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April 01, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-04-01

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Residential College Players
present

page t o ree
Thursday, April 1, 1971

C14C

Siiri!3an

atly

NEWS PHONE: 764-0554
BUSINESS PHONE: 764.0554

NIGHT EDITOR: ROBERT SCHREINER

ENDGAME
and
BEDTIME STORY

by Samuel Beckett
by Sean O'Casey

Page Three

CONGRESS CONSIDERS AMENDMENTS:

4*

A :ril 1, 2, 3--8 P.M.
EAST QUAD AUD.
-ADMISSION 50c-

"1

I

news briefs
By The Associated Press

House

rejects

draft

end

Writer-In-Residence
presents
GARY SNYDER
March 29 thru April 4
M During the week Snyder will read his poetry and
hold lectures and discussions on ecology, an-
thropology, Asian culture, Zen, Red power.
THURSDAY-lecture on Zen poetry and painting
Angelt Hall, Auditorium B-8 p.m.
SATURDAY-discussion at South Quad, 2 p.m.

THE MICHIGAN SUPREME COURT yesterday upheld a voter-
approved constitutional amendment forbidding public aid to private
and parochial schools.
The court also said the amendment does not cancel any programs
carried out by the state in aid of parochial schools except for direct
grants to them.
The court said "auxiliary services" such as health examinations,
speech correction, visiting teachers and remedial reading and special
counselors for delinquent, disturbed and mentally handicapped children
are permitted if performed by public employes under public direction.
* * *
HOUSE DEMOCRATS yesterday adopted a compromise end-
the-war resolution that aims at withdrawal of U.S. troops from
Indochina by the end of 1972.
The 132 to 68 vote for the resolution at a party caucus marked a
shift in sentiment in the House,{which has steadfastly supported ad-
ministration policy in Vietnam in the past.
The key provision of the resolution declares the sense of the Demo-
crats in the House to be that the House "should work to end the U.S.
military involvement in Indochina and to bring about the release of,
all prisoners at a certain time, during the 92nd Congress."
. * *
THE HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE added $101.1j
million to President Nixon's 1972 school budget yesterday in the first
of the annual money bills sent to the House floor.
It recommended new appropriations of $4.77 billion for the Office
of Education and related agencies for the fiscal year starting July 1.j
This is $251 million more than was provided for the current year
and technically $298 million less than Nixon requested for the comingr
Iyear.
However, the funds requested included $400 million which the com-I
mittee could not approve because it requires separate authorization inI
legislation not yet acted on, providing for a National Student Loan
Association to handle the student loan program.
. * *
A U.S. COURT OF APPEALS yesterday upheld the right of
a union to strike selected railroads, but ordered a further hearing
by a lower court to determine whether the union was bargaining in
good faith.
The current case with its implied strike threat began in 1970 when
some 170 railroads were involved in labor disputes with four unions.
Settlement was reached with three of the unions earlier this year, but!
the transportation union failed to go along with the settlement.
* * *
THE FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD differed with the Nixon ad-
ministration yesterday in calling for a six-month limit on the Presi-
dent's power to control wages and prices.{
Specifically, the board favored a House-passed amendment that
would restrict wage and price controls to six months if the President
ever decided to impose them.

WASHINGTON (R) - An effort to abolish the draft and
the entire Selective Service System as the manpower supplier
for the Indochina war was rejected by the House yesterday
E73 to 11.
At the same time the House wrote draft deferments for
divinity students back in to a two-year draft-extension bill
by a 114-29 vote.
The amendment to dismantle the draft system was intro-
duced by pep. Bella Abzug, (D-N.Y.), who said that action
should be "merely the first -
step to ending that ignomin- e
ous war in Indochina." 7 7 1
It was quickly and easily reject- 1 y

dThe House was considering a
draft extension bill nearly tripling
President Nixon's pay-boost in-
centives for his "zero draft" all-
volunteer army plan - to $2.7
billion from his $987 million re-
quest.
".:, . >;.::;;;:,: ,;,.:The bill also would authorize
Pr sident Nixon to establish stu-
-Associated Press dent draft deferments and in-
crease the nonmilitary service ob-
Pakistani war damage ligation for conscientious object-
.East Pakistani civilians probe through the wreckage following two ors to three years from two.
Abzug's amendment would have
days and nights of fierce attacks by units of the Pakistan army on dismantled the Selective Service
strongholds of the East Pakistan independence movement. Civil System as of next Jan. 1. She said
war broke out Friday after Sheik Mujibur Rahman proclaimed East that step by Congress should be
Pakistan independent from the central government. followed by cutting off all funds

March 31-April 3
Trueblood Theater
Noel Coward's
Presented by
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre

8:00 P.M.

TEAMSTER CASE:

-. __ i
-- - -

Board denesHoffa
bid for prison parole

I
I

WASHINGTON (W) - The U.S.
Parole Board yesterday denied
parole to Teamsters Union Presi-
dent James Hoffa.
The refusal to give Hoffa his
freedom means he will not be
able to retain control of the
Teamsters Union when his term
as president expires in July.
Hoffa, who has remained presi-
dent of the Teamsters while in the
federal penitentiary at Lewis-
burg, Pa., was turned down when
he first sought parole on Oct. 2,

1969. He entered Lewisburg
March 7, 1967 under an eight-year
sentence for jury tampering.
The board continued Hoffa's
case to June of 1972, long after
the union election next July.
Parole Board Chairman George
Reed said the seven members of
the board made the decision after
fully reviewing the entire record
of Hoffa's case.
A statement issued by the
board said Hoffa had been no-
tified of the decision.

for the war.
She said the draft system "made
possible the maintenance and es-
calation of the war in Indochina
without the approval of the
American people or indeed t h i s
body the House."
Rep. Charles Gubser, (R-Calif.),
said the deterrence to war is a,
strong American military and if
Abzug succeeded in cutting out
manpower forces the reliance
would have to go to nuclear wea-
pons.
The amendment by Rep. James
Byrne, (D-Pa.), to put divinity
deferments back into the bill was'
approved after speakers argued
the deferments preserve tradition-
al separationl of church and state
and have been granted in every
American war except the Civil
War.
President Nixon asked author-
ity to end draft deferments for
divinity as well as all other stu-
dents on grounds of fairness.

revolts1n
Ecuador
QUITO, Ecuador (P) -- A mili-
tary faction headed by an ousted
general revolted yesterday against
the government of. ose Maria Vel-
asco Ibarra, elected president of
Ecuador five times and o u s t e d
three times.
The nation's armed forces were
reported to be seriously divided,
with some units supporting the 78-
year-old president and others
backing the rebels.
The rebellion grew out of a mil-
itary quarrel. The leader of the
rebellion, Qen. Luis Jacome Cha-
vez, was ousted as head of the
War Academy Tuesday after de-
manding the regisnations of De-
fense Minister Jorge Acosta Vel-
asco and Gen. Julio Sacoto Mon-
tero, the army commander.
Velasco Ibarra was taken to the
Defense Ministry building where
he was holed up with his nephew,
the defense minister, informed
sources said. There they were at-
tempting to rally military forces
to crush the rebellion.
The ministry building was re-
ported surrounded by troops. Wit-
nesses said tanks and other ar-
mored vehicles had been sent to
Ecuador's War Academy, rebel
headquarters. The sympathies of
these forces was not clear.
CERTIFIED
ABORTION REFERRAL
ABORTION
patient handled with greatest
care and personal warmth af-
forded by medical professionals
(212) TR 7-8562
MRS. SAUL
ALL INQUIRIES CONFIDENTIAL

"1

BOX OFFICE OPEN
10 A.M. 'TIL CURTAIN
TICKETS-$2, $2.50
at Stanger's or call 764-5387

ann arbor film cooperative
PRESENTS
APRIL FOOLS DAY SPECIAL!
MARX'S BROTHERS in:
A NIGHT AT THE OPERA

.

ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE
'BEST FOREIGN FILM'
S Incredibly sensual 1-- N. Y. TIMES
"Without ever showing all
there is to show, without
pandering to the prurient
and the obvious, 'First Love'
becomes, through artistry
and an intelligent use of
sensuality, one of the
sexiest movies in years!"
-REX REED
(Cannes Film Festival, 1970)
"An extraordinarily
beautiful film!"
-WILLIAM WOLF, Cue Magazine
"A love story that is
universal and timeless! You
will see 'First Love'...for the
beautiful performances, for
the beautiful visuality and
for the beautiful Dominique
Sanda!"
-GENE SHALIT, NBC-TV
SIDNEY GLAZIER presents
MAXIMIUAN SCHELUS WINNER A
U S N S B S INFILM FESTIVAL.
FIRST LOVE JM91
'FIRST LOVE' 6:30 - 'QUACKSER' 8:10 - 'FIRST LOVE' 9:40
"One of the most delightful
comedy dramas in recent years !
Wilder's delicate blend of humor and pathos makes
the viewer thunk he is seeing young Charlie Chaplin!"

I

I

1_

I

Aud. A
Angell Hall

7-9:30
75c

For the student body:

NEXT WEEK-THE FOX & LAST SUMMER

LEVI'S

I

I

AT STATE &
LIBERTY STS.

BOX OFFICE OPENS 12:45

CORDUROY
Slim Fits ......$6.98
(All Colors)
Bells.........$8.50
DENIM

Bush - Jeans
Bells.....
Pre-Shrunk
Super Slims

. . $10.00
$8.00
$7.50
... $7.00

sponsored by
Creative Arts Festival 1971
APRIL 2-3 7 and 9 p.m.
Natural Science Auditorium
$1.50 at the door

I

I

i-
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty
I
A mailboy
and a
tuned-in . fI
Chimp
give
the network
brass a
KING
KONG
HEADA CHE!=

SWATDISNEY
productions
BAREIFOO
............ .::::.:.. EXECUTIVEg

tt trs TV

0 1 E..- i I e.. .1 .M v mwlq m ma-rx 0 1

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