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September 10, 1970 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-10

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Thursday, September ,1 {},.1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page, Seven

~Fhursday, September 10, 1 9 7 0 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

on this and that
Athletic financing,
continued
eric siegel
TALKING ABOUT a surplus in funds before that surplus
occurs is almost as bad as talking about the tenth game of
the season before the first nine games are played.
Almost, but not quite.
Michigan athletic director Don Canham is not yet
ready to concede that there will be any surplus in funds
this year. "Our= revenue will be increasing this year," he
says, "but our costs are rising, too." On the other hand,
he's not ready to deny the potential.
Canham cited increases in plane fares, hotel rooms, salaries
and tuition as items that could eat into an estimated revenue
increase of more than $300,600.
All of these increases are, to be sure, very real. They have
been documented on these pages before Canham mentioned
them to me in a telephone interview yesterday. They are the
reason why almost every college athletic department in the
country is worried about its financies; why three Big Ten
schools had a deficit last year; and why Wisconsin has begun
cutting back on its spring sports program.
They are also the reason why the Big Ten is looking
into the possibility of licensing and merchandizing novelties
bearing the names of its member schools, and why a school
like Michigan has to engage in Madison Avenue style pro-
motion campaigns .to stay alive. But more on that will
' come later.
Canham is, of course, understandably cautious when talk-
ing about the possibility of a surplus 'in athletic funds, and he
has history on his side. As he noted yesterday, there has not
been a surplus in athletic funds in the last seven years.
But neither has there been an increase in football attend-
ance approaching the projected 100,000 increase for home and
*4 away games for the coming season. In fact, the biggest regular-
season increase in that seven-year period was the 60-odd
thousand increase in 1965 as compared to the '64 season.
Nor, it should be pointed out, was there a possibility of
increasing basketball attendance significantly, nor a high-
level promotion campaign directed at doing the same.
By 1971, when Micligan begins playing an 11 game foot-
ball schedule, with seven of those games at.home, revenue should
again show a significant gain. And that revenue should help
keep Michigan in the black at least for a couple of years.
The purists who remember college football the way it was
"back then" will undoubtedly rise in protest against these new
revenue-raising techniques, whether they be promotion and
advertising or licensing and merchandizing, whether they con-
tribute to a surplus or merely help reduce a deficit.
But the purists do not constitute an immediate threat
to college sports, although they may have the philosophical
edge in the long run. The threat to college sports comes
from using costs; if nothing else, these new techniques will
give college sports a breather and perhaps a chance to
consider some more technical and philosophical questions,
such as the effect of pro football on colleges, and the role
of athletics, varsity and non-varsity, in the university.
The possibility (or likelihood) of a surplus in athletic funds
here-despite doubts, questions and qualifications that may or
may not need to be raised-is an intriguing one. It could, for
the first time, give Canham the funds he needs to improve the
facilities for intramural and club sports on this campus that
he feels are important to the total athletic environment.
Last week, noting that he was "encouraged" by the ii-
creased student-faculty interest in varsity 'as well as IM
athletics, Canham said, "I couldn't justify our activity if I didn't
believe i ', had something good going for the University."
The beauty of the Madison Avenue style approach to
athletic financing is that, as things stand now, it is prob-
ably the one thing that offers the likelihood (possibility?)
of producing a surplus, and of possibly making a good
thing better.

Kuhn

reinstates

McLarn

suspension

NEW YORK (P)-Pitcher Denny
McLain of Detroit was in more
hot water yesterday when Baseball
Commissioner Bowie Kuhn sus-
pended him again, this time at
least for the rest of the 1970 sea-
son.
Kuhn said McLain's latest pen-
alty-his third suspension this
year-did not stem either from
involvement with gamblers, which
kept him on the sidelines until
July 1, or from his Aug. 28 dousing
of two Detroit sportswriters with
ice water, for which the Tigers
slapped him with a one-week sus-
pension.'
All Kuhn would say was that
"certain new allegations have
been brought to my attention, in-
cluding allegations regarding Mc-
Lain's conduct with respect to the
Detroit management and informa
tion that on occasions Mcbain has
carried a gun."
After 31/2 hours of meetings
with McLain, his lawyer and of-
ficials of the Detroit ball club
and baseball, Kuhn anounced the
new suspension, which he said
was "pending further proceedings,
which by 'agreement of counsel
will not take place' befort the end
of the season."~
Actually, although his original
suspension expired July 1, McLain
has been on probation since and

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
JIM K9EVRA
was required to provide the com-
missioner's office with such in-
formation on his financial affairs.,
Financial difficulties led him into
the involvement with bookmakers
that caused his first suspension.
Kuhn and McLain's lawyer, Wil-
liam Aikens, read statements but
refused to answer any questions.
McLain slipped out of the building
by a rear entrance.
Kuhn's statement read:
"I have granted the request of
counsel for Denny McLain for
an adjournment of today's hear-
ing which was scheduled to de-
termine whether McLain's re-
cent conduct was consistent
with his probationary status.
'I have reinstated McLain's
suspension pending further pro-
ceedings, which by agreement
of counsel will not take place
before the end of the season.
"The present suspension of

McLain was not brought about
by his recent suspension by the
Detroit club or by any conduct
of the type which led to his ear-
lier suspension by me on March
31. Certain new allegations have
been brought to my attention,
including allegations regarding
McLain's conduct with respect
to the Detroit management and
information that on occasions
McLain has carried a gun."
"As counsel for Mr. McLain,"
Aikens said in statement, "I have
instructed Mr. McLain that while
the present proceedings are pend-
ing he is to refrain from discussing
the matters involved and he will
have no further comment on these
matters at this time.''
McLain, 26-year old right-
hander has fallen on hard times
after winning 31 games in 1968

and 24 last season. He won the
Cy Young Award in 1968 as, the
outstanding pitcher In the Amer-
ican League and shared it last
year with Baltimore's Mike Cuel-
lar.
This season, however, he found
it difficult to regain his previous
form after missing all of spring
training and almost three months
of the season. He has .a 3-5 won-
lost record and 4.73 earned run
average.
Present at yesterday's hearings
in addition to McLain, Kuhn and
Aikens were Paul Porter, base-
ball's attorney; Charles Segar,
secretary-treasurer of baseball;
Henry Fitzgibbon, In charge of
security for the sport.

f

'U

ART PRINT LOAN

Liven up your room-rent a
Loan for a semester or a year.

print from Art

Print

-Associated Press
DENNY McLAIN leaves a New York hotel after his meeting with
baseball Commissioner Bowie Kuhn. After the meeting it was
revealed that McLain had been suspended for the third time this
year-this time, for the remainder of the season.

3524, 3529 SA B
Wednesday 3-5, 7-9
Thursday 3-5, 7-9
Friday 3-5
Saturday 10-12

BO STILL NOT SATISFIED
Gridders hold second scrimmage

By MORT NOVECK
Michigan's football squad heldl
its second scrimmage in the sta-
dium yesterday and as could be
expected, the first string out-
scored the second by a 28-14 mar-
gin. As also could be expected,
head coach Bo Schembechler still
isn't satisfied.
"We still have offensive prob-
lems," he stated. "The offense
is still rusty." Even though he
was displeased with the offense's
lack of polish, Schembechler was,
injured offensive backs w e r e
however, pleased that most of his
healthy enough to participate.
BILLY TAYLOR, who has been
hampered by injuries since the
Rose Bowl, started at fullback for
the first string and scored two
touchdowns. "Taylor is still rusty,"
Schembechler commented, "but at
times he looked like his old self."
Tailback Lance Scheffler, out!
with a pulled thigh muscle, re-
turhed and drew. praise for his
perforniance, "We were real glad
to have Scheffler and Taylor back
today," Schembechler added.
Sophomore w i n g b a c k Randy
Logan, was another returnee.
Schembechler is not displeased

with his progress, but cautions,
"He is behind because h has miss-
ed so much practice."
BECAUSE OF this, Logan is
currently lining up with the second
string but Schembechler isn't
sure as yet who his wingback will
be in the opening game. Bill Berut-
ti has played well with the start-
ing backfield but the statements
"If the first game was tomorrow
I'd have to say that Berutti is our
starting wingback," is as far as
Schembechler will go towards
committing himself.
Tom Darden also participated in
his first scrimmage 'yesterday and
distinguished himself with a fine
runback of a punt as well as his

defensive backfield play. In fact,t
if a holding penalty hadn't inter-f
fered, the defensive backfields
could have tied the second string.t
Bruce Elliot, wide side defensive
halfback, made a good intercep-
tion of a Jack McBride pass andt
found himself in the end zoneI
after a bit broken field running.
Unfortunately, the play was called
back on a disputed holding pen-
alty, to be resolved later in the
film room, nullifying the score.
HAPPILY, casualties were at a
minimum in- the practice. Taylor
injured his hand in a pile up, but
only missed a few plays. Defensive
tackle Tom Beckman was the ma-
jor loser, as he wound up under
Pickings.

too many of his yellow teammates
and sustained a blow to the head
which caused him to be slow get-
ting up.
Practice continues today and
Friday with afternoon drills and
then the final preseason scrim-
mage on Saturday, which will be
closed to the public.

IXI
I
I

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F

Gridde

... .

PIRATES DUMPED:
Metssalvage, split with Phls

All right ydu Daily Sports readers. Once again you have managed
to come through in nothing less than stupendous form. As of now,
entries for this week's Gridde Pickings total ZERO. That's right-a
big fat nothing.
Where are all you Monday Morning Quarterbacks? Where are all
the armchair generals who asked, nay demanded, that we continue
to print this absurd inanity? Have you all given up so easily? Forget
about last year. Let by-gones be by-gones. We have (or rather we
have to for vanity's sake). All is forgiven.
Let's give it one more try-for ffats strops' sake. The worst that
could possibly happen is that you might win a Cottage Inn Pizza.
But nobody said you have to eat it.
Just think-if we only get one entry, and it happens to be your's,
you're the automatic winner. And that's something to write home
about.
Just get your entries in to the Daily office (420 Maynard St.) by
midnight Friday-and don't forget to pick a score for the Arkansas-
Stanford game.

I

I IDAj

MmUSKET..
The all campus musical theptre company NEEDS YOU!
APPLY FOR A CENTRAL: COMMITTEE POSITION!

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
COSTUMER (2 people)
PROPS
MAKE-UP, hair
LIGHT DESIGNER
LIGHT and SOUND.
TECHNICIAN

SET DESIGNER -
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(buildinq, etc.)
STAGE MANAGER
PUBLICITY (4 people)
ARTIST
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DISTRIBUTION

COMMUNICATION
TICKETS and USHERS (2Y
TREASURER
ASSISTANT CHAIRMAN
SECRETARIES (4)
PROGRAM (2)
DESIGN ADS

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Ray Sadecki
fired a four-hitter and D u f f y
Dyer's bases-loded single drove
in the tie-breaking runs as the
*New York Mets whipped Philadel-
phia 3-1 to salvage a split of their
twi-light doubleheader yesterday.
The Phillies took the opener
3-2, ending a four-game Met win-
ning streak.
Barry Lersch pitched a 'six-
hitter and Willie Montanez's
pinch single in the ninth drove
in Philadelphia's winning run in
the opener.
In the second game, Sadecki, 8-
4, struck out 12 and was locked
in a 1-1 duel with Grant Jack-
son until the sixth.
Cleon Jones and Donn Clende-
*non then lined consecutive singles-
over the pitcher's mound. Ken
Singleton sacrificed and Joe Foy
was intentionally walked, bringing

up Dyer, who drilled a single to
left, scoring Jones and Clenden-
on to break the tie.
* * *
Cubs clubbed
CHICAGO - Bobby Wine's
run-scoring single with two out
in the ninth inning snapped a
tie and gave the Montreal Expos
a 3-2 victory over the pennant-
contending Chicago Cubs yester-
day.
John Bateman started the win-
hing rally with a leadoff walk off
relief pitcher Roberto Rodriguez
and Adolfo Phillips ran for him.
Phillips stole second and contin-
ued to third on catcher Randy
Hundley's throwing error.
Rodriguez struck out John Boc-
cabella and retired pinch hitter
Boots Day on a fly to short center
before Wine came through with
his third hit of the, game.

Tigers tripped
DETROIT - Mike Nagy hurled
a four-hitter, tripled, singled and
scored -twice last night as the
Boston Red Sox topped Detroit 4-1
to pull into a third-place tie with
the Tigers in the American League
East.
Tony Conigliaro drove in two
Boston runs, one on his 30th ho-
mer in the fourth inning.
Mike Andrews' single after
Nagy's triple in the fifth provid-
ed the third run and Nagy, 5-3,
scored again in the seventh on a
single, ground out, and single by
Carl Yastrzemski.
Cesar Gutierrez knocked in the
Tiger run in the second with a
sacrifice fly.
Pirates zonked
PITTSBURGH - Pinch-hitter
Carl Taylor cracked a run-scoring
double, triggering a three-run
sixth inning burst, and the St.
Louis Cardinals went on, to stop
Pittsburgh 6-4 last night, drop-
ping the Pirates into a first-place
tie with New York in the National
League East.
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1. Stanford at Arkansas
(pick score)
2. USC at Alabama
3. Holy Cross at Army
4. California at Oregon
5. Colgate at Navy
6. Colorado State at
New Mexico State
7. Duke at Florida
8. South Carolina at
Georgia Tech
9. Washington State at Kansas
10. Kentucky at North Carolina
11. Utah State at Kansas State
12. Oklahoma State at
Mississippi State
13. Villanova at Maryland
14. Wake Forest at Nebraska
15. Oklahoma at
WILD, LOUD, NOISY, I
r~t> that "4
Lawye
C1de F
T h eSept. 10
9-12 P.M.

Southern Methodist
16. UCLA at Oregon State
17. North Carolina State at
Richmond
18. Pacific at Texas at El Paso
19. Virginia at Virginia Tech
0. Oshkosh at Weber State

"MY .FAIR LADY" Musket '71
PETITIONS AVAILABLE NOW - Musket Office, 2nd floor, Michigan Union

I

Mlajor League Standings

Baltimo
New Yo
Detroit
Boston
Clevela
Washin
Minnes
Oakland
Californ
Kansas
Milwau'
Chicago

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East
EW L Pct.
ire 91 51 .641
irk 81 61 .570
74 68 .521
74 68 .521
nd 67 76 .469
gton 66 75 .468
West
ata 74 56 .600
d 78 63 .553
nia 76 65 .539
City 54 86 .386
kee 53 87 .379
50 92 .352

GB
10
17
17
24%/
24Y2
6%
30
31
35

New York
Pittsburgh
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Montreal

East
W
75
75 E
74
68
66
61
West

L
67
67
68
75
77
80

Pct.
.528
.528
.521
.476
.462
.433

G

NATIONAL LEAGUE

GB
1
71/
92
13Y2
12
16
191/
22
37

Yesterday's Results
Boston 4, Detroit 1
Baltimore 1, New York 0
~ Washington 5, Cleveland 4
Chicago 11, Palfornia 4, 1st ;
2nd game, inc.
Minnesota 3, Oakland 1, Ist;
2nd game postponed
Milwaukee at Kansas City, postponed
Today's Games
Milwaukee at Kansas City
Oakland at Minnesota
Boston at Detroit
Washington at Cleveland
New York at Baltimore
Only games scheduled

Cincinnati 91 53 .632-
Los Angeles 77 63 .5501
San Francisco 74 68 .521 l
Atlanta 71 72 .497 1
Houston 68 74 .479
San Diego 53 89 .372?
Yesterday's Results
Montreal 3, Chicago 2
Philadelphia 3, New York 2, 1st
New York 3, Philadelphia 1, 2nd
St. Louis' 6, Pittsburgh 4
Atlanta 6, San Diego 3, 11 inn.;
2nd game inc.
Cincinnati at Los Angeles, inc.
San Francisco 9, Houston 5
Today's Games
Philadelphia at New York
Montreal at Chicago
St. Louis at Pittsburgh
Cincinnati at Los Angeles
Atlanta at San Diego
Houston at San Francisco

..

Mr. I~i~i~Submarines

I

E ~r% 1-k II~ EY3 I tII1I I

mm izrKikic'TU nivc I I

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