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September 20, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-20

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-Daily-Tom Gottlieb
Hugh Masakela and the Lost Poets appeared in concert last night in Crisler Arena. Benefits from the event are to aid

BAM in their efforts to promote black studies and admissions on campus.
Festival exemplifies Musicians
NEW YORK-"He was a good Hend
friend of mine and I will miss the
him," singer Janis Joplin said to th
when told of guitarist Jimi Hen- unde
By JUANITA ANDERSON drix, death in London Friday. his h
And she cried. Lond
TT~,,nri~ri n rila -A an t a~irioy nrth RralrArk ac~x l --'-

mourn Hendrix

,oeUpon entering Crisler arena azurday for the Biacx arcs FesTivai, Rc uiin cost
VP~l eiueui~IJ~~tJĀ£1~L1 ~ALLLUV. j~ ~ ~Rock musicians across the
,one immediately felt a great sense of unity and free expression among country mourned the loss of a
-veryone present. rare talent and a brilliant
Through the excellent directing of Ron Thompson and coordina- guitarist.
tion of artist Jon Lockard, the Black Action Movement (BAM) "He was an innovator," said
successfully presented 36 black artists and merchants from the Miss Joplin from a California
Detroit and Chicago areas. recording studio. "He made
The festival proved to be a great learning experience because everyone in the music business
the artists not only presented their works, but also spoke freely on aware that the public was ready
the expresion of black thought. for and really wanted free musi-
cal expression. He showed them
One of the most representative exhibits of the festival was that it wasn't just delusion. It,
George Norman's Black Odyssey. The Odyssey is an artistic and was a reality."
historical account of the Afro-American from slavery to the present. British musician John Mayall
Norman says that his work started by accident; I was trying to fill a called Hendrix' contribution
ne5ed to say things relevant to black people. I only planned to do a "monumental."
little in the beginning, but people liked it and inspired me to do more "The cat was definitely the
things. Black history is the struggles to triumph in spite of being main man," said drummer Bud-
black." Norman described Black Odyssey as a story of the tears, dy Miles, formerly with Hen-
the lynchings, and the struggle to overcome bigotry,,prejudice, dis- leader of the Buddy Miles Band.
crimination, and depression of the black man. Hendrix, 27, was found in a
"I tried to show what it's like to be black in an alien society. It coma in a London apartment
is important to talk about our humanity as well as our country." rented by 23-year-old Minika
The Odyssey begins with a letter to black youth and a quote Dannermann, a beautiful Ger-
from .W.E.B. Dubois which truly expresses the theme of the exhibit. man blonde. A post mortem
"The tragedy is that men know so little of men." examination was scheduled to-
Norman considers his segment on Malcolm X the most important day, followed by a coroner's in-
part :of his exhibit. It is of a man who has experienced all of the pain ques pobably tomorrow. lead
and oppression of virtually every black man. Norman quotes Malcolm, singer with the group called the
"When I was in. the eighth grade, they asked me what I wanted to Animals and a friend of Hen-
become. I told them I wanted to study law, but they told me law was drix, said: "All I know is that
not a suitable profession for a Negro. They suggested I go into he had taken some sleeping
something else-like carpentry." Malcolm had also expressed one of tablets." Burden added that
the black man's most pertinent problems, "so-called Negro progress." Miss Dannermann had found
Norman felt that one of the problems with history is that it
tends to play up already well known people. In the exhibit he attempts
to refrain from this by picturing important people who are not as
'well known, from black scientists to black mothers.
Norman, as did many other artists of the festival stressed the
importance of educating black children. rese
In speaking with two children, Angela Simpson, 6, and Beth
Mays, 9, it was evident that they were greatly impressed by the black
art which was represented. They especially enjoyed Jon Lokhard's Rseve
painting "The Fluptist," a beautiful work of a black child in white
gown playing a flute against a yellow background.
The main complaint of the black artists on the festival was the "THEHONE
time limit. provided and the fact that few people turned out for the
festival. Jon Lockard expressed it well. "The city of Ann Arbor lost
.an opportunity for new exposure by not supporting us. White people *
applaud our football and basketball players. It is time they see and
appreciate us as we really are." Sept. 18, 19, 20

night
conta
could
er's I
unlik
ralial
He:
musi
ruly
he us
them
open
mind
they
had
that,
need
He
audi
UnitE
cordi
ple H
nigh
sys."
Jo
"Jin
body
peop
He j
did
it we
Pa
Garf
You
Ther
end.

[rix in a coma and called
ambulance. She was taken
*e home of friends and put
r sedation. Hendrix made
ast public appearance at a
on jazz club Wednesday
t. "We had been trying to
act him for three days but
d not," said one of the sing-
British agents. "It was very
:e him. He was usually very
tble."
ndrix, who featured wild
c, swiveling his and an un-
Afro hairstyle, once said
sed drugs but had outgrown
a. "The drug scene ... was
ing up things in people's
ds, giving them things that
just couldn't handle," he
said. "Well music can do
you know, and you don't
any drugs."
played to standing-room
fnces in Europe and t he
ed States and made such re
Ing hits as "Hey Joe," "Pur-
laze," "Burning of the Mid-
t Lamp" and "Band of Gyp-
hnny Winter, guitarist said
i didn't try to copy any-
. He was one of the greatest
le for weaving spells .
ust picked up a guitar and
it. It wasn't like a voice,
as more like his soul."
ul Simon, of Simon and
funkel: "He was real good.
can't measure those things.
re's no summation at the
People liked him. I don't

want to think too much about
it. It already brought me down
for the day."
Bill Graham, rock music im-
pressario: "He was a brilliant
innovative guitar player, song
writer and producer of records
... a great talent. He was very
rare. Few artists tried to imi-
tate him. . . He had a certain
bravura. He invented sounds
with the use of his guitar that
were incredible, like at Wood-
stock when he played the Star
Spangled. Banner. You could
hear the rockets, feel the battle.
He moved all those people by his
artistry and his visual presence.
Corner State & Liberty
OPEN 12:45
Feature at 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
Watch
the
landlord
THE MIRISCH
PRODUCTION COMPANY presents
A NORMAN JEWISON.
HALASHBY PRODUCTION
LANDOLORI
COLOR by DeLuxe'
L s United Artists
* DIAL 662-6264 *

Sunday, September 20, 1970
THE WALRUS
AND
ANDThe Carpenter
Have Already Purchased Their Season Tickets-HAVE YOU?
UNIVERSITY
PLAYERS present
PLAYBILL '70'7
THE CAUCASIAN CHALK CIRCLE
bertolt brecht
October 7-1 0-Trueblood Theatre
A MODERN ODYSSEY a play from the BLACK THEATRE
kazontzakis to be announced
November 4-7-Trueblood December 2-5-Lydia Mendelssohn
TIMON OF ATHENS
shakespeare
January 27-30-Trueblood
THE DEVILS THE REFUSAL
whiting a premiere!
February 17-20--Trueblood March 17-20-Trueblood
THE GIRL FROM MAXIM'S
georges feydeau
April 7-10-Mendelssohn
SEASON TICKETS: s8 $11=$
TICKET INFORMATION:
The Box Office will open for Season Subscription sales from Sept. 28 to Oct. 10.
Thereafter it will be open weeks of performance ornly, Monday and Tuesday,
12:30-5:00; Wednesday thru Saturday, 12:30-8:00. Mail orders will be filled
prior to the opening of the Box Office.
PRICES: (SEASON SUBSCRIPTIONS OFFER SAVINGS AND PREFERRED
LOCATIONS)
Season Subscription: REGULAR: (Wed. and Thurs.) -$8.00, $11.00
WEEKEND (Fri. and Sat.)-$11.00, $14.00
MIXED> (weekdays and weekends mixed)-add
50c for each Friday or Saturday ticket
ordered to regular season price above
INDIVIDUAL TICKETS: WED. and THURS.-$2.00, $1.50

FRI. and SAT.-$2.50, $2.00
NOTE: The higher priced tickets are the first 17 rows of orchestra and first 4 rows
of balcony.
ALL PERFORMANCES AT 8:00 P.M. SHARP! LATECOMERS WILL BE SEATED AT THE CONVENIENCE
OF THE AUDIENCE. NO REFUNDS. EXCHANGES, WHEN POSSIBLE, UNTIL 4:00 P.M. DAY OF PER-
FORMANCE.
MENDELSSOHN BOX OFFICE: 668-6300 TRUEBLOOD BOX OFFICE: 764-5387
ORDER BLANK SEASON SUBSCRIPTION
Weekend L
NAME Regular -7
MIXED L
Please ADDRESS
Print INDIVIDUAL TICKETS
Prefer Orchestra Q
PHONFZIP Balcony Q
Are you on our mailing list? Faculty Q Student Q Ann Arbor Q Q Visitor
WED. Thur. Fri. Sat. No. Price Office Use
CIRCLE I~ I i___________________________
ODYSSEY, __ _____ __ ______________
BLACK __
TIMON
DEVILS
PREMIERE
MAXIM'S ____ __
TOTAL (Season Price or Individual Tickets) for mixed season add 50c for each

}

4

*,,

nts
It Sykes
YDRIPPER"
50
Doors Open
at 7:30

. 6... .. ^'ll

GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE-
Monday, Sept. 21
Noon Luncheon-35c

Fri, Sad., Sun.

*
0

11

COMING-

TED
Dir. Office

KACHEL
of Religious Affairs

"Drugs & Religious Experience"

THE 1st INTERNATIONAL
BLUEGRASS FOLK FESTIVAL

i s

_ - El. ,

Sat.-Sun., Sept. 19-20
RASHOMON
dir. AKIRA KUROSAWA (1951)
"The classic film statement of the relativism
-the unknowability-of truth."
-Pauline Kael

i

FRI.-SAT.-SUN., OCT. 2, 3, & 4
FRONTIER CITY PARK-ONSTED, MICH.
f "
RALPH STANLEY JIMMY MARTIN
Mac Wiseman, J.D. Crowe, Del McCourey,

I

101

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