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April 06, 1971 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-04-06

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age Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, Apri16, 1971

'U' student to face prosecution
under regental discipline rules

LIFE UNDER BOMBING
Refugees flee homes in Laos

91111

UILD

4

(Continued from page 1)
Downing will be represented by
University Attorney Peter For-
sythe, since, according to Christ-
ensen, the action occurred w h e n
Downing was acting in his capac-
ity as a University employe.
Possible sanctions against Eus-
tis include probation, suspension
and expulsion.
Although the meeting outside
of which the alleged act occurred
was the Regents' regular monthly
open session, the Administration
Bldg. was locked and students were
told theytold they should have ap-
plied for passes in advance to
enter the meeting.
A skirmish broke out between
students trying to enter the build-
ing and University security offic-
ials and Ann Arbor police.
Two other students have been
arrested as a result of the actions,
but Eustis is the only one as yet
facing both University and civil
charges.
The rules allow students facing
trial in civil court to postpone
their interim rules' hearing until
after their trials in civil court.
According to Hayes, seeking the
postponement is "one of the things
we are considering."
Other possibilities include seek-
ing a preliminary restraining or-
der against the hearing or chal-
lenging the constitutionality of the
interim rules themselves "on both
state and federal grounds," ac-
cording to! Hayes.
Since their inception, the rules
have been criticized by both stu-
dents and faculty members. Op-
ponents have charged that the rul-

es involve a denial of basic rights
to which defendants are entitled
in judicial proceedings.
These include trial by one's
peers and the guaranteed right of
the defendant to be present at his
trial. The rules allow for the hear-
ing officer to bar the defendant
from the trial if he becomes "dis-
ruptive" and to hold the t r i a 1
without him if he fails to appear.
Although Hayes criticizes t h e
rules, he said that "when you be-
gin to consider due process, you
find the rules look as if they've
been designed by someone very
much aware of the minimum
grounds for constitutionality - a
successful challenge is not a for-
gone conclusion.",
Souris, in a letter to Fleming

which was forwarded to E u s ti s ,
noted several reservations he has
to the rules, including the fact
that his "most serious reservation"
was that the trules procedure al-
lows the University to delegate re-
sponsibility for students "to one
outside the University."
Contacted last night, S o u r i s
would not comment specifically on
his reservations saying "my task
is to make sure Mr. Eustis is ac-
corded his rights."
Hayes says he asked Christensen
to "come forth with procedures for
filing charges against Mr. Down-
ing."
Eustis says he "would go along
with fighting" the charges in
whatever way his lawyer advises.

(Continued from page 1)
They estimate that it w o u1 d
take four people about a month
to dig a trench or hole suitable
for a family. Most households
report that they dug several
such hideaways during the
course of the heavy bombing.
"We would try to find places
where we thought the planes
wouldn't bomb," a 62 year old
woman from the Plain of Jars
has explained, "but in the end
they bombed everywhere."
As a result, the bombing caus-
ed heavy casualties - often as
high as 25 per cent in villages
surveyed. Most civilians were
killed or wounded by anti-per-
sonnel bombs, though victims of
500 pound bombs, napalm, frag-
mentation bombs and strafing

have also been recorded in re-
fugee camps.
Villagers explain that they
had to leave their retreats re-
gularly to raise food, care for
livestock, pound rice, and per-
form other such essential tasks.
Many casualties occurred dur-
ing these occasions.
Older people and children were
the main victims.
The refugees explain that the
children were the most likely
to become afraid and fail to
find shelter during a raid, or ac-
cidentally detonate a delayed-
action or unexploded bomb after
one. Older people, they say,
"could not run fast enough" or
did not react quickly due to the
disabilities of age.
Education, normal commerce,

religious observance and agri-
cultural production were severe-
ly curtailed. The bombing in
1964 and 1968 caused schools,
markets, cooperative stores and
pagodas to be relocated in the
forest. Heavier bombing after
that made regular groupings of
people almost impossible.
Fear of being seen from the
air also restricted farming ac-
tivities. By 1969 villagers had
abandoned most of their rice-
fields, turning to cultivation of
manioc in the forest and sub-
sistence plots of rice. They say
that they would mainly work on
their fields at night,* with the
aid of small kerosene lamps.
Harvested rice lying out in the
open was a particular target.
They describe long and often
hazardous porterage as one of
the greatest hardships. They say
that before the bombing began
the Pathet Lao army handled its
logistics by itself.
NATIONAL QHN@RAL%
}
' C N. MAPlE R0.
ass- aoa
Last Times Tonite
"HUSBANDS"
7.QO & 9:30

TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY--APRIL 6, 7
RATTLE. OF. ALGIERS
dir. GILL} PONTECORY4 (France) 1967
Here it is again: the revolutionary's handbook in
film. Documentary reconstruction of the 1957 Alger-
ian Revolution. Exhilarating and believable-one of
the truly revolutionary films.

! & 9:05 .M.
662-8871

75c

ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

t

SGC unit considers charges against Daily

I

(Continued from page 1) !
March 30, the first day of the elec-
tions, Nelson said the Daily had'
not provided enough time for re-
sponse from candidates not en-
dorsed.
At a hearing on the complaint
last Sunday, the Senior Editors did
not send a representative, and in-
stead filed a statement with the
Credential and Rules Board which
denied that The Daily was subject
to the rules of SGC.
"The Senior Editors feel . . . that
the criticism as to the orief period
between endorsements and the elec-
tion is quite sound, and we hope to
be able to print future endorse-

ments of candidates in SGC elec-
tions several days prior to the elec-z
tion," the statement said.
"It is quite another matter to
concede that Council or 'tther gov-
erning bodies have the power ort
the right to impose such a rule upon
The Daily, or indeed, upon any
newspaper," the statement added.
The Credential and Rules Board]
subsequently found The Dailyf
guilty of violating the rule, but .
stated it was "uncertain of the con-
stitutionality of the law."
In order to assure that The Daily
appeal the ruling to SGC, and
thereby elicit a determination of
constitutionality, the board fined
Kraftowitz $6, just enough to have
a "hold credit" placed on his ac-
count if he declines to pay. I
Kraftowitz believes the fine is in-
valid because:
-The content of The Daily is

for the content and policies of the
newspaper; and
-The Senior Editors received
editorial freedom from the Regents
in 1968, and are empowered to de-
termine what is printed and when
it is printed;
Kraftowitz adds that the Senior
Editors "hope that SGC will recog-
nize our sincerity in adopting the
thrust of its new rule.

"But we cannot, in good con- -
science, allow SGC, or any politi-
cal body on which we report estab-
lish a precedent where it can con-
trol the editorial content of The
Daily.
"It is only when a newspaper's
editorial freedom is curtailed, or
there is a threat of curtailment,
that governing bodies are able to
act without answering to the pub-
lic," Kraftowitz says.

__ _ .. ,.

- I

BULLETIN
DAILY OFFICIAL
The Daily Offickal Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before
2 p.m.,. of the day preceding pub-,
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices are not accepted for
pubication. For more information,
phone 764-9270.
TUESDAY, APRIL 6
Day Calendar
Baseball: Michigan vs. Bowling Green,
Fisher Stadium, 2 p.m.
English and Extension Service: A.
Burgess. poetry reading, Multipurpose
Rm, UGLI, 4:10 p.m.
Ecology Center: C. Humphrey, found-
er, Ecology Action, "Environmental
Movement and Ecological Life Styles,"
YMCA, Fifth and William St., 7:30 p.m.
School of Music: Collegium Musicum,
T. Taylor, musical. dir., University Re-
formed Church, Huron at Fletcher St.,
8 p.m.
Professional Theatre Prog.: "Hair,"
Hill Aud, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
All present and prospective education
deustnts: Positions open for grads -
undergrads on Ed. School's appraisal,
curriculum, and executive committees;
applics. available in 2000 SEB, by 2nd
fl. elevator,SEI ofc.; due April 9.
TONIGHT SOLD OUT
HILL AUD.-8:30
HA IR

Foreign

Visitors

3020 Washtenaw
MATINEE EVERY DAY
BOX OFFICE
OPENS 12:45

Following individual can be reached
thru Foreign Visitor Div., Rms. 22-24,
Mi. Union, phone 764-2148: Mr. M.
Benchekroun. Moroccan Inst. of Res.
and Arabization, Rabat, April 4-11.

ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
The Ecology Center Seminar Series
presents: Cliff Humphrey "The En-
vironmental Movement and Ecological
Lifestyles", Tues., April 6, Ann Arbor!
YMCA, 5th at Williams Street, 7: :3:0
p.m.
Join The Daily Staff
Petitioning N
UWA.C. 1
z ~Events Cc

under the supervision of the nine
Senior Editors collectively, none of
whom is individually responsible
SALE ON
CONCORD
PRODUCTS
at f
HI :1 STUDIO
121 W. WASHINGTON
Downtown across from
Old German Restaurant
NO 8-7942

A mailboy
and a
tuned-in f
Chimp
give
the network
brass a
KING
KONG
HEADACHE!-
WALT DISNEY
productiond
THE
h. BAREFum
EXEC.". Tin
t TECHNIGOLOR10 Q)
n Wit Div" Prim

i

STARTS TOMORROW
Vj] Z[4wi
IN VII
GP COLOR by Detuxe' United Artoo

Ann Arbor Film Cooperative

i

TONIGHT,

April 6, presents

D.H. LAWRENCE'S

SHOW TIMES
1-3-5-7-9

EVERY WED
IS LAQI ES DAY
1 to 6 P.M.

I

ow open For'
971 Fall
DMmittee

Theatre will be
closed after
EVERY
Performance
an Sunday,
April 11 th

I

(formerly Homecoming)
Tentative Positions:

Transportation
Publicity
Floats
Treasurer
Graphics

Secretary
Parade
Tickets
Special Events
Alumni Relations

Pick up petitions and sign up for interviews
at UAC offices, second floor Union

"
O

FOR LAUGHING. OUT LOUD!

LAST DAY !
" ,ADULTS
0 N IL.Y
48:-3300
SEX RITUdhS Of,
THE OCCULTCOLOR :
STRAIN THE BOUNDS OF .
THE IMAGINATION
people who know no limits in a
search for erotic sexual ecstasy
Nil
7AW MWESYMY
" j
e n e m8d
PHONE
482-3300 FREE
LIGHTEDPA R K I

Georges Feyde
The Girl from A
at 8 P.M.-Wednesday-Saturda
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE--Box Office Opens

'u

40x*lms
3y-April 7-10
12:30-668-6300

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 'LAYERS

i

STARTS TOMORROW

$2.50 TOP!-OPENS WEDNESDAY---TICKETS NOW!

I

i

11

O.aouLTs
ONLY
6821930-

HOPWOOD LECTURE
TED SOLOTAROFF
Critic and editor. Former editor of COMMENTARY and
BOOK WEEK. Presently editor of NEW AMERICAN RE-
VIEW. Author of THE RED HOT VACUUM.
The Practical Critic:
A Personal View
Announcement of the Hopwood Awards for 1971

Doaace

I

I

"
a garden
of sensuality
teenie
t1blip

0

I

A464MMS
sexual
,;," brutality
and
.''murder

t

+ry
1r Adults Only
a ClNEX film:

I1

I

i

r.2

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