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March 11, 1971 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-11

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Thursday, March 11, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAIL A-

Page Seven

Thursday, March 11, 197 ~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY-

Eulogy for a

dismal

hockey season

By TERRI FOUCHEY
Time's "Milestones" will per-
haps include this entry in next
week's issue.
Died. -- The 1970-71 Michi-
'gan hockey team, also known
as the Wolverine leers. March
6, 1971; in East Lansing; of
9-21 brought about by a lin-
gering malady picked up last
December 5 in Colorado
Springs which it was contin-
wally unable to shake. Several
attempts at resuscitation fail-
ed and culminated In worse
relapses. Bright spots includ-
ed second-place finishes in
the Great Lakes and Nichols
Tournaments and a last-gasp
8-7 oyertime victory over the
archrival Michigan State.
Those going on to their just
rewards after the prolonged
suffering are: Captain P a ul1
Gamsby, Brian Slack, M e r 1 e
Falk, Tom Marra, Bill Busch,
and Dave Gubow. ,Those sur-
viving this affliction and com-
ing back for more next year
*are: Bernie Gagnon, Punch
Cartier, Karl Bagnell, Brian
Skinner, Bucky Straub, and
Jerry Lefebvre, among others.
This is perhaps the way the
official, dry summary of the re-
cent hockey season will read.
e fans undoubtedly had oth-
r, more colorful views a n d
surprisingly a synopsis of their
probable observations c o m e s
from Gamsby, the captain who
saw his last season at Michi-
gan become his biggest disap-
pointment. "We (the for-
wards) didn't put the puck in
tie net. The goalie didn't keep
it out of ours, and the defense-
men didn't help much either
way." This synopsis goes along.
with Gamsby's attitude of it be-
ing better to laugh than to cry
when faced with so much to cry
about.
I He approaches his serious
analysis of the disasters of
this season with the same phil-
osophical tone which enables
him to state the above with a.

straight face. Going into t h e
series with Colorado College the
first week in December, the
team was 3-1. 'They dropped
both games to the Tigers and
this evened their record. Gams-
by observes, "It would h a v e
helped if we'd split with Color-
ado. The two losses put us at
;500 and got us down in a hole
we never were able to get out
of. If we could have gotten a
winning streak going we would
have been better off. Once we
started losing, everything seem-
ed to keep going wrong."
They managed to keep up the
.500 pace, splitting with Wis-

qualities somehow didn't jell to
produce to their potential.
Now the so-called excuses and
alibis begin. They disclose that
the players themselves are just
as confused and exasperated as
the fans (and skeptical jour-
nalists) concerning why things
didn't work. They also uncover,
. a group of disappointed young
men, who are glad the night-
mare is over.
IN LIGHT OF THIS, Gams-
by offers another overview, "I
know it's a funny thing to say,
but we really worked hard.
People don't think you're work-

"Paul always works at bringing the team
up at the right moment, but this year the team
didn't respond."
-Gary Connelly, Michigan icer
{,t '"r":W&ate#s%:+<4y {:+i^",.r.!'"+,.:..,,t,'.r.} {:'; r, :r"'r M ;y EA . t:+ " ' s v'f { ' r{{+

consin and in the two tourna-
ments over the holidays. Then
the bubble began to burst. Mich-
igan State eked out two wins by
one goal margins and the worst
was yet to come. A split with
North Dakota, two losses to
Denver, another split, this time
with Minnesota-Duluth a n d
then eight consecutive losses to
Michigan Tech, Wisconsin, No-
tre Dame, and Minnesota, before
beating State. An overtime loss
to State the next night ended
the misery and that was that,
9-21.
This all happened to a team
many picked to have an excel-
lent shot at the WCHA title. On
paper Michigan appeared to
have all the cards. There was
talent in the form of two po-
tentiaf superstars, and consist-
ent, experienced players to back
them up. The lines, defense,
and goal had a year's valuable
experience together for the most
part. However, to the dismay of
many, except opponents, these

ing if you lose, but not work-
ing wasn't why we lost. Some
games everybody would play
their guts out and we'd still lose.
It hurts to see a bunch of guys
like we have lose, because I
know we all did our share."
According -to teammates, one
who consistently played h is
heart out and although contin-
ually frustrated by the results
never let is completely over-
whelm him was Gamsby. As
Gary Connelly notes, "Paul al-
ways works at bringing the team
up at the right moment, but this
year the team didn't respond."
Coach Al Renfrew echoes
this, "Paul made an excellent
captain. With all the adversity
we faced this season, he's kept
the morale of the team as high
as could be expected. He's one
who's never given up."
Karl Bagnell adds, "Before
there's always been sort of
cliques, but its not like that
now. I think-it's sort of because
-© of Paul.'He tries to make every-
one feel they're equal and part
of the team."
One of the prime beneficiaries
of this treatment was Bob Fal-
coner. He comments, "Paul real-

ly held us together. He's defin-
itely kept us a team. He's espec-
ially helped the freshmen. He's
made us feel like one of the
fellows."
Brian Skinner expands on this
comment, "We all respect him
and pay attention to what he's
got to say and the way he plays.
He initiates what's going to
happen, but we have to help it
happen.
"Paul has a great deal of de-
sire. He's so anxious to win that
he'll get frustrated and lose his
temper because he's trying so
hard."
ONE INSTANCE where the
frustration got to Gamsby was
in the first game against Col-
orado. He received a game mis-
conduct and was forced to sit
out the second game. Punch
Cartier describes the effect of
his absence. "Paul's the spirit
of the team. The one g am e
when he was suspended, you
could notice he wasn't there.
Usually Paul's in there trying to
get the guys up. The lockerroom
was so quiet."
Another asset Michigan had
which these assessments b e a r
out was a captain who really
was the leader he was expected
to be. Gamsby, however,, does
not feel he did more than oth-
ers. "I didn't really try to do
anything special, any more than
anyone else. We don't like to
lose, and we did get tense, but
I don't think it was as bad as
some teams get when they're
losing. The guys on this team
are the best of any team I've
ever been on and the fact that
we all got along made it a
little easier to take.
"I hate to lose in anything, so
I just try to keep the g u y s
loose. If a guy's having an off
night, I just tell him to for-
get it and start over, since every
period is a new game. Everybody
knows you're losing, so there's
no reason to sit and sulk about
it. We knew we were trying our
hardest and things weren't fall-
ing right for us, and just be-
cause you're losing doesn't mean
something can't be fun."

Gamsby then presents his
opinion as to what went wrong.
"I don't think anybody on the
team can really answer that
question, but we had our share
of bad breaks and made our
share of mistakes.
"Defensive lapses, of all t h e
players, were usually our down-
fall. The defense didn't play
any worse than the forwards
and the forwards could h a v e
scored more. There was a lit-
tle lapse somewhere along t h e
line, usually a few minutes in
the third period and we were
out of it. Nobody plays 60 min-
utes of hockey; it's a combina-
tion of luck and making the
minutes you play' count. That's
what we didn't do. The other
teams had lapses but we didn't
capitalize on them, whereas they
usually capitalized on ours.
The trying and the tenseness it
brought on probably led to more
mistakes and hastened the
downfall, but as Gamsby notes,
"You don't say 'the hell with it'.
We all like to play and to win
and we kept hoping the tide
would turn. We felt we were
playing well enough to win and
we figured if we kept it up
eventually the tide would turn,
but it never did."
A unanimous consensus of his
teammates votes Gamsby as the
most consistent player, the only
one to give 100 per cent each
game. Gagnon expresses the
prevailing sentiment, "P a u1
has a temper, but he doesn't re-
taliate as often after getting
n'

hit. He knows he's more val-
uable on the ice. It's too bad we
didn't have a winner for his
last year."
GAMSBY doesn't quite agree
with his teammates who feel
they've let him down. "We let
each other down. Nobody likes
to lose and we all feel just as
bad."
He continues, "I think the
team played as hard as we
could, win or lose. It was a team
effort when we lost and a team
effort when we won."
Gamsby feels that the team
next year has a good chance
and points to Minnesota tw o
years ago. "They went f r o m
last to first place in one season.
I think we have a chance to do
it."
$650.00/SIX WEEKS
SUMMER STUDY IN
SOUTHERN FRANCE
July 5-August 14, 1971
* French Elementary, Interme-
diate, and Advanced Levels
CrEarn up to 6 University
Credits
* Information: Study Abroad
Office (Miss Apple): 764-0310
or come to 1223 Angell Hall
0 Application Deadline: March
31, 1971

ALL PHOTOGRAPHERS
Yearbook Photo Heeling
1:00 p.m. Wednesday
March I11
Please bring examples
and/or portfolios
Questions? Call Randy Edmonds
663-6177 (5-6 p.m.)
1st floor-'Ensign
Student Publications. Bldg..
Read and Use Daily Classifieds

New From Levi!
For the Student Body:
Boot Jeans
$1.50

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Joel

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Journey South gives
Stickmen experience

National Secretary of International Socialists
AND SPECIALIST IN E. EUROPEAN AFFAIRS
will analyze the workers' movement in
POLAND, 1971
8:00 P.M. THURSDAY, MARCH 11I

-

- 5 U

I

PRE-SH RUNK

By BIL)L ALTERMAN
rhirty-two weary men' of Michi-
gan's Lacrosse squad returned to
Ann Arbor Sunday after an ex-
hausting spring break. In eight
days they had traveled 1800 miles
'nd played in four games, winning
only one.
,put coach Bob ,Kaman seemed
s isfied: "The trip was an ambi-
tious undertaking by a club team
and though we were only 1-3 for
the practice games we played, I
feel that the experience gained by
playing some of the best teams in
the South will strengthen our team
for the upcoming Midwest season."
e Wolverines got off on the
right track with a 10-3 victory over
Virginia Tech on Monday, March
1. Last year Tech downed Michi-
gan 4-2 and Kaman admitted "We
allowed them to dominate us phys-
ically. This year we played our
own kind of game, jumped to a 5-1
l d and won going away."
On Wednesday the sticknien
journeyed to Roanoke College and
found they had to put up with the
kind of conditions usually found in
those long-ago pre-tartan turf days.
The field was such that every
aund ball stuck in the mud and
was awarded to the opposing team.
Nevertheless, Kaman w a s
pleased with his team's perform-
ance. "Last year Roanoke beat us
14-7 due to their ability to capita-
lize on our penalties. This year, we
avoided penalties and played them
e n." The Wolverines lost 8-6.
It was a costly matchup for the
Wolverines, however, as they lost
for three weeks the services of
crease defenseman Dave Fischer
who suffered a dislocated shoulder.
Saturday Michigan was in Chapel
to face North Carolina, the seventh
r ed team in the nation last
ye r. And although on the short
end of -a 9-7 count, K~aman di'd
not fault the team, "We found that
we could play even with the best
in the country, but were hurt due
to lack of depth. We ran two mid-
fields against the Tarheel's five
b ran out of steam. Though we
tot that .game, we felt that 'we
were rapidly becoming a solid la-
crosse team."

The next morning Michigan took
on Duke and, according to Kaman,
"the weeks' games and travel
caught up with Michigan."
Michigan jumped off to a 2-1 lead
but was unable to keep the pace up
and went down 10-7.
The trip did point up several
weaknesses in the Michigan for-
mat, particularly on faceoffs,
ground balls and clearing. Kaman
also hopes to get a third midline
centered around Skip Flanagan into
action.
Midfielder Dick Dean earned
special praise from Kaman. "He
was by far the standout on offense
scoring at least two goals in every
game."

DeLong's Pit Barbecue
FEATURES THESE DINNERS:

Bar-B-Q Ribs
Bar-B-Q Chicken
Bar-B-Q Beef
Bar-B-Q Pork

CHECKMATE
State. Street at Liberty

3540 S.A.B.

Shrimp
Scallops
Fried Chicken
Fried Fish

ALL INVITED

11

I

Fried Oysters
All Dinners Include Fries, Slaw, and Bread
CARRY OUT FREE DELIVERY
OPEN: Mon., Wed., Thurs., Sun.-1 1 a.m. to 2 a.m.
Fri., Sat.-11 a.m. to 3 a.m.

OPE

HEARINGS

0N

314 Detroit St.

665-2266

k
l I'"

DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING STUDENT COUNCIL
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY OF ART
DEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
and
INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
PRESENT
THEMEANING OF AR.OLOGY: a slide lecture
BY
PAOLO SOLERI

+ ,. ^ 1;...

HOUIN

The Housing Policy Board has passed a proposal for the University to build
1000 units of apartment housing. The housing would be funded by HUD at
no cost to the University.

I

Proposed features of the Housing:

I

THURSDAY, MARCH 11, 1971

-11 ,1111 -

t RACKHAM LECTURE HALL

8:00 P.M.

L

,o.comin .3
S.O.S.
DAYS

TONIGHT
Film Benefit for the Detroit Sixteen,
"STAGOLEE"
Bobby Seale, Chairman of the Mlack Panther Party speaks from jail
of his life in prison and his vision for the development of his people
and a just society
AND
"DAVID HILLIARD on Face the Nation"
A complete version of CBS' Face the Nation televised December 28,
1969. David Hilliard, Black Panther Party Chief of Staff, deftly con-
founds his interviewer's attempts to discredit the BPP with slanted
questions on violence, revolution and ideology.

* 1000 units by Fall, 1975-
9 250 units by Fall, 1972.
" Located just north of Huron High School.
* Lease-3 year lease with 60 day notice for
termination at any time.
Open to all University students and employees
includes Community Center and Child Care Facilities
Efficiency $80i l
~1 Bedroom $110
2 Bedroom $160utilities
3 Bedroom $230

III

If

III

if

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