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March 25, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, March 25, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

Pnne Ten

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Candidates for SGC
promote election bids
(Continued from page 1) instead of the political interests of
bent, with the present council," the individual memb'ers."
Griffin said. PC candidates have described
Student Caucus candidate Brad the ResponsiblesAlternative Party
Taylor, who has attacked the ticket as "more of a liberal
present Council for its "unrepre- ticket," but claimed that RAP
sentative" nature and "irrespon- charges of "fiscal irresponsibility
sible" spending policies, respond- are phony."
ing last night to the charges, said Young Socialist Alliance candi-
the SC candidates had openly date Betsy Henrickson said that
stated their positions on each as a member of a two person.
issue. ticket she could give "critical sup-
Taylor said that "PC candidates port" to those SGC candidates
were unwilling to wage their own that represent antiwar and wo-
'saturation' campaign out of fear men's liberation interests.
that if their true stance on the Five candidates, including two
issues were known the coalition incumbents, are r un n in g inde-
would suffer defeat." - pendently.
"They're just griping because Leaflets, sent for printing by the
they have failed to deal with the Student Caucus, were intercepted
issues effectively," SGC candidate and wording mutilated and alter-
Mary Schnelker commented. ed before they could be run off at
JGC incumbent Marnie Heyn the University Cellar.
remarked last night that the first A Student Caucus member, upon
"radical" SGC administration to learning of the action, informed
be elected also had a "Turn the the printing contractor and a new
rascals out" slogan in the 1966 leaflet was prepared. Taylor said
election. that no complaint would be lodged
Shirley Nickovich, a member of with the election's Credentials and
the Responsible Alternative Party Rules Committee because the in-
ticket said yesterday that "SGC cident had not had an effect on
has set itself up as the ultimate," their campaign and no other can-
and should be mdre concerned didates seemed involved in the
with *"the interests of the campus incident.

COMMUNISTS Ci

LAIM VICTORY

Laos drive ends as
allied troops routed
(Continued from page 1) hundred troops remainingf
American aircraft on a trail.com- pulled out within the next th
plex a half mile west and one mile weeks.
southwest of the border outpost of Besides the shellings, the No
Lao Bao. Vietnamese ambushed Ameri
Helicopter gunships r a k e d the forces in S o u t h Vietnam al
column with rocket fire and jet Highway 9, the main route i
fighter bombers attacked with na- Laos.
palm, rockets and cannon fire. As a result of American
Khe Sanh, the main U.S. sup- support for the invasion, the
port base near the Laotian border, command reported 89 helicopt
has been shelled for the last 10 lost, 51 Americans killed, 28 mi
days. Officers at Khe Sanh put ing and 78 wounded. Many ot
yesterday's total at 108 shells, both helicopters were damaged or
artillery and rockets. They said 82 down but subsequently recover
rounds fell yesterday morning and
26 in the evening, the latter near In Washington, Secretary ofI
the base's air strip. As many as fense Melvin Laird conceded
200 shells per day have hit the the South Vietnamese ended
base. drive sooner than planned bec-
American C130 c a r g o planes of "the tremendously viciouse
landed at Khe Sanh between the violent reaction on the part of
barrages bringing in fuel and am- North Vietnamese."
munition for units still operating The South Vietnamese t
in the northwest corner of South force in Laos at the peak
Vietnam. 22,000 men, and in the f
About four units involving sev- phases of the withdrawal field
eral hundred American troops ports said it was outnumbe
have moved out of Khe Sanh. 2 to 1.
Preparations were made to destroy
facilities there after the several In summing up the Laotian

are
ree
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can
ong
into
air
U.S.
ters
iss-
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shot
red.
De-
that
the
ause
and
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was
inal
re-
ered
op-

______________

ii

i,.

EASY PICK-UP

Announcing the opening of a new- store

A LBATROSS

Sony's New
Model 120:
The Lightweight
Portable with a
Built-in Mike..

Home Furnishings-
Beanbag Chairs
Candles
Tapestries

Lamps
Pillows
Rugs

~12995

Wa terbeds

YOU NEVER HEARD IT SO GOOD

524 E. William at Maynard

MON.-THURS. 10-6
FRI. 10-8:30
SAT. 10-7

.I

AAl-Es BUYS
Ann Arbor-East Lansing

618 S. MAIN

769-4700

"Quality Sound Through Quality Equipment"

Friday Noon Luncheon
35c

'L

!ml

"THE WAY TO PEACE
IN INDOCHINA"
-a report on the peace conference in Paris by
a recent visitor from Ann Arbor

'II I-P

04

Prof. John A. Bailey
(Near East Lang. and Lit.)

-- I

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Bach Club Meeting, Thurs., March 25,
8 p.m., S.Q., West Lounge, "Contem-
porary Reactions Concert" (45 min.), of*
works by Bach Club members in the
style of Bach, Mozart & Brahms; fea-
turing works for 4 handed piano and
string orchestra. Homemade Italian
Chili!' Everyone invited!
Ageless Science of Yoga. Instruction
in the 'Yoga exercises as taught by
qualified instructors. Sponsored by Self-
Realization Fellowship. Call Dale after
6 *p.m. at 761-9825.

Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices are not accepted for
publication. For more information,
phone 764-9270.
THURSDAY, MARCH 25
Day Calendar
Wildlife and Fisheries Lecture: J. Bry-
an, U. of Efitish Columbia, "Feeding
History and Food Selection in"Trout,"
1040 Nat. Res., noon.
Campus Crusade for Crist: J. Engel,
OSU, "The Unique Role of Faculty in
Helping to Change the World," Conf.
Rm. 5, Mi. League, noon.
Resonance Lunch Seminar: H. Shore,
U. of Calif., "Paralectric Resonance and
Relaxation," P&A Colloq. Rm, noon.
Computing Center: S. Gerstenberger,
"Use of Magnetic Tapes in MTS," 1011
N. University Bldg., 3 p.m.

Comparative Studies of History: I.
Goldman, "An Anthropologist Looks at
Comparative History," Aud. D., Angell
Hall, 4 p.m.
Graduate Coffee Hour: 4th fI 1 o o r,
Rackham, 4 p.m.
Speech Dept. Performance: "And We
Own the Night," Arena Theatre, Frieze
Bldg., 4:10 p.m.
International Night: Mexico, Michi-
gan League Cafeteria. 5 p.m.
Scottish Country Dance: Women's
Athletic Bldg., Forrest St., Upstairs gym,
7:30 p.m.
Creative Arts Festival: "Sid Shryrock
Goes to Africa," E. Quad. Aud., 8 p.m.
School of Music: University Varsity
Band, G. Cavendar, conductor, Hill
Aud., 8 p.m:
Michifish: Annual Water Show, Mar-
garet Bell Pool, 8:15 p.m.
PDE Medical Fraternity: Dr. A. Kan-
trowitz, Sinai Hosp. of Detroit, "Fron-
tiers in Modern Cardiac Surgery," N.
Lecture Hall Aud., Med. Sci. II, 8:30
p.m.

eration, launched Feb. 8, Lt. Col.
Tran Van An, chief spokesman for
the South Vietnamese command
said government f o r c e s accom-
plished "80 to 90 per cent of their
objectives."
U.S. intelligence sources said
the North Vietnamese were repair-
ing parts of the trail cut by the;
South Vietnamese and were re-
building at Sepone, the supply hub
25 miles from the South Vietna-
mese border. Captured March 6,
Sepone marked the deepest South
Vietnamese penetration into Laos.
The Pathet Lao said in a broad-
cast yesterday they do not intend
to try to capture -King Savang
Vathana's capital as long as the
premier, Prince Souvanna Phou-
ma, retains "some semblance of
neutrality." This was taken to
mean a warning to rightists not
to attempt a coup.

Interfaith Council for Peace

Guild House

802 Monroe

FRIDAY, 6 P.M.-Roost Beef Dinner $1.10
Reservations limited-662-5189 or 663-2362
- ----------------

al

original works of graphic art-etchings, lithographs,-
by leading 20th century artists.

4fi

Pablo Picasso
Salvador Dali,

Johnny Friedlaender
Alexander Calder

}vyvra ti} s.7.tLl: ?:4'j"i:{i{?'{Rlrh{}w;. x _ ,aa;"Y L{}?:r''?: i: L: ; .';'" :i".M

Marc Chagall
Joan Miro
and others.

..
.. ?i}i::M }n .Lr
iii::: : "hv :i iiii 14:i 4 5:"i::.:pr:ii.{'>:}:}: 'i'::i: +'> :''Si::::: : ti f' i" .-"i iih . :\+v " i'r:v "v..v.j":;i.' : iti ;j: \
i. nr: :j4r. :.i:. .rrvXA\:f.. vS::'r i ...iX.v - '
yr ::.:.;.... :. :.. :.... ., hJO.......aRak..fi.:: . . _.::..<a.{.!<:

Student organizations funding and
finance workshop. Thurs., March 25,
7:30 p.m. OSO conf. rm. 3A Union
(South Wing).
Scottish Country Dancing for men
and women. Always open to begin-
ners. Instruction provided. E v e r y
Thursday, 7:00 p.m. WAB gym.
Women's Liberation - Brown bag
lunch,: every Friday, 12-2. Women's
Liberation Office 1510 SAB.
* * * * i
Ann Arbor Tenants Union: meeting
every Thursday, 7:30 p.m. in 1528 SAB,
office open 12-7 p.m. Mon. - Fri.
* * *~ *
China Cinema: Chinese Students' As-
sociation, Saturday, March 27, 7 & 9
P.M., Aud. BI, Angel Hall, movie: "Storm
Over Yangtze Kiangj"
* * * *
UM Graduate Outing Club, every Sun.,
rain or shine, 1:30 p.m., meet at
Huron St. side of Rackham where cars
will leave for an afternoon of hiking.
Dinner is optional after the hike.
* * * *
Division I - Teacher Education, Re-
presentative Assembly Meeting, March
25. 7:00 p.m., Room 2334, School of
Education.
** * *
Student Committee of the Sierre Club
will sponsor "Earth Ethics" - Free de-
monstrations, workshops and films.
March 29 - April 1. Watch for details!!!
New From Levi!
For the Student Body:
Boot Jeans
$S50
PRE-SH RUN K
CHECKMATE

An Informal Celebration.. .
SABBATH SERVICE
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT, 8:30 P.M., HILLEL
1429 HILL
ONEG AFTER THE SERVICE

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Tax-Rite
INCOME TAX SERVICE
109 S. FOURTH AVE.
761-7199
Weekdays 9-8; Sat. 9-5

-I

MERIDIAN GALLERY'S 2nd Annual Art Auction
SUNDAY, MARCH 28th
The Main Ballroom-WEBER'S INN
3050 JACKSON ROAD

Georges Rouault Victor Vasarely

Auction Time: 3:00 p.m.
All new works!

Exhibition of Art: 1 :00-3:00 p.m.
ADMISSION FREE

Roommates; or Know Your Enemy

STOP BY AND BUY
AT THE
10 a~m.-l0 p.m.
UNION BALLROOM
Macrme~~andesfptteypa- ifiXgg SSWare
phtoraphbs-eather goodscreaiv arts
-:
Da-ly C -assifieds Get Results
.. ... h...... ...h n .?vt... ~tr.;4:.:'si;:.":{4y:'~ii::t~i":84?.i.?i i- -' %4'Si~v:v;<tv:"r

1 11

:I

Is your contribution to mankind
being swept up on the 7:30 ru.n?

1l

Is your only mark on the world the
amount of garbage you put into it? Or are
you as concerned with the environment
as we are.
We publish Clear Creek. A positive
magazine about the environment, telling
precisely the way things are and what you
i n auoi iit

Get Clear Creek at a newsstand now.
50q a copy, $5.00 a year. For subscrip-
tions, write: Clear Creek, 617 Mission
Street, San Francisco, California 94105.
We've no illusions about saving the
world singlehandedly, but maybe if we all
got together.. .

a

ULRICH'S
OWNEI
Look for

I

Sunday, M

can aoabout it.
Regular features include articles by
Nader's Raiders and concerned scientists,
an organic cooking and gardening section
BOOKSTO RE - as well as a children's page. Our country. Ignore it and it will go away.
d e r n ew _ ---_------- -- -_- - - - - __.
RSHIP
)ur Huge OPEN LETTER TO
AD WATERBED FANS No. 2 Q
arch 28th
from TOM and HARRY, the original waterbedmen4
this one &
. EARFRIENDS,
Well, another week has gone by and we're still here. Surprised. Don't be. If we
' .weren't convinced waterbeds were here to stay, we never would have gotten into it.
PTED FOR We would have just gone out, bought one, and grooved on it, like you're probably
doing. But we've spent a lot of time with our waterbeds, and started seeing that there's
>>Ra whole lot of things that can go with a waterbed.
IT OR 4
We do not make our own products; we're a discount retailer and aren't attached4
to any particular product. We will always carry the highest quality waterbed products4
we can find at the lowest prices.-
*. I
EdItor We carry all sizes and seams of waterbeds-all different frame models-tapes-
tries and handmade waterbed covers-giant graphics that cover the wall of your water-

You'd think that with all the progress we've made in the educa-
tion game, somebody would have found a cure for roommates by now.
But no. Roommates remain as big a problem today as they were when
Ethan.Mather founded the first American college.
(Incidentally, despite what you've heard, Harvard was not the
first American college. Mr. Mather started his institution almost 100
years earlier. And it was quite an institution, let me tell you! Mr.
Mather built schools of liberal arts, fine arts, animal dentistry and
flintlock repair. He built a covered stadium for lacrosse that seated
200,000. Everywhere on campus was emblazoned the stirring Latin
motto CAVE MUSSI-"Watch out for moose." The student union
contained four bowling alleys, 21 horoscope machines and a 97-chair
barbershop.
(It was the barbershop, alas, that brought Mr. Mather's college
to an early and total end. The student body, alas, then'as now, con-
sidered haircuts an Establishment hangup, and nobody set foot in the
barbershop. The chief barber, Truscott Follicle by name, grew so de-
pressed staring at 97 empty chairs that one day his mind finally gave
way. Seizing his vibrator, he ran outside and shook the entire campus
until it crumpled to dust. This later became known as "Pickett's
Charge.")
But I digress. We were exploring ways for you and your roommate
to stop hating each other. This is admittedly no easy task, and yet it
is not impossible if you will both bend a bit, give a little.
I remember, for example, my own college days (Berlitz, '08). My
roommate was, I think you will allow, even less agreeable than most.
He was a Tibetan named Ringading whose native customs, while in-
disputably colorful~ were not entirely endearing. Mark you, I didn't
mind so much the gong he struck on the hour or the string of fire-
crackers he ignited on the half-hour. I didn't even mind that he singed
chicken feathers during his prayers at dawn and dusk. What I did
mind was that he singed them in my hat.
To be fair, he was not totally taken with some of my habits either
-especially my hobby. (I collect airplane tires and had, at that time,
nearly 400,000 of them in our room.)
Well sir, things grew steadily cooler between Ringading and me,
and they might actually have reached the breaking point had not we
each happened to receive a package from home one day. Ringading
opened his package first, smiled shyly at me and offered me a gift.
"Thank you," I said. "What is it?"
"Yak butter," he said. "You put it in your hair. In Tibet we call
it gree see kidstuff."
"Well now, that's mighty friendly," I said and offered him a gift
from my package.
"Thank you," he said. "What is it?"
"A can of Miller High Life Beer," I said.
"I will try it at once," he said and did.
"Not bad," he said.
"It is even better when you open the can," I said and showed
him how.
He consumed it forthwith. "Wowdow!" he cried. "Never have I
known such mellowness, smoothness, amberness and generalized
euphoria!"
"Have another," I said.
"Oh, I must not!" he cried. "Obviously a beverage of such splen-
dor is made only for rare occasions and is therefore difficult to obtain
and costly beyond the reckoning of it."
"Ha, ha, the joke is on you," I said. "Miller High Life is brewed
every single day by plain decent folks just like you and me and is avail-
able everywhere at a price well within the most modest of budgets."

A

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State Street at Liberty _

Don't miss

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4
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. k
2yy2 y.
>'ly
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