100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 16, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, 5epfember I b, IV lug

i

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, september 10, 1 '9 fy ~

_I

1..."*

Regents to consider 'U' media

i
i
G
Ik

SEVEN INJURED:
Panthers, New Orleans
police exchange gunfire

(Continued from Page 1) sibility of newspapers to express
used so we do not substantially their views on the issues of the
distort the tone of what's going day."
on," Hirschman continued. "In "There is, in fact, in this coun-
general, though, we've tried to try and in this time," Hirschman
curtail the use of obscenities to continued, "debate over whether
minimize the possibility of offend- or not violence is an acceptable
ing a substantial segment of our or necessary meanls for effecting
readership." change. I find indefensible the
Some of the Regents also dis- notion that we should shy away
agreed with The Daily running from this debate or refuse to
editorials favoring violence as a print the views of those staff
means for change. members or other writers who be-
"We are all through with this lieve that violence will be neces-
business of violence and breaking sary."
things up," Cudlip said. "Yes - Lastly, the Regents condemned
that's gone and we won't tolerate the Daily's news coverage and re-
any more." porting accuracy.
Responding to the sharp at- "The Daily is a propaganda
tacks, Hirschman said that it is i sheet for a small group of stul
the "traditional right and respon- dents," Cudlip said.
Knauss call for U'
neut ralityinpolities

Agreeing with Cudlip, Smith
said that the Daily "weaves fact
and opinion in and out of their
stories."
Hirschman, in response to the
charges of news bias and inaccur-
acy said that The Daily is staffed
"primarily by people with little
experience in journalism."
"Although editors have always
stressed very high standards of
accuracy and fairness, I would
be the first to admit that we have
the publication of incorrect facts
frequently failed, resulting in thei
publication of incorrect facts and
distortions of the positions of peo-
ple in the stories," Hirschman
continiued. "We are anxious to cor-
rect such errors when they are
brought to our attention, 'and we
have done so with almost embar-
rassing frequency."
Hirschman agreed that the
structure of The Daily could tend,
in the short run, to perpetuate a
certain political philosophy on the
part of the paper.
But he added that "structually,
at least, the staff of the paper
continues to remain open to all
Universitysstudents." He also said
the editors had "recently taken
steps to encourage staff discussion
of and participation in the broad
policy question facing The Daily
as an institution."
"It's my hope that this activity
will lead to some kind of demo-
craticization of the internal work-
ings of The Daily," he said.
Throughout all discussions about
the Daily, those Regents inter-
viewed emphasized they were "not
trying to threaten The Daily."'
Regent Paul Goebel (R-Grand
Rapids), perhaps the stauchest.
critc of The Daily, declined to
comment in a telephone interview.
President Robben Fleming also
declined to comment.

AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information cal
971-3700
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips/Day

BOWLING

4Cc
9 A.M.-Noon
, Mon.-Sat.

Leagues Forming
Sig Up Now

(Continued from Page 1)
guilt don't pose as a revolution-
Ross, the final speaker, main-
tained that "Tlxe University pre-
scently is an effective agent for,
social change, although m o s t
changes go counter to those values
we would like to see." The Uni-
Daily Official Bulletin
(Continued from Page 2)
Physics Colloquium: L. Wolfenstein,'
"Present Status of the Theory of Weak
Interaction," P&A Colloq. Rnm.,;4 p.m.
Chem. & Met. Engineering Computer
Lectures: Series of six 2 hr. lects., Prof.
Carnhan, "An Introduction to Com-
puters, the FORTRAN IV Lang. and
the M.T.S.7, Nat. Sc. Aqd., 7:30-9:30
p.m.
Degree Recital: Edwin Hantz, organ,
Hill Aud., 8 p.m.
Foreign Visitors
Following person at Foreign Visitor
Division, Rms. 22-24. Mich. Union, 764-
2148: Mr. K. Kitamura, Doshisha
Univ., Kyoto, Japan, Sept. 16-17.
Placement Service
3200 S.A.B.
Further Info., on these programs at
Career Planning, 3200 S.A.B.,- 764-6338
Eastern Mich. Univ., study abroad
summer '71, India, Philippines, Scan-
dinavia, Br. Educ. Study, history-Euro-
pean.
Univ. of State of N.Y., Dept. of Edu-
ration, grad. fellowships in soc. sct.,
ind pub. and international affairs.
Casualty Actuarial Soc., twice yearly
test Nov. 4. ,/apply before Oct. 1.
Univ. of Pittsburgh, Sch. of Bus.
11 mo. prog. leading to MBA, scholar-
ships, loans and assistantships avail.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Angel Fli'ght Mass Meeting, Sept.
22, 7:30 p.m. UGLI Multipurpose Room.
* * * *
Christian Science Organization Meet-
ing. Sept. 17, 7:30 p.m. 3545 SAB.
U of M" Tae Kwon Do Club Karate
iemonstration/1st informational meet-
ing. Tuesday, Sept. 5, 7:00 p.m. Wat-
erman Gym.
* * * *
Gay Liberation Front. Wed., Sept.
16, 8:00 p.m. 117 N. Thayer No. 4. New
members meeting.
University of Michigan Flyers. 7 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 21, 3080 East Engin. The
complete course to pass the FAA writ-
ten exam. For further information con-
tact: Dave Fradin, 764-6665 Mar k
Wagner, 764-1706. -
Tenants Union Mass Meeting, Thurs-
:Iay, Sept. 17, Main 'Floor, SAB, 7:30
p.m. All interested are welcome.

versity is too dependent on exter-
or sources of funds, and there-
fore its policy becomes represent-
ative of the main sources of re-
venue and not, the University
community, Ross added.
"It was a bit too heavy to get
rid of ROTC. That is the name
of the game - there is no neutral-
ity - it gives in to the highest
bidder," he said. Militarists and
capitalists should not dictate Uni-
versity spending and allocation of
resources, Ross continued. Instead,
"people in the University and
community should have a say in
what the first priorities are and
where the money goes."
Opposing Mendel, Ross sighted
the need for radical social change
within the University itself. "The
University has become a shell with
a :chick inside pushing out at the
thin walls because it has become
obsolete," he charged.
Ross also differed with Knauss
on the subject of the University's
neutrality. By remaining neutral,
Ross asserted, the University is
partial to the elite groups within
! society: "The minimum we can
ask of them is to at least get off
the wrong side."
SDStrial
before CSJI
(Continued from Page 1)
The attorney -representing SDS
countered this saying the act of
organizing the demonstrating does
not imply responsibility for the'
disruption that ensued.
The January lock-in was one of
several political actions taken by
SDS last winter. SDS justified its
actions 'by questioning the legal
right of various corporations to
recruit saying "the basic function
'of these corporations is disrup-
tive.",
CSJ chairmen predicted the
trial "would take about a month,"
with at least four sessions spread
over a four week period.,
TV RENTALS.
$10.50 per month
FREE DELIVERY
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

(Continued from Page 1)
Police scrambled behind tele-
phone poles and buildings for
protection while dodging fire from
the house.
The Desire Housing project,
where more than 10,000 blacks
live, is directly across the street
from the-house.
"Get your head back from that
window," a policeman yelled at
one man in the project. The po-
liceman took aim with his sub-
machine gun to back up his order.
Several hundred blacks flooded
from the project after the arrest
of the 14. A long line of blue-
shirted policemen and Louisiana
state troopers stood in the middleI
of the street facing the crowd with!
rifles and shotguns ready.
There were a few brief skirm-
ishes in the quadrangel when some
of the younger blacks jostled po-
lice. Officers used the butts of
their rifles to disband the clusters
and arrested -'foul' others. Hun-
dreds came back to the sidewalks
as police maintained their vigil.
In Birmingham yesterday, three
blacks were wounded as sheriff's
deputies and members of the mili-
tant Alabama Black Liberation
Front traded gunfire yesterday,
Sheriff Mel Bailey said.
The Jefferson County sheriff
said the shooting occurred when
his deputies tried to serve an evic-
tion notice in a predominantly
black section of Birmingham.
He said none of his men was
hurt and five persons were arrest-
UM BARBERS
8:30-5:15 P.M.
UM UNION

I

r -

QUESTION NO. 1

WOULD YOU BUY

A USED

1~

CAR FROM THIS MAN?

QUESTION NO. 2

.1

ed and charged with assault with
intent to murder.
Bailey said the Alabama Black
Liberation Front reportedly is a
splinter group of the Black Pan-
thers.

UNION LANES

WOULD AN
ANN ARBOR M'ERCHANT

PUY
fro

AN

e

._ . "/.'

9 4
0y
You
(maybe)

Find? Your Calling'
Beu+
Za itg Sales man
See Jim 'or Andy
764-0554 or 761-1907
-I

". 0

I,

I

_

. . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .

Jacobson's New Store Hours: Mon., Iues., Wed., Sat. 9:30-5:30; Thurs., Fri. 9:30-9:00
contemporary classics in the Miss J mood.
the long-line coats by Junior Gallery
come up with the free-wheeling look that's
a fashion must for the 70's. Broadly
belted and going to longer lengths,
B
these classically proportioned 'coats
are top-notch, contemporaries
over every length in the
young wardrobe. Sizes 5 to 13.
A. Four-pocket coat in cognac
or green wool melton, $75.
B. Fencer-front coat with
tunneled belt in
i dark vIolet wool, 575.
ti ".C.Herringbone ensemble
of coat, pant and
rib-knit sweater; grey or
"'brown wool/nylon, $100.
The 14" boot with gathered
stretch panel in black
or brown calf, $23.
oor
......... -.-.."' 1 . : «

"' ,
e.

C

,I

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
24 HOUR REFERRAL
and INFORMATION SERVICE
DIAL 76-GUIDE
any question . . . any problem . . . any time
student staff provide immediate help for a wide
range of problems and questions: information about,
and referral to, campus and community resources for
any problem; information on campus and community
events; someone to listen when you need to talk ...
24 hours a day... every day .. .
a service of Student Affairs Counseling Office

10

it

III}

I

I

r

1.
IV

Expect The Unexpected

in The Village Voice

I

Every issue of The Voice uncovers what's new and controversial. The
Voice is the weekly newspaper dedicated to free opinion on just about
everything; from the international scene to local politics; from enter-
tainment land the arts to nuclear physics. It is news and reviews of
politics, books, theatres, movies, music, and art. It's Jack Newfield,
Michael Harrington, Nat Hentoff, Andrew Sarris, Vivian Gornick, Jill
Johnston, and Jules Feiffer.
, Subscribe to The Voice at $5 a year
and get 52 issues of the best.
rl. -Here's m scuerintinn tn The Voice. I nclose $

'I

p

,' *-"'-""""-'-' I I '.-~ -~
I'a'a
I V ~
""""-----"-'--'-".':'-' ~ I I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan