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September 09, 1970 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-09

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Wednesday,. September 9, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Surplus

seen

In

athletic

funds

Licensing, inerchandizing
4 ehnqe may be used
By ERIC SIEGEL
The Michigan athletic department has embarked on a
large-scale revenue-raising campaign that is likely to produce
a surplus of more than $200,000 during the current fiscal year.
The campaign, which includes a substantial increase in
a advertising, the booking of a professional basketball exhibi-
tion at Crisler Arena, and the sale of Michigan football pub-
lications, may be expanded as early as next year to include
licensing and merchandizing techniques.
These techniques would involve placing copyrights on
items such as Michigan pennants, dolls, footballs and other
novelties and selling the rights
to manufacturers and distri-
butors. They could produce an *
unforetold amount of funds in
the next several years.

Doughty, two
others return
to action today
By JIM EPSTEIN$
Half of the football squad's
walking wounded came back to
practice yesterday after taking
time off for injuries. Glenn
Doughty, Tom Darden and Lance
Scheffler will all be in uniform for
today's situation scrimmage.
Doughty, first string tailback
and last year's second leading
ground gainer, hadkbeen sidelined
with a strained knee. Doughty
originally injured the knee in last
year's Rose Bowl game.
Darden returns after missing
last week's practice due to a
shoulder separation. The 1969
Wolfman has been moved to de-
fensive back for the 1970 season.
Scheffler, Doughty's b a c k u p
man at tailback, has recovered!
from a bruised thigh which
knocked him out of last Satur-
day's practice.
Still out of action are sopho-
more linebacker Bob Swan, with
a strained knee; defensive backa
Jerry Dutcher, who has a bruised
blood vessel in his arm; and wing-
back Greg Harrison, with a bruisedj
ankle.
A casualty of a different sort
was ex-Wolverine defensive end
Cecil Pryor. Pryor, who made the
Big Ten second team on defense,
was cut for the second time in the
last week. Pryor, the fifth round
draft pick of the Green Bay Pack-
ers, was dropped by the Pack last
week, picked up by the Philadel-
phia Eagles, and given the ax
again yesterday.

All things come and go but, alas, Gridde Picks is not one of them.:
Year after year someone makes the suggestion that we abolish this ego
mechanism and year after year, some anemic senior editor demands
that it stay in.
Having little else to do, this year's anemic has decided to start
Gridde Pickings a week earlier than normal, thus giving one and all
the dubious honor of choosing between Oshkosh and Weber State.
Nevertheless, as thousands, nay millions of you have done in the
past, you will neatly clip out this box, circle the team you'expect to
win, (adding the score in the case of the Stanford-Arkansas game
in case of ties) and grudgingly have your picks into the Daily, at 420
Maynard, by midnight Friday, (12:01 a.m. Saturday morning will be
accepted only if you are willing to buy us a beer.)
As usual, the fearless forecaster who winds up with the best per-
centage will win for himself one gloriously prepared Cottage Inn pizza.
(As usual, the loser will not win anything for himself except his
own gloriously prepared alibi.)
As the week wears on and on and on, various guest selectors will
make their bid for immortality. Football Coach Bo Schembechler, will
be one of them with a couple of biggie surprises popping up every then
and now.
1. Stanford at Arkansas 11. Utah State at Kansas State
(pick score) 12. Oklahoma State at
2. USC at Alabama Mississippi State
3. Holy Cross at Army 13. Villanova at Maryland
4. California at Oregon 14. Wake Forest at Nebraska
5. Colgate at Navy 15. Oklahoma at
6. Colorado State at Southern Methodist
New Mexico State 16. UCLA at Oregon State
7. Duke at Florida 17. North Carolina State at
8. South Carolina at Richmond
Georgia Tech 18. Pacific at Texas at El Paso
9. Washington State at Kansas 19. Virginia at Virginia Tech
10. Kentucky at North Carolina 20. Oshkosh at Weber State

Gridde Pickings

_ i

In addition, the athletic depart-
ment is exploring the possibility
of hosting a professional football
exhibition doubleheader at Mich-
igan Stadium. A large percentage,
of the gate from the doublehead-:
er, which could be held as early as:
next year, would go to the depart-
ment.
There is also a "strong possi-
bility" that the conference office
% will license a Big Ten seal of ap-
proval that would be placed on
various types of sporting equip-
ment, according to Michigan ath-
letic director Don Canham, a
member of the Big Ten commit-
tee on licensing and merchandiz-
ing. It has been estimated that the
granting of the seal could produce!
thousands of dollars for each con-:
ference school.
MEANWHILE, informed sources
*have disclosed that the financial-!
ly-troubled Big Ten is giving ser-
ious consideration to a proposal
that would allow the conference's
second place basketball team to
attend the National Invitational
Tournament in New York, with
the team's share of the tourna-
ment money to be divided among
the ten conference schools.
Last year, three schools - re-
ported to be Wisconsin, Illinois,!
and Northwestern-ran a deficit!
in their athletic department oper-
ations, even after such outside
funds as student fees and alumni
contributions were considered.
Michigan ran up a deficit of'
$114,000 on a total budget of over!
$2.5 million last year in its actual
operation. However, alumni con-!
tributions allowed the department
to show a slight profit on the year.
Most of the surplus revenue this
year will come from increased gate!
receipts from football games,1
which should total about $2.3 mil-j
lion for home and away games,
an increase of more than $300,000
from last year. Another $100,000
is expected from football-related
activities-$37,500 for the national!
television rights to two Michigan
games, and more than $50,000 in!
parking concessions.
AIDED BY a massive advertis-!
ting campaign with a budget dou-
ble that of last year, advance
home game ticket sales have,
shown a significant increase. Of-'
ficials expect home attendance to
be between 480-500,000 for six
games, compared with 428,780 last
4 year.
At the same time, three of
Michigan's four road games -
Washington, Purdue and Ohio
State-are sold out, and more!
than 50,000 are expected at the
Michigan-Wisconsin game. This
would make the total road at-
S tendance about 260,000, up more!
than 50,000 from the attendance
at last year's four r'oad games.
The teams split all receipts from!
football games. On the basis of
receipts of $6 per ticket, the total
increase in football revenue will
be slightly over $600,000, or about
4 $300,000 for each school.
Although student tickets are
sold at a discount, the revenue
from programs and concessions
averages out to $6 per paying cus-
tomer., Last year, for example,
Michigan's share of the total home
game was just over $1.3 million, or
about $6 for 224,390 attendance.
OFFICIALS also expect basket-!
ball, which last year ran at a
slight deficit, to show a profit this
year. The department will again
finance a stepped-up advertising
and promotion campaign in an
effort to sell more tickets to home
games. The home school keeps the
entire basketball gate.
Additional revenue is expected
from Michigan's share of the
Rainbow Classic in Hawaii, one
of the country's wealthiest and
most successful tournaments, and
the Michigan Invitational, to be
held at Crisler Arena Dec. 21-22.

NIGHT EDITOR:
MORT NOVECK
Although the terms of the con-
tract for the Knicks-Pistgns ex-
hibition have not been disclosed,
it is believed that the athletic de-
partment will get a large percent-
age of the expected sell-out crowd.
A profit is also hoped for from
the NCAA gymnastics f i n a 1s,
which will be held here next
spring. The athletic department is,
selling season tickets to gymnas-
tics meets for the first time this
year. Single tickets will also be
sold to the NCAA meet.
Smaller profits are expected
from the sale of Michigan's foot-
ball press book, an athletic record
book, and subscriptions to a sports
newsletter, to be published 20
times a year.
Alumni contributions through
Michigan booster clubs such as
the Victors and the Maize and
Blue are also expected to show an
increase this year, adding to the
overall surplus.
The increase in advertising ex-
penditures, which thus far has
been directed towards promoting
football ticket sales, has been
used for additional space adver-
tising in newspapers, the mailing
of thousands of ticket flyers, and
Sthe distribution of more than
10,000 youth brochures, detailing
group discounts for high school,
junior high school and elementary
school children.
CANHAM SAID last week that
licensing of novelties and a con-'
ference seal of approval are "very
close" to becoming a reality. The
committee is tentatively scheduled
to meet again next month to con-
sider the possibilities.
Noting the National Football
League has had tremendous suc-
cess with similar licensing and
merchandizing techniques. Can-
ham suggested the possibility of
having manufacturers give away
Big Ten novelties with their pro-
ducts, paying the conference and
the school a certain royalty for
each item that was distributed.
The Big Ten could "never hope,
to equal the NFL's dollar volume
in this area, which approaches
several million dollars annually, he
said. But he noted there is a po-
tential market area of more than
40 million people around the ten
conference schools that could
make the idea "highly successful."
U-M BARBERS

-Associated Press

Which way did they go?

Major League Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
East East
W I. Pct. GB W L Pct. GB
Baltimore 90 51 .638 - Pittsburgh 75 66 .532 -
New York 81 60 .574 9 New York 74 66 .529 1,
Detroit 74 67 .525 16 Chicago 74 67 .525 1

No Virginia, it's not a doubles
match. It's righty Dennis Ral-
ston (on the right, naturally)
defeating lefty Rod Layer
(shown on the left running to
the right) in an upset yesterday
at the U.S.Open Championships
in Forrest Hills, N.Y. For those
interested the scores were, 7-6,
7-5, 4-6, and 6-3. In other ac-
tion, Cliff Richey defeated Man-
uel Santana of Spain, Tony
Roche took Tom Gorman and
Brian Fairlie downed Tito Vas-
quez.

Fr-

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Chicago

73 68.
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65 75
West
83 56
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76 64
54 86
53 87
49 92

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Yesterday's Results
Baltimore 6, Detroit 3
Boston 4, Cleveland 3
New York 7, Washington 3
Kansas City 12, California 0
Milwaukee 3, Minnesota 2
Other clubs not scheduled
Today's Games
Boston at Detroit, night
Milwaukee at Kansas City, night I
Oakland at Minnesota, twi-night
California at Chicago, twi-night
Washington at Cleveland, night
New York at Baltimore, nightG
Kunstler s
Cutting!.

Yesterday's Results
Chicago 10, Pittsburgh 3
New York 10, Montreal 5
St. Louis 6, Philadelphia 3
Atlanta at Los Angeles, inc.
Cincinnati at San Francisco, inc.
Houston at San Diego, inc.
Today's Games
Philadelphia at New York, twi-night
Montreal at Chicago
St. Louis at Pittsburgh
Cincinnati at Los Angeles, night
Atlanta at San Diego, twi-night
Houston at San Francisco

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September 11
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