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March 19, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE Presents:
J. M. BARRI E'S
"TWELVE POUND LOOK"
8:00 P.M. Tonight and Sat. Night
at Civic Theatre Building
201 Mulholland Dr., Ann Arbor
One-Act Play Workshop-FREE
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

kPeace
By CHUCK WILBUR
"The trip to Paris has given us new
tools to work w it h in the anti-war
struggle," says Barbara Fuller, director
of the Interfaith Peace Council.
Fuller recently returned f r o m the
Paris peace talks as a representative of
theCitizen's Conference on Ending the
War in Indochina.
She and 170 other members of the
conference met two weeks ago with rep-
resentatives of the principal parties in
the Indochina conflict to gain a better
understanding of the requisites for
peace,
Conference members met with t h e
negotiating teams of the United States,
North Vietnam, the Provisional Revo-
page three

de lega t
lutionary Government PRG) of South
Vietnam, and the Saigon government.
The group also spoke with represen-
tatives of the Cambodian United Front
- a group opposing the Lon Nol regime
and United States and South Vietna-
mese intervention in Cambodia - and
members of "third force" or neutralist
elements of South Vietnam.
According to Fuller some of the con-
ference members were more skeptical of
the friendliness of the PRG and North
Vietnamese officials than she. "Yet I
found it hard to believe that the gen-
uineness which I continually encounter-
ed was put on," she said.
In contrast to the PRG and North
Vietnamese delegations, Fuller describ-

returi

ed the Saigon delegation as "terribly on
edge."
She felt this was because the South
Vietnamese knew that all the confer-
ence members opposed American in-
volvement in Vietnam and that "they
had been told that the only Americans
who opposed the war were long-haired
students. When they saw our straight
looking group they didn't know what to
think."
She s a i d the Saigon officials em-
phasized their call for a cease-fire in
South Vietnam. The PRG has opposed
a ceasefire until the United States sets
a date for the withdrawal of all its
forces from Indochina.
Although Fuller was not among the
12 conference members allowed to meet

Sfro I
with United States chief negotiatorI
vid Bruce, she was informed of the c4
versation.
Bruce had said that he was a ne
tiator and not a policy maker and I
he did not wish to discuss the histor:
the Indochina conflict.
Fuller met with several represen
tives of the "third force" in South Vi
nam - those who support neither
PRG nor the Saigon government -
cluding Buddist leader Thieh N:
Hahn, Au Truong Thanh, former e
nomics minister under the Ky gove
ment, now an exile in Paris, and v
representatives of Catholic anti-,
groups.
"Hahn stressed the need for ac
sation of killing on the part of b
~aitu.

sides in the war before the negotiating
of a political settlement of t h e con-
flict," Fuller said.
Thanh told the conference that form-
er South Vietnamese president General
"Big" Minh could win the presidential
election scheduled to take p la c e in
South Vietnam in Oct. 1971 "if the elec-
tions were not too rigged," Fuller said.
Minh was not allowed to run in the last
election and is now in exile.
It remains to be seen, Fuller noted,
whether or not he will be allowed to be
a candidate in October. Thanh felt that
the PRG would not refuse to negotiate
with Minh, as they have with the pres-
ent Saigon government.
See DELEGATE, Page 6

Pris

Ifritoitan

NEWS PHONE: 754-055
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Friday, March 19, 1971

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

CONTINUOUS SHOWINGS FROM 1 O'CLOCK

Cinema
PHONE
482-3300 FREE PANIG

am

{. ,l ' f It . 4
neWS briefs
{ ~~~~~By The Associated PrTess ' i:?'" V:
THE MEXICAN GOVERNMENT, angered at the formation of
a Communist guerrilla group by Mexicans trained in Moscow >
and 'North Korea, yesterday ordered the expulsion of five Soviet
diplomats. T ..::
Foreign Minister Emilio O. Rabasa said he had called the tem-
porary charge d'affaires of the Soviet Embassy, Dimitri A. Diakonov,.
and told him that he and four other diplomats were unwelcome
and mustleave. r
Mexico recalled its envoy to Moscow on Wednesday for consulta-
tions that were described by informed sources as "a temporary dipl.,- I:.."t
matic withdrawal."
HOUSE LEADERS suddenly switched plans yesterday and
put off until next Tuesday a vote on the proposed constitutional
amendment to lower the voting age to 18 in all elections.
The amendment, which is expected to pass overwhelmingly, was (f dhl
scheduled to be brought up as soon as the House completed work on Prime Minister Indira Gandhii
a bill for funding the Boeing supersonic transport. office in New Delhi, India, yester
But as soon as the vote on the SST was announced, Democratic----- -- ---
leadership cancelled the rest of the week's legislative program. TESTIMONY RER
TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS were treated yesterday bys
the Nixon administration as two programs were revealed to
Congress.u
A proposal to share $2.6 billion in federal revenue, touted as
promoting transit diversity, was spelled out to Congress in the{
President's fifth message on special revenue-sharing funds.so n d
Also presented to the Washington lawmakers was a proposal s i l pn
for a state by state reform of the auto insurance system based on
the no fault principal. The proposal was received by a lukewarm com- FT. BENNING, Ga. (A') - Lt.j
mittee but was strongly supported by the nation's insurance industry. William Calley Jr.'s jury asked
* * * ysedytberfehdote
ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIESTS in the United States have ..yeterday to be refreshed on the
indicated they are willing to accept married priests among their earliest stages of the 1968 Ameri~
rank, itwas epored ysteraycan infantry assault on My Lai, ;
ranks, it was reported yesterday.
The Rev. Frank Bonnike, president of the National Federation of { their resuest indicating a verdict
Priests' Councils, announced the acceptance when the federation at his military murder trial may}
voted 193-18 to ask American bishops to pursue an immediate end to be a long way off.
mandatory celibacy. The six-man panel, in its sec-
The federation, representing nearly 60 per cent of the nation's ond day of deliberation, asked to
59,000 clerics, also condemned continued U.S. involvement in the be read portions of the testimony
Vietnam war. of six witnesses about the bodies
Vietnamwar. G f 2nvIieif u ivil ill di

i

ArgenIne city
Britain hit by
From Wire Service Reports
Strikes in Britain and Argentina yesterday came near to
halting the business and industry of both countries.
Two million workers closed vital sectors of British in-
dustry in protest against the Conservative's government's
legislation to curb strikes, while a general strike paralyzed
Argentina's second largest city, Cordoba.
Troops riding tanks and armored cars patrolled the
streets of Cordoba, which has been declared under a state of
emergency. The city has been a center of resistance to
Argentina's military-backed

FOR THE 2nd WEEK
THE SUNDANCE KID and C.W. MOSS (of Bonnie & Clyde
fame)-under other cover names-meet the forces of society
on the racetrack of life. T.M.K.
Corner State & Liberty Streets
"Always The Finest in
Screen Entertainment"
Program Information 662-6264 Shows at 1:15-3-5-7-9 p.m.
"A ROARING VISUAL DELIGHT"
-L.A. TIMES
"A REAL THRILLER" "A MUST"
-UPI -PLAYBOY
ROS4RT R4DFORD ~ iCNA4L J.POLLARD
"LITTLE FAUSS & BIG HALSY"

s

-Associated Press
is sworn into her third term of
rday.
EAD:
Alley tri*'al
eris verdict
so were shown 20 color slides of
the now uninhabited village of
My Lai, taken 20 months after
the so-called massacre of its un-
resisting inhabitants.
Earlier, the jury took an extend-
ed luncheon break so one of its
members, Maj. Harvey Brown,
could receive renewed precaution-
ary treatment for a minor ail-
ment which 'sent him to a hospital
during the night.

governments.
The Cordoban strike, which is in
its second day, seemed completely
effective. Public transport, tele-
communications and other serv-
ices, as well as business, were at
a standstill.
Argentine President Roberto Le-
vingston, who faces serious econ-
omic problems and growing criti-
cism from both left and right, met
for three hours Wednesday night
with the country's top military
leaders, including the commander
in chief, Gen. Alejandro Lanusse.
Lanusse has in the past few
days indicated he favors a much
quicker return to constitutional
government than Levingston, who
is on record as favoring a delay
of four to five years.
But in Britain, as vast areas lay
silent under a one-day demonstra-

Abortion
ref ormers
seek ballot
LANSING (P) - Backers of
Michigan's abortion law reklorm
bill say they are prepared to make
it a ballot issue if there is no ac-
tion in the House of Representa-
tives.
The measure already has passed
the Senate by a narrow 20-17
vote, but proponents now fear it
may be bottled up in a House com-
mittee.

tion, the powerful 7
Congress disowned t
by voting strongly a
strike action.

FOUR WITNESSES attacked provisions in a bill spon-
sored by pollution subcommittee Chairman Edmund Muskie (D-
Maine) yesterday and another measure backed by the Nixon
administration.
Appearing before Muskie's subcommittee as a group representing
Environmental Action, Inc., Zero Population Growth, Inc., Friends
of the Earth, and the Sierra Club, the witnesses urged more clean-
up action under the 1899 Refuse Act.
The Act, which they see as granting broad powers to crackI
down on industrial polluters, empowers the Army Corps of Engineers
to regulate the pollution which is dumped into navigable waters.
e *
THE FBI is making excellent progress in its investigation
of the recent Capitol bombing but is not yet ready to make any
arrests, a Congressional source reported yesterday.
The source said J. Edgar Hoover's, discussion before a House
appropriations subcommittee Wednesday "would bear out" a report
in the Washington Daily News yesterday that the FBI is about
ready to seek indictments against three to five people.

of 3U vietnamese civilians iea
along a trail in My Lai. Calley
denies these slayings.
These were the first victims at-
tributed to Calley and GIs under
his command. In a second charge,
he is accused of directing the mass
' execution of at least 70 others in
a drainage ditch outside the vil-1
lage, and with two ensuing slay-'
ings of individuals.
In his instructions, the judge,
Col. Reid Kennedy, suggested to
the jury that they dispose of the'
first count in the indictment be-
fore proceeding to the second and
so forth.
Their resuest for testimony
about the charge of 30 killings
thus may mean they are still de-
liberating on that charge.
{ At their request, the jurors al-

Ofcrrermnfor My Lai involveni

WASHINGTON (P) - Gen.
William C. Westmoreland has
recommended that Maj. Gen.
Samuel W. Koster and the gen-
eral who was his assistant in
command of the Army division
involved in the My Lai massacre
be demoted and reprimanded,
Pentagon sources said yesterday.
Koster, 51, a n d Brig. Gen.
George H. Young Jr., 50, were
told in a letter from the Army's
general counsel that Westmore-
land, the chief of staff, recom-
mended Koster be reduced in

rank to brigadierg
Young to colonel.
The final decision
ministrative action,
nonjudicial punishm
made by Secretaryo
Stanley R. Resor af
generals are given
reply to the charge
The A r my in J
missed criminal cha
Koster, charges accu
covering up t h er
more than 100 Viet
ilians at My Lai

Trade Union Dr. Jack Stack, chairman of the
he militants Michigan Coordinating Committee
gainst s u c h for Abortion Law Reform, said
Wednesday if House members are
unable or unwilling to vote on the
issue this year "there is growing
-lsupport for a petition drive" to
put the issue on the 1972 general
election ballot.
tent Rep. Richard Allen (R-Ithaca)
main supporter of the bill in the
House, said he would much pre-
general and fer passage through the legisla-
tive process.
for this ad- Allen said he still hopes the
a form of bill will be reported out of the
vent, will be House Social Services and Correc-
of the Army tions Committee, although he cal-
fter the two culated committee members a r e
a chance to 6-3 in opposition.
es. Allen and Sen. Gilbert Bursley
anuary dis- (R-Ann Arbor), sponsor of the
,rges against measure in the Senate, agreed
using him of they will wait until late April or
massacre of early May before deciding wheth-
namese civ- er to try to put the issue on the
ballot.

I

1

Eureka!! The University Cellar is still

11

m

m

14

I- -

illy

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Eur1ka1 The University Cellar is shill
the
(if it were any bigge
FIFTEEN I
ON ALLI
(not just the fu
Some ideas to Som

er we'd have to sell tickets)
PERCENT OFF
NEW BOOKS
n books . . . text too!)
ne people to

SALE

having their great sale of the century. Don't miss

CONTEMPORARY DIRECTIONS
Presents
THE SONIC ARTS UNION
"Turn of the Road 1970"
ROBERT ASHLEY
DAVID BEHRMAN
ALVIN LUCIER
GORDON MUMMA

DOUBLE FEATURE-ENDS TODAY
Ig
......
"A remarkably pertinent, unpre-
tentious film that creeps up on its
f terrifying climax with near-come-
dic easel Deeply affecting in its
understanding of simple men thrust
into the insanity of our blood-
LYNN REDGRAVE lusting time."-Judith Crist.
HYWEL BENNETT "HIGHLY EFFECTIVE,
MEMORABLY INTELLIGENTI"
NIGEL DAVENPORT -William Wolfe, CUE
COLOR ~ J_______ ______
ALSO SHOW TIMES:
"Barbarella"-7:1 5
MUM S P1pftsAlNO E"N POCIon "SNEAK PREVIEW"-9:00,
1 s s "Virgin Soldiers"-1 1 :00

read about
Astrology
Backpacking
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Macrobiotics
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think about
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Brautigan
Junge
Pevls
Pynchon
Tolkien

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