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September 18, 1970 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-18

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Page Two

owl

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday; September 18, 1970

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, September 18, 1970 V

TV's celluloid Tarzan
loses his grapevine

records

4

The Gold Rush is just beginning

By LEE KIRK
Aaaaa AAA aaathud!
For some of you this may
indicate tarzan . .. or perhaps
a bunch of anacin on the way
to the headache, but for mil-
lions of kiddies with bugged-
out eyes who sit mesmerized in
front of the TV on Saturday
morning, it is the battle cry. of
that jungle lord of Mmbwebwe
province, George of the Jungle.
But, alas and alack, this ear-
splitting war howl will be heard
no more. The George of the
Jungle Show has been shelved
by ABC, and pop culture freaks
everywhere 'have suffered an
irreparable loss. No longer will
the Saturday hangover be light-
ened by the sight of George
swinging majestically on a
grapevine - right into a tree.
No longer will thousands of
kiddies cheer the exploits of
Henry Cabot Henhouse III,
known to the underprivileged
few as Super Chicken. No long-
er will hero-worshippers cheer
to the red-blooded exploits of
Tom Slick as he overcomes the
forces of evil to win race after
race.
As the star of the show, George
got all the best lines, except for
a few that went to the narrator.
For those fortunate enough to
have never seen George, he was
strong-armed and strong-head-
ed bumbler stumbled and tumb-
led to triumphs over real estate
developers and all others who
threatened his jungle domain.
He believed his elephant, Shep,
was a "doggie" (and so did
Shep), and poor George .called
his mate Ursula "that long-
haired fellow who doesn't
shave." Whatever.
His friends incude Leon the
Lion, who likes George because
"George once pulled thorn from
Leon's paw," and Seymour, the
man-eating Venus flytrap who
befriended the jungle lord af-
ter, yep, you guessed it, -George
pulled a paw from Seymour's
thorn.
George gets his brain power
from Ape the Ape, who banters

on in the King's English much
like Arthur Treacher. Ape is
the straight man, which is kind
of hard when you're a hunched-
ed-over gorilla. Whatever.
Any true George fan will never
forget that frightful moment
when the evil villain got George
under the hood of his car, and
the announcer nooted that
George seemed to be in his oily
clutch.
Super Chicken, in real life,
millionaire play-chicken Henry
Cabot Henhouse III, and his
faithful companion Fred, a
chicken-hearted, feather-brain-
ed lion, fought such nasty peo-
ple as the Easter Bunny Bandit
and the evil magician Me r iin
Brando, but their humor was not
so belly-oriented as George's.
Still, they did have their mo-
ments.
Every time Super Chicken and
Fred were flying around in their
Super Coop in search of the vil-
lain of the week, there was an
exchange that went something
like this:
Super Chicken: Well, Fred,
they should be down there
somewhere.

Tom is often racing his car,
the Thunderbolt Grease-slap-,
per, for nothing other than the
pure joy of competition, al-
though on occasion he goes out
to pay off the mortgage on Ger-
tie's garage. Natch.
Tom is so mucl the ultimate
hero type, incapable of a nasty
word or an evil act, that all he
can say to the alluring Mari.
gold is, "Gee, Marigold, you're a
regular fellow."
Tom's nemesis was usually
that "cheater and all-around
bad sport," Baron Otto Matic, a
classic bad guy, who always
dressed in black and spoke with
a thick German accent. Occa-
sionally, Tom would race against
other poor losers, most notably
the sneaky sheik of Arabique,
How-ya-been Booby. No matter
how hard the evil foe cheated,
Tom a n d the Thunderbolt
Grease-slapper w o u l d charge
from far behind "like an aveng-
ing aardvark" and win at the
wire.
And at the end of the show,
the credits roll by thousands of
bloodshot eyes as George is be-
ing mugged by an irate plant.
Despite this adversity, George
keeps that old jungle spirit and
flashes the peace sign before
finally being devoured.
But all this is no more. George
is gone, replaced by Sky Hawks,
and Saturday mornings will
never be the same. Every time I
realize I may never see George
go headlong into another jungle
tree, it brings a tear to my eye
and a lump to my head. What-
ever.
Saturday mornings have been
overwhelmed by the synthetic,-
even the Lone Ranger is a car-
toon, and they no longer use the
real music from the William Tell
Overture. George of the Jungle
was an honest attempt at sick
humor, and sometimes it suc-
ceeded.
At least there's. still Bull-
winkle. Whatever.

By HAROLD SMITH
Neil Young is a musical para-
dox. He can perform as part of
a band one night and solo the
next, and do both with the skill
and quality few musicians pos-
sess today. As a writer he has
penned some outstanding ma-
terial not only for himself but
for the groups he has perform-
ed with. The question whether
Neil Young needs Crosby and
Co. or Crosby and Co. needs Neil
Young is easily answerable af-
ter listening to the new Reprise
1.p., After the Gold Rush. This
album shows, even more than
his previous two albums, that
Neil Young is one of the best
solo performers in the business
and shoud CSN&Y go on their
separate ways, Young will not
suffer.
Musically, After the G o I d
Rush is an excellent album.
The bands were done live in the
studio and for this reason the
feel and drive of the music is
not lost in countless tracking
machines: Neil Young absolute-
ly refuses to have his material;
double and triple tracked. The
album is almost entirely accous-
tical with only two cuts, "South-
ern Man" and "When I Dance"
being heavy electrical material.
Young plays lead guitar a n d
handles the vocals, using his
unmistakeable tenor voice to
give every song an unbelievable
degree of feeling.
Backing up Young is his three
member band Crazy Horse. First
appearing on his second album,
Crazy Horse consists of a bass
player, drummer and an excel-
lent guitarist who, together,
complement Neil Young's fine
musicianship.

Fred: Why don't
your super-vision,
Chicken?

you use
Super

S.C.: Look, Fred, if I had
any supervision, do you think
they'd let my fly around in
this coop with a lion?
F: Gee, I wish I had super-
vision.
S.C.: Gosh, Fred, I do the
best I can for you.
Whatever.
Tom Slick was by far the
driest of the three episodes
belched up on every. George
show, but at the same time, it
was the most satirical. T o m
Slick is the super-hero's super-
hero. ie is so true blue and pure
and uncorruptable and whole-
some that you could swear Frank
Merriwell was still with us.
Tom's biggest fans are Marigold,
a blue-eyed blonde, who con-
stantly flutters her mascara at
Tom, and Gertie Growler, a
caustic old bag.

Also appearing on this album
is ex-CSN&Y bassist Greg
Reeves and pianist Nils Lofgren
whose piano can be heard on
every band.
On a lyrical basis. Young ap-
pears to write in three distinct
styles. One is typified in the
cut "Tell Me Why" where the
lyric is extremely straightfor-
ward and beautiful in its sem-
ing simplicity:
Tell me lies later / Come and
see me
I'll be alone for awhile
I am lonely but / You can free
me
All in the way that you smile
The second style.,employed by
Young is the use of surrealistic
lyrics. This type is evidenced
in the title song "After the Gold
Rush". There is a dreamy qual-
ity about these lyrics with their
meaning known only to the
writer himself:
I was lying in a burned out
basement,
With the full moon in my eyes.
I was hoping for replacement,
When the sun burst thru the
sky.
With the lyrics in "Southern
Man", like those in the CSN&Y
single "Ohio", we see Neil
Young as a songwriter making
a strong social comment. "Sou-
thern Man" is probably the best
cut on the album. The music is
heavy, with 'a constant, infec-
tious beat and the lyrics are in-
cindiary:
I saw cotton and I saw black
Tall white mansions,
And little shacks.
Southern man when will you
Pay them back?
I heard screamin' and bull-
* Back by popular
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whips cracking.
How long? How long?
Neil Young blends his own
style of music with his sensi-
tive lyrics and the end product
is a masterpiece. The only prob-
lem with an album of this caliber
is that we must now wait ano-
ther year for Neil Young to
put out a fourth album in his
career as a fine solo perform-
er. It will be interesting to see
how Steven Still's long awaited
solo album will compare to his
fellow band member's. It is
no secret that Stills and Young
more than dislike each other
and that they are always trying
to musically show each other
up. With the release of After
the Gold Rush, Steve Stills will
have to go some if he hopes to
match Neil Young as a solo per-
former. We're waiting.
TV RENTALS
$10.50 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671
N'

I ________________________________.--_____________ I

0

I

SUNDAY, SEPT., 20
B nai Brith
5:00-SRAELI, FOLK DANCING
BUZZY GORDON: Leader
6:00-DELI HOUSE
(The Best Kosher food in AA)
8: 00- -FOLK 'CONCERT
10:800

i
i

~B~fly ou&B
presents
Roosevelt Sykes
"THE HONEYDRIPPER"
$2.53
Sept. 18, 19, 20 Doors Open
Fri., Sal., Sun. at 7:30

It

4

,4

h

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
a',ec by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764=0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day throughsSunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates, $10 by
carrier. $10 by mail.
Stummer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $S. by carrier, $5 by mail.

BOB WHITE
". .a fullness and
sensitivity e q u a I to
anyone performing folk
music today."
-Michigan Daily
NEXT WEEK-
JEFF GUTHRIE

TODAY
Doors
Open
6:45

DIAL 8-6416

TODAY
Shows at
7, 9 P.M.

"EXTRAVAGANTLY F U N N Y performances by
Wilder, Griffith, and especially Sutherland!"
TIME MAGAZINE
"WHAT A PLEASURE TO LAUGH! The acting to a
man is wildly funny!"

I

AT LAST I
It's kick-off weekend for Ann Arbor's new rock spot that has
what you've been looking for. Thursday, Friday, and Saturday,
September 17, 18, 19 at the ODYSSEY you'll enjoy and dance to
Ann Arbor's favorite rock groups. No cover. No minimum. Food
and liquor 'til 2 a.m.
Thursday-9:30-1:30-LOVE'S ALCHEMY
Friday-9:30-1:30-LEAVES OF GRASS
Saturday-5-7 (after game Happy Hours)-LOVE'S ALCHEMY
9:30-1:30-LOVE'S ALCHEMY
THE. ODYSSEY-208 W. Huron

"JUST FUNNY! JUST GREAT!"
Cl-
"VERY FUNNY . . . lush and lavish

i

$1.50
1421 RiIISTRET
ir6i i4SO

Gene
Wilder

"START THE
REVOLUTION
WITHOUT
ME"

CHICAGO TRIBUNE
HICAGO SUN-TIMES
JUDITH GRIST
Donald
Sutherland
fresh from
MB'A*S*H~

"'MASH'IS THE BEST
AMERICAN WAR
COMEDY SINCE
SOUND CAME,
IN*" New Yorker

I

ME and MY BROTHER
IN COLOR
directed by Robert Frank, with Allen Ginsberg, Alan Chaikin
"Occasionally shocking in its graphic presentations of sex in all
forms, but completely involving and finally profoundly moving in
the humane dignity of its understanding. Robert Frank's first
feature film, in color, is a masterful achievement, establishing
him as one of the most promising of America's young under-
overground directors.
A BRILLIANTLY EXCITING FILM."
- ~----Variety
Fri., Sept. 18 and Sat., Sept. 19
7-9:15-1 1:30 P.M.
NEWMAN CENTER
331 Thompson betw. William and Liberty
contribution $1

I

out of
"The
Producers"

NO
now

I

603 E. Liberty
NOW!_j
- -
Doors open at 12:45
DIAL 5-6294*
S--.- .-- -- -~
- 1- *
X -Jl~t - -,
Ii t t -- - - - --1--,-.-+

I

~

yp

Watch
the landlord
1 get his.

24t+Cetvt ' U 5 r,
An Ingo Preminger Production
DONALD SUTHERLAND ELLIOTT GOULD TOM SKERRITT
Co $taAg SALLY FEtRMAN ROER DUVALL -JO ANN M tG- IENE AUERIONOtS
Produced by Directed by Screenplay by - ,
INGO PREMINGER ROBERT ALTMAN RING LARONER, Jr. byN
r aC nn00eI bi' 5CHRD HO0KER MusiC by JOHNNY MANDEL I ". ..,
Color by DE LUXES PANAVISION* -
NOW SHOWING
SHOW TIMES
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782 7:00-9:10
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor SATURDAY and SUNDAY
Box office open 6:30 '1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:30
Join The Daily Sports Staff
f

mo

Corner State & Liberty Sts.
DIAL 662-6264

} .. r >
t?< i

OPEN 12:45 P.M. SHOWS AT 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
THE LANDLORD'S GETTING JUST ABOUT
EVERYTHING BUT THE RENT

Wedattnau
are
The 04Cul
r
y;,

P-1-munt Picturoro nt.%
HEAL WALL/S
ft*oocno,4
Make love! t ~
Fall over.,
laughing'! !.-'

I

3 GRIPPING NOW PLAYS!

"TH LADLOD" S about:
Wasps. The military- Rent parties. ; Arrows dipped in
industrial complex. ,Fanny's barbeque sauce.
t t I /
I t t

.lji

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3.
r

4

I

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---------------
An attempted Margie's pot liquor DuBois' school
axe murder. and palm readings. in the cellar.
f ® / ( .

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Li.

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