps. Your college bookstore.

7:00 p.m.-BLACK ORPHEUS
9:00 p.m.-BLACK ORPHEUS
*PLEASE NOTE TIME CHANGES-tickets go on sale for each
show at 6:30 p.m. the night of the show. A separate admission
will be charaed for each performance. ,l

4f

And start improving communications with the old folks at home.

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