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April 08, 1971 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-04-08

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,Thursday, April 8, 1971'W I

Pc~ge Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, April 8, 197I~

The+
By RICHARD LEHFEL
A few days after the in
of Laos, there was a1
march in Ann Arbor. It
out to be one of the moreb
attended political events
year at the University;
4,000 people showed up, w
damn good going for Ann
I was at that march wit]
of my friends. We were
a fairly cynical frame of
mistrusting as usual the v
our attendance while re
at the same time we had
sort of duty to be there. W+
there (as the saying goes
counted, and we left bef
post-march rally had ende
slogans became a bit t
inane: "We're going to
down Washington," etc.)
After dinner, we didt
vious, turning on the TV t
the news and analyze the
of our actions and of the;
of other students across th
try. The report given o
was that demonstrations o
puses were so lightly atten
to -be hardly worth men
And then, on came Eric S
to explain the reasons f
rising tide of apathy, as he
it.
It was, in short, a most
ing analysis given that iti
to the letter what hada
occurred. (I am not speak
of Ann Arbor. During the
break, I heard of similar
in Chicago and Berkeley.)
in front "of our illustratec
tamn of wisdom, watchingt
nest eyes of Mr. Severeid
came difficult for us to
that hie could possibly be
Perhaps the rally had nev
en place, perhaps Americ
was mellowing; and perN
ought to just give in to th
ing, zingy new feeling
currently enveloping Aine
What is Reality? ! Io
things were different, ren
The spring of 1968 was a b
for campus political acti
the wake of the first ui
shutdown (Columbia: May
there was a rash of actic
nearly a full year, the me
an intimate love-hate r
ship with campus politics
News! Even the staid Ne
Times took to publishing

media: A
LDT scorecard (literally) of w'hich
nvasion universities had been taken over
protest on the front page of the paper.
turned It led to the universal Media
heavily Feedback Phenomenon: an event
of the which draws substantial publicity
some will repeat itself which leads to
'hich is more publicity which leads to
Arbor. reoccurrence which . . . until the
h a few public gets bored or upset at
all in ,which point the hard-wcrking
f mind, media must go out ani search
alue of for new saleable commodities.
ealizing I have come to distrust com-
d some pletely the existence of trends
e were in the temper of this country un-
0 to be less one attributes them totally
ore the to the media, and this is a con-
d. (The clusion I choose to avoid because
oo too it scares me too much. I doubt
close that 1969 was The Year of the
Revolutionary Fervor as much
the ob- as I doubt that 1971 is The Year
o watch of Peace, Love and Mellowing.
effects There is no doubt, thougfh, that
actions there are many people who either
e coun- believe or would love to have
)n CBS others believe that 1971 signals
n cam- just such a change in Nmerica.
nded a s The last thing that I read be-
tionmg. fore the spring break was Neal
evereid Gabler's superb review of "Love
or this Story" (book, movie and philoso-
e called phy), and a lot of things came
into focus for me througn that
t amaz- aritcle. For the mood which Eric
ignored Severeid described as so per-
actually vasive coincided exactly with
ing just Gabler's description of the Love
spring Story-Tricia Nixon ethos. What
rallies wonderful, digestible pap, and
Sitting what wonderously easy stuff to
d foun- deal with on the political level!
it e- I checked out the Bestseller
believe List for more meaty information.
wrong. Love Story topped the Fiction
ver tak-~ List and The Greening of Ameri-
a really ca the Non-Fiction List. The lat-
aps we ter book, for those of you who
is rous- have chosen because of moral
that is scruples to remain dormant, tells
rica... the story of the non-violent revo-
an 1968, lution which is currently taking
member? over the country. This "revolu-
big time tion" is a consciousness revolu-
vity. In tion, Consciousness III to be ex-
iiversity act, and it emanates largely
y, 1968), from (where else) troubled, alien-
on. For ated youth. This should make us
dia had all feel righteously proud, no?
elation- In other words, our "life-style"
. It was (clothing, drugs, music and ap-
w York pearance are among the cate-
a daly gories Charles Reich, the author
------ of the book, eouches on) is the

love-hate with

rock

revolution. Not a means, not an
end, but the Revolution Itself.
Who could possibly feel threat-
ened by such an innocuous thing
as life-style, non-violent life-style
to be exact? More delectable pap
for the masses?
During the spring break, in a
moment of weakness, I picked
up "Time" Magazine to find out
what was going on in the world,
and there, on the cover, was a
Peter Max-ish representation of
James Taylor, under the title
"The New Rock: Bittersweet
and Low." Of course, it turned
out to be more of the same. The
basic thesis of the article was
that rock music as we have
known it in the Sixties is dead.
This is, of course, one of the
more familiar national. media
topics; in fact, one rarely sees
articles about rock music in
magazines like Time unless it is
to announce the death of rock or
the death of a rock superstar.
This James Taylor article,
though, was sparklingly different
in its depiction of what the new
rock was, viz bittersweet and
low. As "Time" so gently puts it:
". . . (it is) an intimate mix-
ture of lyricism and personal ex-
pression - the often exquisitely
melodic reflections of a private
'I.
The ironies of that beautifully
turned euphemism are not ap-
parent until one takes a look rat
Time's "informal family tree of
rock." A good 90 per cent of
"Time's" new "gentle trouba-
dours of youth" come from some
of the biggest rock groups of the
Sixties, most notably the Beatles
themselves. Timewould have u
believe that the reason for this
new flowering of solo careers is
a burning need for self-expres-
sion - a need which for some in-
explicable reason could not be
fulfilled in a group situation.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
CONCERT DANCE
ORGANIZATION
PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPT.
21st ANNUAL
Spring Dance
Concert
Barbour Gym-
Dance Studio

Perhaps the Beatles themselves
are the easiest example(s) to,
focus on, since they have given
us such a tantalizing glimpse of
the realities of the creative pro-
cess in a rock group in the film
Let It Be. As edited and biased
as the movie quite obviously it,
it is fascinating nonetheless - -
and very depressing in its depic-
tion of the Beatles in their last
days as a group. There is petty
squabbling, frustrating non-com-
munication, and elegantly mask-
ed power-playing. John Lennon,
in his recent "Rolling Stone" in-
terview, states outright that the
Beatles ceased to be a harmon-
iously functioning group shortly
after the release of Sgt. Pepper.
In Let It Be, we have a picture
of the difficulties of creation in a
rock group, and therefore a total-
ly different outlook on what Time
refers to as that driving need
for individual expression. In fact,
"Time's" description of "the
often exquisitely melodic reflec-
tions of a private 'I' " coincides
very closely with the definition
of "ego-tripping." For true self-

expression should in no way be
hindered by the existence of P.
group. One need only listen to
any record by the Grateful Dead
to understand that a good group
dynamic can only enhance self-
expression. And "Time':" ro-
manticized vision of the individ-
ual artist, naked before the eyes
of the world with his acoustic
guitar, is refreshingly naive to
say the least.
Oh yes, there is more in this
article, much more. For herein
we have the full story of the
talented children of Isaac
("Ike"!) and Trudy Taylor, all
but one of whom have released
records of their own, following
the profitable example of their
brother James. Complete with
vivid descriptions of the agonies
of upper-middle class life and an
extra - ordinarily thorough ac-
count of every drug James has
been on and every institution he
has been in. But he (and by ex-
tension his siblings) have seem-
ingly gotten it all together, James
to the tune of 1,600,000 copies of
See MEDIA, Page 8

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