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March 12, 1971 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-12

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Page fight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, March 12, 1971 AW

-ag - -H- MICHIG NIDAILYIF idayIMar h 12,I197

FRED NEIL
REG. 3.25
2"99
JEREMY STEIG
REG. 3.25
2'99
ON CAPITOL
MARK . ALMOND
REG. 3.95
3 49
MASON & ELLIOTT
REG. 3.95
3 49
ON BLUE THUMB
GREASE BAND

RECORD
SALE,
NEW RELEASES
.................

SCORE IN SOUTH:
Racketmen show

promise

By JIM McFERSON
Michigan's tennis team went
down South over spring break to
tangle with some of the top teams
in Dixie, but ran into enough rain
to spoil three matches and under-
cut the overall success of the trip.
The purpose of the annual spring
trip this year through Georgia, and
North and South Carolina, is to get
good competition and good weath-
er, according to Coach Brian Eis-
ner.
At least the netters got a whop-
ping dose of Southern competition
though the weather nearly fouled
the purpose of the trip.
Downpours forced two matches
either indoors or outside on hard-
courts and cancelled one outright.
Not until the final two days -vas the
team able to play competitively on
the hosts' crushed shale'courts.
Those courts were one big reason
why the trip was mapped through
the still hostile regions of the At-

lantic Seaboard. This year's Big
Ten Conference tournament will be
held at Northwestern-a school
unique for its athletic ineptitude,
and crushed shale courts.
Since the Big Ten tourney counts
one-half in determining the winner
of the conference crown (dual
meet results comprising the other
half), Coach Eisner hoped to get
in a full week of competition on the
courts so the team would find the
transition from the Midwest's usual
composition courts to Northwest-
ern's crushed shale oddity a little
easier. "
"We were only half successful,"
said Eisner, "because ou, break
was so early and because of the
rain, some of the schools weren't
able to get their courts in shape,
so we got only half our matches
on the crushed shale surface."
The other half of the time,
though, appeared to please the
coach. "Most of our players came
on very strong," he said. "The
doubles teams came around and all
the men showed their usual enthu-
siasm and ability to work and im-
prove."
After two days of practice in At-
lanta, the team bopped up to Clin-
ton, S.C. and beat the tough little
Presbyterian College, a school
that's taken third in the NAIA na-

tionals two years in a row and in
Eisner's estimation the South's
second best team. The score wasi
5-4.
After stopping over at Davidson,
where they were rained out, the
racketmen trekked up to Durham,
N.C. and blasted Duke 9-0 in a
match rained out and rescheduled
on a practice day.
Yet the team had still not played
competitively on a crushed snale
surface until they steamed into
Chapel Hill, N.C. for a pair of
matches with the University of
North Carolina, a team with six
nationally ranked players and the
best in the South.
With an audience of over 1500
partisans cheering as if they were
at a Poco concert, the Tar Heels
battled to victories on Friday and
Saturday, 7-2 and 8-1, respectively.
Coach Eisner was not apologetic.
"We have no excuse he said,
"they're a fine team, the one we
wanted to play."
Playing against a team with
years of experience on cne crushed
shale type court with each player
accustomed to its slow surface and
treacherous footing, Michigan did
well.
Five losses were played to three
sets and might have gone the other
way. Had the matches been played

on hardcourt, the results probably
would have been reversed.
"The team wasn't depressed
about losing," said Eisner, "we
came away knowing we're playing
better on that surface."
Individually there were three
standouts. Sophomore Dick Ravre-
by, playing number one, though he
was recently pushed back into the
number two position by Junior Joel
Ross, showed his stuff in a match
with Fred McNair, who beat both
Gene Scott and Roscoe Tanner this
summer.
Freshman Kevin Senich, playing
fifth, provided Michigan's only
singles win over North Carolina
and Sophomore Tim Ott, playing
third, came close to taking a pair 0
from the Tar Heels.
"All in all, it was very positive,"
said Eisner. "We still have a long
way to go, a lot of loose ends and
a good deal of individual work
necessary, but the trade mark of
this team has been its willingness
to work and improve."
So the newly tanned tennis team
continues to work out in the Intra-
mural building, waiting for that
chimerical Ann Arbor Spring and
preparing for their next match at
the Irish Invitational, March 26 in
South Bend, Indiana.

2 99

For the student body:
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Slim Fits .....$6.98
(All Colors)
Bells .........$8.50
DENIM

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Neumann paces scorers

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CHECKMATE]
State Street at Liberty

NEW YORK (A') - Austin Carr
has canned more points but John-
ny Neumann has hit them at a
better clip. So "Johnny Reb" of
Mississippi's Rebels has all but
locked up basketball's scoring
championship, according to statis-
tics released yesterday by National
Collegiate Sports Services.
Through March 9, in 23 games
the 6-foot-6 sophomore has scored
923 points for a 40.1 per game aver-
age-only the third collegian to
finish a regular season scoring bet-
ter than a point"a minute.

REG. 3.95

3 49
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BIG BOOKSALE in PROGRESS
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Carr has scored 976 points, 53
more than Neumann, but they've
been spread over 26 games, giving
the Notre Dame star a 37.5 aver-
age.
He set an NCAA tournament re-
cord a year ago with an incredible
three-game average of 52.7-but
the 6-3 senior would have to sur-
pass even that, averaging 62.7 in
three games this time to catch
Neumann.
Jacksonville giant Artis Gilmore
has all but clinched the rebound
title with a 23.2 average to 20.5
by Kermit Washington of Ameri-
can University and Greg Starrick
of Southern Illinois appears certain
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to take the free throw crown with a
.902 average to .871 by Brown's
Rusty Tyler.
But the field goal championship
is still up for grabs. John Belcher
of Arkansas State leads at .633-
but he's finished for the season.
Dennis Wuycik of North Caro-
lina, booted out of the top spot
after five weeks by Belcher, could 1
regain it and win the crown with
a 14-for-17 performance in this
weekend's Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence tourney.

..g
Neumann
Mississippi 23
Carr
Notre Dame 26
Humes
Idahe St. 24
McGinnis
Indiana 23
McDaniels
W. Ky. 25
B.Inaidi, St.
Peter's N.J. 24
Mengelt
Auburn 26
Phillips
S. Met'dist 26
Brown
Iowa 23
Durrett
LaSalle 20

fg
366
382
287
275
296
260
265
262
265
208

ft pts. avg.
191 923 40.1
212 976 37.5

0

203
152
139
167
208
213
119
137

777
702
731
687
738
737
649
553

32.4
30.5
29.2
28.6
28.4
28.3
28.2
27 1

*4

769-7940

L'f

- _. ,

............ . ..... .

t >

YOU

CARE

WHAT

HAPPE

S

TO

PEOPLE?

Do you care about children? About poverty? About race?
If you do, the School of Education wants you. Join the junior-year pre-student teaching pro-
gram based in the Detroit Western regional school constellation.
MASS MEETING, MARCH 17, 1971, 2-4 P.M., SCHORLING AUDITORIUM, SCHOOL OF EDUCATI

ON

4.

The program is open to both juniors and seniors who have not had Educational Sociology, Education
Psychology, or a methods course (elementary, social studies or English as appropriate). All students
who qualify to pursue a teaching certificate in the School of Education are eligible for the program.
You'll be involved in the classroom! You'll be involved in extracurricular activities and in the very life
of the community!

I

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