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September 22, 1970 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-22

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Tuesday, September 22, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Tuesday, September 22, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pae.in

.- % .. .. f . 4

B

o passes

first

test,

kawaits

Huskies

he

Coact

By PAT ATKINS
After last Saturday's g a m e
against Arizona, Wolverine foot-
ball coacl' Bo Schembechler ad-
mitted to being somewhat cautious
about his -on-the-field behavior.
I did a good job of restraining
myself on the sidelines," he ex-
plained. "I was apprehensive, like
a sophomore starting his first
game."
IT WAS his first pressure test
singe the heart attack at the Rose
Bowl, and Schembechler remark-.
ed, "I feel better psychologically
now that It's over. I'll have to face-
it."'
Yesterday there was the news
that offensive tackle Jack Harp-
ring may not make this week's
*ame because of shoulder slippage -
and that third deep tackle Jim
Coode is equally, unpredictable as
to line-up availability. The slow

leak in the depth had begun be-
fore the season even started, with
defensive tackle Fred Grambau
and backfield members Bruce El-
liott and John Daniels out for the
first and probably the second
game.
ALSO YESTERDAY there was
the film of Washington gaining
over 600 yards against Michigan
State and' the film of Michiga.n's
poor offensive showing against
Arizona.
A lesser man might be popping
tranquillizers. Schembechler re-
mains consistently nonplussed.
"After the game, people expect-
ed me to go and throw a fit be-
cause we looked terrible. I don't
like the way we did it, but we won.
I'd rather we'd played better, if
I had my druthers-and next
week we'd better play better."
His calm demeanor does not

dail
,sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
RICK CORNFELD

i

standing
pat -Pat Atkins,

mean Schembechler is taking - a
soft line approach on the practice
field. He smiled enthusiastically
when asked about practices lead-
ing up to the Washington game.
"There I become my congenial'
self."' After a pause for the chuc-!
kles, he added, "After this week is
over, if any one on the team had
a gun, they'd be hunting me up.}
The freshmen, especially on, de-
fense, will suffer, I hope."
Michigan's offensive blocking
was the sore spot for Schem-
bechler last weekend. Nine Wol-
verine passes were batted down
and the backs blocked poorly,,
managing to miss the holes while
sometimes entangling their owne
offensive crew. Nor was Michigan
being blitzed or out-pressured.
"MOORHEAD COULD h a v e
peeled a banana and eaten it withr
all the time he had. Arizona's
linebackers had 80 yards to their
sides, yet they just stuck up their
hands, and knocked away the
balls," Schembechler explained.
Harpring, who worked out in
yesterday's light practice, may be
chanting all week that he is not
hurt. His shoulder injury came in
the first -half of Saturday's game,
and his loss would crimp the of-
fensive line's efforts for improve-
ment. Jim Brandstatter presently
would be the fill-in.
If Coode, also an offensive
tackle, remains in the health serv-
ice infirmary with the flu, then
Schembechler may move guard
Werner Hall into the back up!

short of that obyective by 46 yards
against Arizona.
THE BACKS, Glenn Doughty,
Billy Taylor, Lance Scheffler, and
Bill Berutti, rushed for only 122
of those yards, with 25 coming at
once off Taylor's run midway in
the first quarter. Part of the
blame Schembechler lays to little
practice for the running backs,
especially Do u gh ty. "It's not
Doughty's fault," Schembechler
noted. "If anyone's at fault, it's
me for letting him play before he's
ready."
A tired Doughty was replaced in
the fourth quarter of the Arizona
game by Scheffler, and Schem-
bechler indicated that he might
also use Preston Henry against
the Huskies this weekend.
On offense, only Reggie McKen-
zie earned Schembechler's praise,
and the champions of the week
were defensive players Tom Dar-
den and Dana Coin.
"We know that we can play
better than we did last Saturday,"
Schembechler c o n c l u d e d. "We
haven't yet proved that we're a
420-yards and 35 point team."
A limited number of tickets
are still available f o r the
Knicks-Pistons basketball ex-
hibition game at Crisler Arena
Thursday. Ticket prices are $1
for students with ID card and
faculty and staff with athletic'
card, and $2.50 for all others,
and can be purchased at the
ticket office at the corner of
State and Hoover streets.

A. LEE KIRK

Pooh-Bear likes honey ..
...how sweet it is
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR Don Canham enjoys a football victory
as much as anyone, but there was something else at Satur
day's football game that made him very happy. In fact, there
were 80,386 things that made him just about the happiest man in
town, as 80,386 people from all corners of the state and from all
walks of life ambled to Ann Arbor to watch the Wolverines win
a gridiron contest that sometimes had all the raw excitement of
a three day Monopoly game.
Still, any time you draw over 80,000 people to watch a
football game that has all the markings of a slaughter,
you've go to be doing a good job of selling your product.
And Canham has been doing just that. Although the Detroit
media hasn't exactly been saturated, the Athletic Depart-
ment has placed a fairly large number of ads in the Detroit
papers as well as in local rags, and they seem to be doing the
trick. Just last year, less than 50,000 fans showed up on a
beautifulday to watch the Washington game.
AND SPEAKING of Washington, the Wolverines patsy non-
conference schedule has rolled over and died. The Huskies, who
will host the 'M' gridders this Saturday, rolled 598 yards en
route to a 42-16 slaughter of Michigan State, and no Spartan
has ever surrendered so much yardage. Leading the Huskies is
a Cherokee quarterback named Sonny Sixkiller (!), who should
give the Wolverine's young secondary a' good test.
And another sophomore quarterback, Texas A&M's Lex
James unloaded a 79-yard bomb with 13 seconds to go to give
the Aggies a 20-18 victory over LSU, the first time they've
beaten the Tigers in The Den at Baton Rouge in years.
The Aggies will play in Ann Arbor a week from Saturday.
THE PACK IS BACK! - way back. The back-sliding Green
Bay Packers hit rock-bottom Sunday as Detroit ripped them to
shreds, 40-0.
Lots of Detroit people are talking the Lions up as cham-
pionship threats this year, and if they stay healthy, it just
might happen. But Lion fans can find little encouragement
in Minnesota's 27-10 revenge win over Kansas City. Joe
Kapp apparently won't play this year, but Gary Cuozzo did a
fine job directing the Viking offense, and the Four Norse-
men and company took away the Chiefs running game and
Len Dawson's deep passes.
Pittsburgh is really sitting sweet in the National League
East after taking three of four in New York. They are two
games up with their only remaining tough series coming up this
weekend when the Mets invade. In addition to this series, the
Mets close against the Cubs. Chicago will play all their remain-
ing games on the road.

Je4ntei

I

On little oddities
and big money
If you're not a collector, forget it.
You'll never understand why a couple hundred people would
A closet themselves 'inside the Statler-Hilton Hotel in Detroit on
one of the few remaining week-ends of the summer.
Or why somone would hop a plane in Phoenix, Arizona,
and travel all the way to Detroit.
Essentially, why anyone would go anywhere to trade old
baseball guides, or yearbooks, or autographed balls, or match
covers, sports magazines, cigarette cards, or bubble gum cards.
Even the answer given by Detroit Tiger broadcaster Ernie'
Harwell wouldn't satisfy 'you. "It's like the mountain," he says
mystically, "if it's there, they'll collect them."-
The "they" include Harwell, and the "they" were at the
First Annual Midwest Sports Collectors convention held a little
over a week ago in Detroit.
"I'm sure the mothers of the little boys who go out and buy
baseball cards don't realize the extent of that action," one of
the organizers of the convention, Dick Reuss, says.
About two-thirds of the buying, selling, trading, and
auctioning includes bubble gum cards, which date from
1933, and cigarette cards, which appeared from 1900-1915,
Reuss states. "There's not too much of the Red Grange
sweat shirt type of item. Autographed baseballs make up
the majority of the sports memorabilia."
Reuss, who's been collecting for 22 years, specializes in card
collecting and owns about 70,000. He figures that puts him
roughly in the top quarter in the country as far as size of card
collections go. One of the largest, containing 2 million cards,
belongs to a dealer.
The most valuable item is, in fact, a baseball cigarette card.
Only seven copies of the Honus Wagner card from 1910 are
known to-be in existence, two of which are in museums. "Those
cards go for what anybody is willing to pay, actually," Reuss
says. "I'd figure an average of $500, but that could go from
anywhere between $250 to $1000."
For Harwell, the collecting days are just about over. He
gave his entire collection to the Detroit Public Library about
5 years ago, when he bought a winter home in Florida. "If
we had added five more rooms to our house in Florida," he
jokes," I would have been able to keep the collection."
His memorabilia, amassed over a 39 year period, in-
cluded old contracts, pictures going back 50 years, World
Series programs, all-star programs, and about 90,009 clip-
pings.
"They asked me about giving my collection to Cooperstown,"
Harwell says, "but it's so far away and hard to get to that no
one in Detroit could have really used it. This way if someone is
doing a story the material is handy."
He donated almost his entire collection, but saved a few
pictures and a check signed by Babe Ruth in 1922 for one half
a month's salary-about $4,000 for the Babe.
Reuss and collectors like him aim for a legitimate base
and solidarity for sports memorabilia collecting. The past
few years mutual aficionados have met in private homes to
carry out their business. The group has come above ground
as a result of the efforts of Detroit area collectors.
Although catalogues and dealers and collectors existed prior
to the convention, no national organization has reqlly been
sustained. "Next year, with more publicity and advertising, we
hope toy triple our attendence and have many thousands here.
We are in the black from the couple of auctions we held, since
we received a 20 per cent commission on the items," Reuss said. -
If you find it even harder to understand now why many
thousands of people, much less hundreds, would attend
such a show, rest assured-there actually were some items
that were unsalable.
4 One, for instance was a huge, framed color portrait of
Hal Newhouser, Detroit Tiger hurler of the Forties. "I knew no
one would bid on that as soon as I saw it, Reuss relates. "It
would be embarrassing for Harwell, too, and he was doing us a
favor by auctioning off some of the items. Then they went and
put a minimum bid of $15 on it. Sure enough, nobody bid on the
damn thing and we had to take it back."
All face was not lost for the Tiger sportscaster, however.
Reuss adds quickly, "Some one went and paid $8.50 for his
necktie, so that made up for it a little."

-Daily-Eric Pergeaux
MICHIGAN MIDDLE linebacker Marty Huff (70) accosts an
Arizona running back in Saturday's game which the Wolverines
won, 20-9. Huff intercepted a pass late in the fouth period to
set up a Michigan touchdown which put the game on ice.

TEXAS THREATENS OSU:
Michigan drops to tenth in poll

By The Associated Press
Despite beating Arizona and re-
ceiving one first-place vote, the

tackle position. Michigan Wolverines dropped two
"We have to play better offen- places, from eighth to tenth, in
sive football," Schepnbechler em- this week's Associated Press na-
phasized. "We have to be at least tional football poll.
a 400-yard team.'' Michigan fell The Texas Longhorns took a
-- - - - - --4 giant step toward regaining their

No. 1 national ranking Saturday
with a 56-15 rout of California.
They drew 16 first-place votes
in this week's poll to 14 for top-
rated Ohio State Monday, but
trailed. the Buckeyes in total
points 645-632. Last week. O h i o
' State led by 71 points.
The names of the Top Ten
teams are the salnA as ,last week,
although there were 'several posi-
tion changes. Stanford defeated
San Jose State, 34-3 and climbed
from fourth to third, replacing
Southern California, which battled
to a 21-all tie with Nebraska and
dropped to seventh.
Penn State's 55-7 walloping of
Navy pushed the Nittany Lions
from seventh to fourth. Missis-
sippi and Notre Dame remained
Ififth and sixth, the Rebels trounc-
ing Memphis State 47-13 and the
Irish beating Northwestern 35-14.
The top twenty teams, with first-
place votes in parentheses, season re-
cords and total points.
2. Ohio State (14) 0-0 645
2.STexas (16) 1-0 632
3, Stanford (1) 2-0 472
4. Penn State (2) 1-0 453
5. Mississippi (1) 1-0 420
6. Notre Dame 1-0 369
7. Southern Cal. (2) 1-0-1 368
Syracuse,
blacks to see
state officer
SYRACUSE (W) - Officials of
Syracuse University said Monday
they would meet Tuesday with the
state commissioner of human
rights, at his request, to discuss
charges of discrimination against
the footballcoaching staff filed
by suspended black athletes.
Robert J. Mangum, the human
rights, commissioner, sent a tele-
gram Friday to head. Coach Ben
,Schwartzwalder in which he said:
"Urgently request you restore
eight black football players to
the Syracuse squad and make
them eligible for participation in
Saturday's opening game pending
a resolution of the controversy."
The players were not reinstated
in time for the game against
Houston, which Syracuse lost
42-15.

S.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
24.

Nebraska
Missouri
Michigan (1)
Houston.
Arkansas
Florida
Oklahoma
UCLA
West Virginia
Tennessee
Colorado
Georgia Tech
Air Force

1-0-1
2-0
1-0
1-0
1-1
2-0
2-0
2-0
2-0
1-0
1-0
2-0
2-0

304
274
256
16i8
113
79
56
54
50
33
27
23
21

Blue hurls
nowhitter,
OAKLAND RP) --Oakland
rookie Vida Blue, a fastballing
21-year-old left-hander, tossed
a no-hitter at the Minnesota
Twins last night as the A's
trimmed the American League
West leaders 6-0.
The Twins, who needed a vic-
tory to clinch the West title,
t were stopped by the six-footer
from Mansfield, La., whose best
pitch was a fastbal mixed with
a sharp breaking curve.
With a crowd of 4,284 roaring
its approval, Blue calmly went
out-in the ninth and struck out
leadoff batter Danny Thompson
on four pitches. Pinch-hitter
Bob Allison struck out swinging
on a 2-2 pitch and Cesar Tovar
fouled out to Mincher.
Blue, 2-0, recalled from the
minors 18 days ago, twirled a
one-hitter only 10 days ago in
beating Kansas City in his sec-
and start.
Last night, the lefty with a
blazing fast ball, missed a per-
fect game when he allowed the
Twins their only runner-a
fourth inning two-out walk to
Harmon Killebrew. He struck
out nine.
TV R ENTA LS
$ .50 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREDLIVERY
AND SERVICE
CALL:
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662-5671,

OtAM5
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t o-i oids.f

-Associated Press
NOTRE DAME tackle Mike. Zikas (79) upends Northwestern
fullback Mike Adamle (34) in the second quarter of Saturday's
game at Evanston. The Irish downed the Wildcats, 33-14, to
remain fifth in this week's Associated Press football poll.
""".... ...:n.:ii.".".S:""I' <!:::"::":.Y: .":T.::^:':}"" ."'...; ": .' :"":r.. . "":::".
Professional League Standings
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE Western Divyision
National Conference Denver 1 0 0 1.000 25 10
'Eastern Division San Diego 0 1 0 .000 14 16
W L T Pct. Pts. Opp. Kansas City 0 1 0 .000 10 27
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 17 7 Oakland 0 1 0 .000 21 31
Washington 0 1 0 .000 17 26
N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 16 24 Weekend Results
St. Louis 0 1 0 .000 13 34 Cleveland 31, New York Jets 21
Philadelphia 0 1 0 .000 7 17 Los Angeles 34, St. Louis 13
C ntml i icn Chicago24. e' okGins1

nraL visio
Chicago 1 0 0 1.000 24 1
Minnesota 1 0 0 1.000 27 1
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 40 t
Green Bay 0 1 0 .000 0 4
Western Division
Los Angeles 1 0 0 1.000 34 1
Atlanta 1 0 0 1.000 14 3
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 26 1
New Orleans 0 1 0 .000 3 1

6
0
0
3
3
17
4

Atlanta 14, New Orleans 3
Dallas 17, Philadelphia 7
Denver 25, Buffalo 10
Detroit 40, Green Bay 0
Houston 19, Pittsburgh 7
Boston 27, Miami 14
Cincinnati 31, Oakland 21
Baltimore 16, San Diego 14
Minnesota 27, Kansas City 10
San Francisco 26, Washington 17

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American Conference
Eastern Division
Baltimore 1 0 0 1.000
Boston 1: 0 0 1.040
N.Y. Jets 0 1 0 .000
Miami 0 1 0 .000
Buffalo 0 1 0 .000
Central Division
Cincinnati 1 0 0 1.000
Houston 1 0 0 1.000
Cleveland 1 0 0 1.000
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000

I

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. ...

16
27
21
14
10
31
19
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7

14
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31
27
25
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The Detroit

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 8:00 P.M.
UNDERGRAD LIBRARY, MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM
REV. RICHARD R. FERNANDEZ
"THE UNITED STATES; LAST OF THE GREAT DINOSAURS"
PROF. DAVID WURFEL
"RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN SOUTHEAST ASIA"
RICHARD FERNANDEZ
National Director-Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam
Minister-United Church of Christ
Steering Committee Member for the 1968 Demonstrations at the Chicago Democratic
rConvention
Member of Steering Committee of the New Mobe

Symphony Orchestra'
SIXTEN EHRLING, Conductor; JUDITH RASKIN, Soprano
WILL BE PRESENTED BY THE
in HILL AUDITORIUM
SUNDAY, SEPT. 27, AT 2:30

*xclusive boot ait and heel-to-toe slant.

tii

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