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September 20, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

TODAY
Doors
Open
12:45

DIAL 8-6416

TODAY
Shows at
1-3-5-7-9 P.M.

Sunday, September 20, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

"EXTRAVAGANTLY F U N N Y performances by
Wilder, Griffith, and especially Sutherland !"
TIME MAGAZINE
"WHAT A PLEASURE TO, LAUGH! The actinvg to a
mat is wildly funny!"

U.S. fears Marxist growth in Latin America

"JUST FUNNY! JUST GREAT!"

"VERY FUNNY

... lush and lavish

Gene
Wilder
out of
"The
Producers"

"START THE
REVOLUTION
WITHOUT
ME"

CHICAGO TRIBUNE
-ICAGO SUN-TIMES
"
JUDITH CRIST
Donald
Sutherland
fresh, from
M*A*S*H

WASHINGTON OP) - American of-
ficials see the election victory of Marx-
ist Salvador Allende in Chile as rais-
ing the serious possibility that a major
bloc of Latin American nations may
come under Communist domination.
Countries rhentioned as possible
candidates for Communist influencc', in
addition to Chile, were listed as Peru,
Bolivia, and Argentina.
A prominent American official gave
this assessment Wednesday to a group
of Midwestern publishers, editors and
broadcasters at a White House-spon-
sored background briefing in Chicago.
Under ground rules set by the ad-
ministration, the official could not be
identified or quoted directly and his
remarks were withheld from publication
until yesterday evening.

The administration official predict-
ed Allende's election, barring some ex-
traordinary development.
If Allende wins, he said, there is a
good chance he would, over a period of
years, establish some sort of Commun-
ist government.
In that case, he went on, Communism
in the hemisphere would not be con-
fined to Cuba which has traditionally
had but a small impact on Latin Amer-
ica affairs, but would be extended to
a major mainland nation.
The official said a Communist Chile
might be joined, for example, by al-
ready divided Argentina, with which
it shares a common frontier; by Peru,
described as heading in directions that
have been difficult to deal with; and
by Bolivia, which the official said has

been moving in a leftist, anti-United
States direction.
Anti-Communists in the hemisphere,
he said, should not delude themselves
that an Allende presidency would not
present massive problems not only for
the United States but for other hemis-
phere countries.
It is one of those situations, he de-
clared, which is not too happy for
American interests. He said the United
States is keeping a close watch on de-
velopments but that, at this point, its
capacity to influence events in Chile
is not very great.
A Communist-ruled Chile, he said,
would render extremely problematical
the future of the Organization of
American States and the Western
Hemisphere Defense Board.

President Nixon participated in the
session but was not present when Al-
lende's victory was discussed..
Although Allende did not win a
popular-vote majority in the Chilean
victory, he topped a slate of t h r e e
candidates and is expected to be elect-
ed president by his country's Congress
next month.
In other developments, the Inter-
American Press Association charged
yesterday that Communist pressures al-
ready are beginning to strangle the news
media. It said threats of violence and
intimidation are causing sales of news-
papers and radio stations, resignations
of news officials and dismissal of anti-
Marxist newsmen, along with upheav-
als within press-related trade unions.
The organization added that those

practicing intimidation already h a v e
gained control over all of Chile's non-
government television channels.
Meanwhile, is an army day message
yesterday, President Eduardo Frei re-
minded the armed forces that one of
their main jobs is to safeguard freedom
and democracy.
"I am sure the armed forces will con-
tinue 'to be the safeguards of the
country's internal and external security,
whatever the situations it will have to
live through or face," the president said.
Frei's words echoed the line adopted,
by hisuChristian Democrat party, to
make sure the armed forces stand up to
any attempt by a future Allende ad-
ministration to turn Chile into a Marx-
ist state.

ANTONIONI'S TWO ENGLISHI
MASTERPIECES-THROUGH

LANGUAGE
TUESDAY

BLOW-UP is SO
STUNNING THAT YOU WANT TO SEE IT MORE
THAN ONCE"-N.Y. POST

'BEST
FILM
OF-
19661"
Notiona
society
of film Critics

d
A Corlo Pond ti odvction
Antonioni's
BLOW-UP:
Vanessa Redgrave
David Hemmings "Sarah Miles
COLOR'
fCOMOEO FOR CATURtAUIECES
A Premier Productions Co, Inc. Releose

"BLOW!UP"-Sun., 2:50, 6:30, 10:10-Mon., Tues., 9:00 only
"ZABRISKIF,"-Sun., 4:40, 8:20-Mon., Tues., 7:10 only
''ANTONIONI AT HIS CREATIVE BEST!"
-Cue Magazine
"CHILLING! It's Embarrassing that a Foreigner Can
Take a Quick Look and See What Ails Us While We
} Are Still Lost in Our Fallacies."
--Jon Clemens, The Record
"REVOLUTIONARY! It's So Beautifully Mode, So
Beautifully Constructed, and It Has Such a Powerful
Ending. I Want to See it Again."
-Jonas Mekas, Village Voice
ANTOIONI's
II'U I 111I
p WM ,j<[r{

newsbriefs I
By The Associated Press
SEN. GEORGE McGOVERN (D-SD) said yesterday he was
"thinking seriously about becoming a Democratic presidential
candidate in 1972."
The South Dakota dove, who made an unsuccessful bid for the
Democratic nomination in 1968, said he would defer a decision until
after the 1970 congressional elections.
COMMUNIST GUERRILLAS opened an attack yesterday on a
2,000 man Cambodian army column preparing to resume a
northward push in the government's first major offensive of the
war.
Radio messages from advance elements of the column said the
guerrillas were attacking government forces at a point about 50 miles,
north of Phnom Penh, where communist troops brought the offensive
to a halt last Monday.
For a second day, the press was barred from the front and news-
men speculated that this was intended to keep them from witnessing
intensified U.S. air strikes in support of the offensive.
*.* *
OPPONENTS OF PRESIDENT NIXON'S welfare reform
bill are convinced they now have the votes to keep it bottled up
in the Senate Finance committee.
Sen. John J. Williams, (R-Del.) the senior Republican on the
committee rand a foe of the bill said yesterday he strongly doubts the
committee will approve the bill this session.-
* * *w
TWO WESTERN GROWER organizations have announced
plans to fight Cesar Chavez's nationwide boycott of lettuce sold
without the label of his United Farm Workers Organizing Coms-
nitte.
The. California Council of Growers and the Western Growers
Associatioin announced a campaign Friday to convince growers and
the general public that their lettuce is also union-produced under:
Teamster's' union contracts.
Chavez has termed the Teamsters agreement "sweetheart con-
tracts" and has called for a boycott in 64 cities "until the last lettuce
grower is signed."
A JETLINER WAS HIJACKED to Havana yesterday by a a
man who originally demanded the plane fly to Cairo so he could t
help the Palestinian guerrillas.
The unidentified hijacker, who said he was a Marxist and on b
leave from the Marine Corps, took over the Boeing 727 carrying 90 S
passengers soon after it took off from Pittsburgh on a flight to0
Boston.
According to the planes pilot, John, Harkin, it was during the
stopover that the crew talked the hijacker out of the flight to Cairo1
on the grounds that the plane did not have enough fuel or proper s
flight charts. u

ist state.

collegye
SAN DIEGO, Calif. (1") - The
University of California's "Third
College" - described by the cata-
logue as a study of social prob-
lems and by a state legislator as
an "experiment in racism"-opens
Monday with 200 underprivileged
students, half from m i n o r i t y
groups.
A Califlornia assemblyman, John
Stull, contends the courses range
"from straight' Mickey Mouse to
thinly veiled racism, with a smat-
tering of legitimate courses thrown

-Associated Press
Pre-attack calm~

Palestinian guerrillas stroll past a land rover in the streets of Ramtha, yesterday, a few hours bey'
fore Jordanian armed forces attacked the city. A guerrilla communique broadcast by Radio Bagh-
dad subsequently claimed guerrillas had beaten off the attack.
250 PARTICIPANTS
The student-run Course Mart:
Making and taking your own class

By DAVID EGNER
Professors aren't the only ones
at the University who can start
courses for credit. Students scan,
too.
They've started Military in
Modern America, Environmental
Studies, Counter-Culture and six
others this semester.
Thanks to the Course Mart, a
student-run program which began
to offer courses in spring term
1969, LSA students with a faculty
sponsor and a professor or grad-
uate student willing to teach a

enrolled in Course Mart classes ac-
cording to Course Mart co-ordi-
nator Scott Bass '70. Bass says
there weren't enough Course Mart
places this term to accommodate
all interested students. He says
two courses-Philosophy of Sci-
ence Fiction and Photographic
Expression - were "closed five
minutes after registration began"
September 1. Six courses are now
filled, he adds.
Course Mart instructors are all
volunteers; Bass explains, because
"we don't have any money to pay

PWTH POPUM STARTS WEDNESDAY
FIFTH"AVENUE AERLUIy IA HE
111DOWNTOWN ANN Anson "RIDER ON TH--AINI"
1NFORMATION 76137Q00 H n

mamme

UN ION-LEAGUE

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+a:s::'rs:iii:r::: a :,.;.:4'
GET YOUR MAN WITH A
SWantAd

- class can submit course proposals; teachers."
to, the student-faculty Course,
Mart committee for approval. If money doesn't draw instruc-.
And if a course is approved both tors to teach Course Mart courses,
by Course Mart and by the literary what does?
college curriculum committee, it "I wanted to teach students
becomes a regular college offering. about the law and how to deal
About 250 students are currently with police," says Charles Aver-

broo k, Law '72, who teaches Legal
Rights and, Police Practices.
Averbrook adds, "It will do them
good if they go on to law school
and even if they don't. But thef
University doesn't offer any un-
dergrad law courses. So I decided
to."
John Goodsped, '71, says that
class "is a very interesting course,
and the only one of its type." He
says readings for the courseare
"as' hard or harder", than those
of other courses he has taken.
Bass says he does not know
how many courses will be offered
by Course Mart in the Wint er
term.
He said students who want to
start new courses should submit
their proposals to the S t u d e n t
Counseling Office by November
12.
One problem plaguing the
Course Mart is lack of publicity,
Bass says. Students who want to
see what, courses are being of-
fered by Course Mart must go to
the Student Gounseling Office be-
caus? Course Mart classes are or-
ganized too late to meet the dead-
line for inclusion in the LS&A
catalogue, Bass explains.
603 E. Liberty
DIAL 5-6290
Doors Open 12:45

Others, however; disagree.
The catalogue of the new college
-as yet unnamed-says the aim
is the ,"study and alleviation of
social problems." To start, "the
relevance of science to human
lives":is being studied as well as
"the dimensions of the urban
crisis," understanding non-West-
ern cultures and nations and com-
munication.
School officials say students can
choose from four majors: science
and technology, urban and rural
development, Third World Studies
and' communications.
The school was proposed to uni-
versity regents7 by faculty of the
6,000-student University of Cali-
fornia at San Diego in January as
a seven-year experiment to draw
low-income minority students with
three qualities: motivation, per-
sistence and potential.
Only half of the students who
applied to the "Third College"
were ,admitted the first year. Of
those half would never have been
accepted by the university 1 as t
year because of course and grade
requirements, says a university,
spokesman.
The formerly inadmissible stu-
dents made it under a special UC
waiver, used to bring in minority
students and,# those considered
economically disadvantaged. They
include black athletes and music-
ians regarded as assets to t h e
academic community but unquali-
fied 'scholastically.
Ninety per cent of the f i r s t
students are getting some financ-
ial support, either grants of the
federally and state funded Edu-
cational Opportunity Program or
federal loans. A school aspokes-
man says at least 70 per cent of
the students are from neighbor-
hoods poorer than the university
average.
Provost Joseph Watson, 30, a
black born in Harlem, has been a
chemistry professor on the San
Diego campus since 1966. Last
year. he was the only black teach-
er on campus.. Now,he says, half
of the eight transfers and nine
new faculty members in the new
college are nonwhite.
Watson isn't concerned about
getting a formal name for the
school.
"Maybe we'll have a, name four
years from now when the first
class graduates and can help find
the right one" he said.

~flies the 747 to Madrid

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The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
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Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
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Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
Aty year. Subscription rates: $10 by
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Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail. ,

,
r

I

*

1U NIGHTS FIRST CLASS HOTEL-double occupancy
2 MEALS PER DAY (breakfast and dinner)

* TRANSFERS TO AND FROM MILAN AIRPORT
* 7 DAYS OF FREE LIFTS
*free bus transportation in area for duration

<. ~ Jack
wauff,
The
Odd
C546
'PMAVM'-' AND .rr

Haircuts that
don't look
like haircuts
TRY US-
DASCOLA
DM BARBERS

2complete

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