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September 10, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, September 10, 7 97 0

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Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, September 10, 1970.

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Solstis vs.
U'in lease
dispute-
(Continued from Page 1)
versity does not have to comply
with.
After paying rent to the Uni-
versity, they also assert that if the
house is indeed "substandard"
then the University had the obli-
gation to correct it or else not to
rent it.
"Besides, if it was structurally
deficient, why did they Install' a
new furnace last year?," says one
staff member.
For now,rthe University has
agreed to let an Ann Arbor city
housing official inspect the house.
This inspection could yield an es-
timate of repairs necessary by city
code if Solstis is incorporated.
Such an estimate could be com-
pared with the University's figure
of $8,491. The University believed
tlis amount was necessary to re-
pair the house by University
standards. No matter what the"
cost, for repairs is, Solstis mem-
bers are still undecided what
course to take.
In the last few days public sup-
Correction
In yesterday's issue of The
Daily, a story on Sunday's
bomb seare at Alice Lloyd Hall
reported that t he fire alarm
system-was defective and did
not ring on all the floors. How-
ever,, due to unclear operating
procedures the alarm was in-
correctly set.
port for Solstis has grown. Over
4,000 people have signed petitions
turned into the Housing Office in
support of Solstis' position. Stu-
dent Government Council, Ten-
ants Union, Pilot Program and
some professors have issued state-
ments in support of Solstis.
Despite this support, it remains
unlikely that the University will
make any further concessions.
Sostis memberstsay the, adminis-
tration feels it has been already
more than generous in permitting
Sostis to use the house for the
summer
TV RENTALS,
$10.50 per month
NO DEPOSIT
S LIVERY
ADSRVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

113 British captured
in another hijacking

(Continued from Page 1)
Commando hijackers command-j
eered the British Overseas Airways'
Corp VC10 over the Persian Gulf1
and directed it to a guerrilla-held
airstrip in Jordan, where the two
other planes and their nearly 200l
occupants have sat fwr three days
under "the desert sun.
The Internatiohal Committee of
the Red Cross said early today the
guerrillas agreed to postpone their
deadline for blowing up the two
jetliners-a Swissair DC8 and a
Trans World Airlines Boeing 707
-at least until Red Cross repre-
sentative Andre Rochat could meet,
with them later in the day. ,
The United States has sent six
big Air Force transports, with
medical teams, to the crisis-ridden
Middle East. And the Nixon ad-
ministration is keeping the door
open for mother contingency moves
involving military resources.

Assignment of the C130 trans-
ports to an allied base at Incirlik,
Turkey, was announced( yesterday
by the, White House. It was de-
scribed as a precautionary smove
in the event that the hundreds of
hijack victims .of Arab guerrillas
in Jordan soon can be removed
from the area.
A State Department spokesman
said if this situation arose the
United States would bring out not
only Americans but all other avail-
able hostages.
At the White House President
Nixon's Press Secretary, Ronald'
L. Ziegler, refused to answer ques-
tions about whether the United
States has moved or plans to move
other .military units or equipment
into position closer to the Jor-
danian desert air strip where the
hostages are held in hijacked
planes. Incirlikisabout 350 miles
to the North. t

Daily Official Bulletin
(Continued from Page 6)
land - Lynda Copeland, harpsichord:
School of Music Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
General Notices
Michigan Memorial - Phoenix Pro-
ject invites Univ. faculty to submit re-
quests for grants to support research
in peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Re-
turn applications to Phoenix Project
by Sept. 25; obtain applications at the
Phoenix Memorial Lab. N. Campus, or
call 764-6213.
Elizabeth S. Lee Medical History
Prize awarded to jr. or sr. premed stu
dents in College of LS&A for best es-
say on history; of medicine; medical
school freshmen also eligible if on joint
program in LS&A; prizes of $500.00 &
$200.00; info at 1220 Angell Hall; dead-
line Dec. 1.
Placement Service
National Security Agency Professional
Qualification Test, register for exami-
nation before Sept. 30, test on Oct.
10. Applications at Career Planning,
3200 SAB.
Further information on these pro-
grams at 3200 SAB.
SUSIA Foreign Affairs Intern Pro-
gram, leading to MA, George Wash.
Univ., special Ford Foundation grant
program for members of minority
groups, on-the-job training, stipend.
Mott Foundation Fellowships in Com-
munity Educ., MA and PhD programs
for applicants with demonstrated lead-
ership abilities and interest in com-
munity educ. Teaching exper. or lead-
ership in community nec.
Western Washington State College
program for preparing inter-city com-
munity college teachers in areaof
communications, BA in Engl, exper. in
speech therapy or remedial reading req.
Min. 3 yrs, teaching exper., 2 year pro-
gram.
:1.

Senior Pictures
Sign-Ups
TUES. to FRI.
10 A.M.-4 P.M.

...,...{r:..r ,.................. .,...,'.......: ........ ....... :".. r;:....,:{..: r::::5-:':4 ::"".:: i " ?r'....Vv" . v':{

:;
;;
#:
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,

DRUG HELP
24 HR. CRISIS PHONE-761 HELP
BUMMERS, DRUG INFO., REFERRALS
24 HR. WALK-IN HELP AT
NEW LOCATION-900 LINCOLN

Diag Michiganensian Booth
YEARBOOK ORDERS-SAME TIME-$7.00

,
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DOWN TOWN
HONDA

ELECTIONS 7)
PROF. JACK WALKER, Instructor
Course in contemporary political issues which will
include work in the 1970 election campaigns, lec-
tures by University and non-university authorities
and discussion groups.
T-Th. 3.4 Poli. Sci. 300
Nat. Sci. Aud. Div. No. 450
Plus Discussion 4 credit hrs.

Prof. Lansin dies

I

John B. Lansing, chairman of
the economics department at the
University, died Tuesday at Uni-
versity Hospital.
Lansing was admitted to the
hospital Aug. 29 for' brain sur-
gery less than two months after
he succeeded Harvey E. Brazer as
department chairman.,Bs
Lansing, who had been a mem-
ber of the University faculty for
21 years,; has been involved in
the publication of several books
and is nationally and interna-
tionally known for his research in
urban - planning, transportation
and consumer motivation.
He was, at the time of his
death, chairman of the. Study
Conference on Environmental Re-
search of the National Science
Foundation.
Lansing travelled extensively as
a part of his comparative research
projects. He visited universities in
Australia and Europe to do work
in urban studies.
He had just completed co-
authorship ofa textbook on the
3-

methadology of e c o n o m i c re-
search.
Lansing was born in Geneva,
N.Y., on July 11, 1919. He mar-
ried Marjorie Tillis in 1945. She
survives, as do two sons, Stephen
and Philip, and a daughter, Carol.
Memorial services will be held
at 2 p.m. Saturday at St. Andrew's
'Episcopal Church.
A memorial fund to finance
graduate study in the fields of
Prof. Lansing's interest has been
established through the Univer-
sity's Economics department.
Contributions should be sent to
the department.

Sections

no prerequisites

Conspiring!

Order Your Daily Now-
one 764-0558

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3,10 E. Washington

Ann Arbor

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ENDING
TONIGHT

603ton . oIBErYt OO ix
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SHOWS AT:
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FALL SEASONS:

WOMEN'S TENNIS CLUB SPONSORS ALL-CAMPUS
WOMEN'S TENNIS TOURNAMENT-Sept. 12 and 13

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Hairstyling
To Please

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Entry Deadline Sept. 11, 5:00 P.M., Waterman Gym Office 4

NOW 4 SHOPS
0 ARBORLAND
* MAPLE VILLAGE
* ,1 BERTY OFF STATE
* EAST UNIV. AT SO. UNIV.
THE DASCOLA BARBERS

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FIRST MEETING: Sept. 9, 4:00 P.M.-Palmer Field
Weekly Practice Mons., Weds., Thurs. 4:00-6:00 P.M.

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AT

YOUR

SERVICE

1

University Housing feels that all students should be free to concentrate on aca-
demic (and other) pursuits without added worry of dietary requirements.
Therefore, University Housing offers an "Optional Meal Contract" for any Uni-

versity student.

available at Couzens Hall, Alice Lloyd Hall, South Quad, East Quad, or West Quad

select one convenient location

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initiate or cancel contract at your request

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select breakfast, lunch, or dinner, or any combination, on a weekly basis
* modest price (for example, three meals a day for an academic year contract would cost
$2.77 a day)
CATCH 22-not really, but we should mention that there are specified dining hours ateach residence, there are a limited number of contracts available,
and you do have to pay, not much, but some.

IF

COUZENS-764-2130
ALICE LLOYD-764-1181

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