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September 16, 1970 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, September, 16, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page 'Seven

Wednesday, September 16, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

---on this and that
Hard Luck Wile
comes back
_eric siegel
WE WERE ON our way back from an Amoco gas station out
on Plymouth Road that, at least momentarily, was in sole
possession of a well-used, slightly beat-up automnobile belonging
to William Jerome (Billy) Harris.
"That's me. Hard Luck Willie," he said with a touch of
irony and humor but no bitterness.
Hard Luck Willie. The phrase wouldn't even bear re-
peating if Harris' biggest problem in the last few months
was a broken fan belt on a second hand car. But Harris, one
of the Wolverines' split ends, has been plagued by a knee
injured diving for a ball in the end zone with just 32 seconds
showing on the clock on the Rose Bowl scoreboard last
January and Michigan trailing, 10-3.
He underwent surgery two days later, limped around on
crutches for six weekq and missed all of spring practice and part
of the fall drills. That's hard luck.
"I haven't thought about which teams are going to give
me the most problems with pass defense," he said in response to
a question. "The only problem for me is to-overcome this leg
of mine. It'd be nice if I had two good legs, but I think I'll be
all right.'
Judging from his performance during Saturday's scrim-
mage, his thinking seems to be sound. On the second play
of the first series of downs, he caught a look-in pass from
Don Moorhead for 12 yards. Later, he charged between a
pair of defenders and broke up a potential interception on
an errant pass. In all, he caught four passes for 44 yards,
second best on the team.
"The good part about the scrimmage for me wasn't so much
that I caught the passes," Harris said, "but that I got hit and
+. didn't have any trouble with my leg. It was the first time I got
hit and knocked down and had people piling on me in eight
months.
"I didn't know if I'd get back up at first, but I wasn't worried
about it. If I was worried about. it, I couldn't have gone out
there. figured if I hurt my knee again, they'd say, 'Well, he
tried, anyway.'"
There were times, though, when there was more cause
for worry. Although the knee was painful for only about
10 minutes after the game before it went numb, Harris said
he can remember not being able to support his weight on it
in the shower.
"It felt like- someone hit me in the knee, with a hammer
when I went down," Harris said. "I had just taken a course in
1~ training and conditioning, and something inside me said, 'You
just did something to your knee.'"
In the lockerronm, team physician Gerald O'Conner looked
at the knee and said it "looks a litte loose."
"I felt sick," Harris said.
Six weeks later, they took the cast off, and Harris began
strengthening hio knee. He started off with whirlpool treatments,
and then started jumping ropes doing isometrics and running
He was also lifting weights with his legs. When he started he
could do only three sets with ten pounds; by the time he was
finished, he was lifting 60.
"The exercises got to be a grind," he said. "I'd go and ask
the trainer for something new to do, and he'd say to take the
week off." He sometimes took a day off, but only occasionally.
Harris didn't start running patterns until the middle
of August, about a week before the team opened its fall
drills. At first, he couldn't run them very well, or very often.
By his own admission, he was "a little rusty" running the
patterns, and his knee would swell up with a lot of cutting.
Consequently, when the team was practicing twice a day,
Harris could practice only once.
Now, the problem is mainly one of speed. Speed is one of
Harris' main attributes, one that helps hin in his peculiar af-
finity for catching the long ball. Two years ago, he snared 16
passes for 369 yards, including four touchdowns passes in four
consecutive games. Last year, he caught 14 for 290 yards, in-
cluding a 59 yard touchdown pass against Washington and a
34 yard picture play against Purdue with a diving snare of a
ball that was underthrown.
"I'm not as fast-as I once was," Harris said, "but I'm not
as slow as I used to be."
Even the slower Billy Harris is counted upon Jto do a
larger share of the Wolverines' pass-catching this year.
Earlier in the year, Coach' Bo Schembechler said, "Harris
has worked like a dog to get in shape. I hope he's ready.
He can really help us." Earlier this week, Schembechler
was a little more positive. "He'll play some," he said, "He'll
get in there."
"If you want a good story," sports information director
Will Perry told me late last month, "talk to Billy Harris. He's
a helluva guy and he's done a tremendous job getting back in

shape to play."
It is, of course, Perry's job to publicize prominent Michigan
athletes. But Harris is no All-America candidate. In fact, he's
not even listed on Michigan's starting line-up. He's just a hard
luck guy who has come back strong.

Syracuse coach

denies racism

Gridders 8th in poll;
Stanford ranked 4th

EDITOR'S NOTE: With the boil-
ing oven of the civil rights move-
ment and student protests into
Syracuse's athletic department, Ben
Schwartzwalder has found himself
in the unwanted position of acting
as spokesman tor many of his fellow
football coaches.
Schwartzwalder agreed to an ex-
clusive interview with the Asso-
ciated Press to discuss his action of
suspending eight black players from
his squad.
By The Associated Press
Q-Is there any way the
eight black players could get
back on the football team this
year?
A-They had a chance to sign
a statement that was given to
them by the chancellor. They
didn't sign it. I would think that
if they had been serious about
playing they would have signed it.
Q-The black players said
that the spring boycott was de-
signed to expose the issue of
racism that exists on the team.
What is your reaction to such a
charge?
A-We never were' conscious of
racism. When a group of players
miss 16 days of practice, then
don't want to come back except on
their terms, members of the squad
feel that they shouldn't be on the
squad, and it wouldn't matter if
they are black or white.
We didn't have a black coach.
The idea that we promised them
a black coach last springdis not
true. We hired a black coach this
August. The chancellor agreed to
do this obviously because they
made so much of it. We brought
in a fine young man, Carlman
Jones, and he seems to be having
his difficulties now with the same
group.
Q-Jim Brown was the only
Negro on the team when he was
here. He felt some of the assist-
ant c o a c h e s discriminated
against him. However he praised
you for your fairness. Iow do
you feel?

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
RICK CORNFELD
A-In my opinion, there isn't
any of the eight young men in
Mr. Brown's class as an athlete.
He worked. These young men for
the last few years haven't bother-
ed to come down in the winter
very much and work out, and the
other members of the team feel
that they really don't want to play
football.
Q-Protests andsdemonstra-
tions on the campus have been
with us for several years. Have
you talked these situations over
with other football coaches?
A-Yes, we discussed this at the
recent NCAA meeting. It seems
as though any place, any school
where a third party entered the
situation you had_ groupism. A
group of athletes went to a third
party and discussed their problems
with them, instead of discussing
them with the football coach. This
is where you later had serious
problems. I would say that this
was the situation at Syracuse. We
were no longer dealing with ath-
letes.
Q-Have you made any
changes from the way you
treated Negro players in the
past?,
A-Well, I always felt that the
Negro needed a little special con-
sideration. Most of these young
men we have had have a tough
financial background. Our policy
over the years is that we try to
be more gentle with these boys be-

-i By The Associated Press
Stanford, a 34-28 winner over
Arkansas last weekend, and Mis-
souri, a 3-0 victor over Baylor,
produced the only major shake-
ups in the first weekly college
football poll of The Associated
Press.
Arkansas' Razorbacks, rated No.
4 in preseason rankings, w e r e
bumped to No. 11. Stanford, pre-
. viously ranked 10th, took over the
fourth spot and Missouri moved
up one notch to No. 11 in the poll
of football writers and broad-
casters.
Ohio State, defending national
champion Texas, and Southern
California remained one-two-
three. OSU and Texas were idle
last weekend while Southern Cal-
defeated Alabama 42-21.
Twenty-four 'of the 40 voters
picked Ohio State No. 1, giving
the Buckeyes 728 points. Texas
had six first-place votes for 657
-Associated Press points while the Trojans accumu-

lated only 644 points, including
seven No. 1 votes.
Mississippi, ranked No. 5; Penn
State, No. 7 and Michigan, No-
8, each received one first-place
vote.
1. Ohio State (24) 0-0 728
2. Texas (6) 0-0 657
3. Southern California (7) 1-0 637
4. Stanford , -0 481
5. Mississippi (1) 0-0 432
6. Notre Dame 010 364
7. Penn State 0-0 316
8. Michigan (1) 0-0 307
9. Nebraska 1-0 29
10. Missouri 1-0 260
11. Arkansas 0-1 148
12. Louisiana State 0-0 139
13. Kansas State 1-0 134
14. Florida 1 -0 94
15. Houston 0-0 91
16. UCLA 1-0 70
17. West Virginia 1-0 44
18. Oklahoma , . 1-0 40
19. Georgia. . 0-0 21
20. Arlzano State 0-0 16
Others receiving votes, listed alpha-
betically: Air Force, Alabama, Auburn,
California, Colorado, Georgia Tech,
Kansas, Navy, North Carolina, Oregon,
Purdue, South Carolina, Tennessee,
Toledo, Utah.

WILLIE MAYS of the San
Francisco Giants scores from
third on a pass ball by Atlanta
Braves catcher Bob Tillman
-Monday night. Pitcher Mike
McQueen covers home plate.
This was the first run of San
Francisco's 7-5 victory.
cause they are more sensitive. We!
hope that we continue to have
them, and we look forward, God
willing, to surviving this thing.
Q-Do you have any special
riles concerning c 1 o t hi n g,
length of hair, beards?
A-We have no written rules,
or unwritten rules. I know legally
that I can have no rules about
haircuts, so I don't have any rules.
But, come out to practice, and
fortunately, you won't see any
beards.

95% OF THE READING POPULATION READS ONLY 250 TO 300 WORDS PER MINUTE OR LESS
FAST READING IS NOT DIFFICULT TO LEARN!I

All those who completed 'courses held this
past year at the Bell Tower Hotel achieved
speeds of 800 to 1800 w.p.m. with the same
or increased comprehension they had at their
slower reading rates.
SEE HOW EASILY YOU CAN:
-save hours, use your time more efficiently
-learn to read 3 to 10 times faster than
you do now
-improve your comprehension and increase your
enjoyment of reading material
at a cost less than HALF that of nearly all
other commercial reading courses!

l
y
e' c b
'
e
,,
, - t
. _ --

Mlajor League Standings .

Bring a book to a free, live demonstration of the reading skills which will be taught in a GUARANTEED
course offered this semester.
Demonstrations Tues., Wed., Thurs., Sept. 15, 16, 17-7:30 P.M.
at the Bell Tower Hotel, 300 So. Thayer St., across from Burton Tower

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East

Baltimore
New York
Detroit
Boston
Cleveland
Washington
Minnesota
Oakland
California
Kansas City
Milwaukee
Chicago

Wl
96
83
75
75
72
68 1
West
88
81
78
58
56 !
53 1

L
51
65
72
73
76
78
59
68
69
88
91
93

Pct.
.653
.561
.510
.507
.486
.466
.599
.544
.531
.397
.361
.363

GB
13Y2
21
21%1
241/
27 i/2
8
10
291/
32
34/

Atlanta at San Francisco, inc.
Houston 9, Cincinnati 2
San Diego at Los Angeles, inc.
Today's Games
New York at Montreal
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia,
St. Louis at Chicago
Cincinnati at Houston
San Diego at Los Angeles
Atlanta at San Francisco

TV RENTALS
$10.50 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

I

..

I

Yesterday's Results
Baltimore 6, Washington 2
New York 8, 3, Boston 6, 2
Cleveland 4, Detroit 3
Minnesota 7,3, California 5, 5
Chicago at Kansas City, ppd.
Milwaukee 1, 5, Oakland 0, 6
Today's Games
Detroit at Cleveland
Oakland at Milwaukee
Chicago at Kansas City
California at Minnesota
Baltimore at Washington
Boston at New York
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East
W L Pct. GB
Pittsburgh 78 68 .534 -
Chicago 77 69 .527 1
New York 78 70 .527 1
St. Louis 70 78 .473 9
Philadelphia 66 82 .446 13
Montreal 65 82 .442 13%
West
Cincinnati 93 57 .620 -
Los Angeles 79 67 .541 12
San Francisco 78 69 .531 13%
Atlanta 72 77 .483 20%
-Houston 71 76 .483 20
San Diego 58 90 .392 34
Yesterday's Results
Montreal 5, New York 4, 10 inn.
Pittsburgh 8, Philadelphia 3
Chicago. 5, St. Louis 3

Synchronized Swimming
MASS MEETING
Wednesday, Sept. 16

APPLICATIONS, NOW BEIGTAKEN
FOR
Two Student Government Council vacancies
(MEMBER-AT-LARGE SEATS)
All five student positions on the Office
of Student Services Policy Board
Two Vacancies on the Bookstore Policy Board
('U' STORE BOARD OF DIRECTORS)
Fill Out Applications and SIGN UP FOR
INTERVIEWS at 13546 Student Activities Bldg.
Students from all schools and colleges, graduates and undergraduates are
urged to apply.

7 p.m. - Women's Pool

l

Be ready to swim

Our Newswriers
are Newsmakers

MOVE

D

THE DETROIT PRESS CLUB FOUNDATION 1910
statewide college journalism competltion ..

Billoar
s. AW'4lWW.V.llVfA..WA.., . .

Fall hockey starts Oct. 1. The
first 14 teams that enter and
pay the $50 fee will be accepted
into the league.
Touch football officials are
needed desperately for the com-
ing season. Anyone interested
should see Dirk Pitcher at the
IM office.

TV RENTALS
$10.50 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEAC TV RENTALS
662-5671
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

SINCE REGISTRATION?
REPORT CHANGE OF ADDRESS
at WINDOW A, LS&A BLDG.

JUDY SARASOHN, The Michigan Daily

1st PRIZE for news reporting
GRAND PRIZE for overall excellence

n

THE HARPER'S MAGAZINE 1910 nationwide
college criticism competition ..

by Sept. 18, 1970

for THE '70-'71 STUDENT DIRECTORY

1 st PRIZE for Political Criticism

RON LANDSMAN, The Michigan Daily

DOWNTOWN
HONDA

I

i

TEACHING FELLOWS

{

UNION

HONORABLE MENTION for Art Criticism
R. A. PERRY, The Michigan Daily
THE SCHOLASTIC CREATIVE STORY AWARDS,
United States and Canada college
writing competition ..
7 ,iul f 2 ,. q nwr.c. nri L n l.'meI'

Organizational Meeting
" GRIEVANCE COMMITTEE

:i ARM., Awl Ao. Anam w

I I _ ErAes P r~

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