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March 11, 1971 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-11

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, March 11, 1971

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, March 11, 1971

I'

I

ADVISORY GROUP
Committee to study 'U' budget

(Continued from Page 1)
dent and faculty groups, who de-
manded increased representat-
tion for their constituencies.
Soon after, the commission
was reordered to contain four
faculty members, four students,
two executive officers and two
members of the Academic Af-
fairs Advisory Council, which
consists of the deans of the Uni-
versity's 17 schools and colleges
and the directors of the various
institutes.
This settlement, however, did
not satisfy Student Government

jI

7

Council (SGC). President Robben
Fleming was to receive from
SGC a list of student nominees
from which he was to select four
students to fill the posts.
SGC refused to submit the list,
maintaining that four students
would not provide the proper
representation of the student
community and that, in any
event, it should be able to 'ap-
point the four students outright.
SGC President Marty Scott
said last night, however, that due
to the urgency of the University's
present budget problem SGC will
shortly submit the list of names
to President Fleming for approv-
al.
Present commission members
include Smith and Pierpont,
Deans Alfred. Sussman (LSA) and
Gorden Van Wylen (Engineer-
ing) and faculty members medi-
cal Prof. Theodore Meadows, his-
tory Prof. Jacob Price,, social
work Prof. Rosemary Sarri and
economics Prof. Frederic Scher-
er.
The burget problem which has
raised the ire of the entire Uni-
versity community began last
month, when Milliken proposed
a bare $2.8 million increase in
the state's appropriation ,to the
University for the next fiscal
year beginning July 1-a figure
falling drastically short of the
University's $22 million request-
ed increase.

The appropriations request pre-
sents a severe financial dilemma
for the University. With a state
austerity cut of 1.75 per cent
from the University's $69 million
allocation for the current fiscal
year, University officials were,
counting on a sizeable increase
to offset current economy mea-
sures.
Milliken's appropriations re-
quest is presently being consid-
ered by the Legislature in con-
text with the entire state bud-
get. It will probably be approved
sometime in April, .-and, if the
past several years are any indi-
cation, the Legislature will in
fact cut the governor's education
appropriations.
Thus, the $2.8 million increase
effectively represents the maxi-
mum which the University could
receive from the state-and it
could well be much less.
Althougn it is not yet clear just
how much clout the commission
will have in budgetary matters,
most of the members rope that
its eventual role will be signifi-
cant, believing that the commis-
sion's task has taken on a "sense
of urgency" because of the pres-
ent budget crisis.
Since it has begun meeting on
a regular basis this term, the
commission has spent most of its
time in a "learning process"
concerning all aspects of the Uni-
versity budget.
-p Presently the commission is
carefully going over the budget
in detail, in order to become ac-
quainted with its workings, Suss-
man says.
At its last meeting, the com-
mission met with representatives
of the Faculty Reform Coalition,
a group of over 200 faculty inem-
bers attempting to increase fac-
ulty influence in University de-
cision-making.
Pierpont, who says the com-
mission has a "real focus of at-
tention" in the present budget
crisis, explains that. it will
"eventually hopefully be getting
involved in actual substantive is-
sues of budget-making."
"I see the long-range contribu-
tion of the commissolon as great-
er than any emergency action
taken between now and July 1,"
says Smith.

Friendly proposes
wire service in U'
By HANNAH MORRISON
Establishment of a nationwide electronic news service
to provide broader television and radio coverage was pro-
posed yesterday by Fred Friendly, former CBS News Presi-
dent, in a speech to 500 people in Rackham Aud.
"My purpose," he said, "is to stimulate a dialogue that
may result in a serious study of a more effective use of the
manpower, equipment and funds now available to broad-
cast news organizations."
Friendly described television coverage as being "over-
exposed and underdeveloped . . . due to an awkward and
often archaic system of news gathering which favors bulk
footage and costly duplication.
He suggested that the electronic new service operate
for television news bureaus as the major wire services now
do for newspapers. "J o i n t coverage of non-competitive
events would free the correspondents and cameramen to
cover the important, not merely the urgent," Friendly said.
He outlined the structure of the proposed news service

TV
talk

I

Fred Friendly

iii*

=,i

coming .. .
SDAYS
HI-Fl BUYS
Ann Arbor--East Lansinq

- a common assignment deski
set up by major news organi-
zations in cities throughout
the nation, utilizing their
combined resources.
Friendly suggested that a pre-
liminary study of his proposal be
financed by several foundations.
The results of the study would be
used by the television networks.
In a press conference preceed-
ing his speech, Friendly mentioned
ways in which newspapers and lo-
cal radio and television stations
might benefit from the news ser-
vice. "Local coverage would im-
prove, if reporters were able to
view the events, as well as receiv-
ing them over the wire," he said.
Friendly was highly critical of
the present handling of televis-
ion news. "It deserves an A for
effort but far less for perform-
ance," he said, blaming the Fed-
eral Communications Commission
and increased cost of air time.
"The problem," he said, "is too
much money and not enough good
programming. Right now, no one
is happy with broadcasting, espec-
ially since it has let people like
Agnew get away with intellectual
murder."
Friendly is now the Edward
Murrow Professor of Journalism
at Columbia University.

4. - .

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN fo0r m to
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices are not accepted for
publication. For more information,
phone 764-9270.
THURSDAY, MARCH 11
Day Calendar
Resonance Lunch Seminar: R. wil-
liams, "Interaction of Pollutants with
Radiation," P&A Colloquium Rm, noon.
Nuclear Colloquium: L. Wolfenstein,
Carnegie-Mellon U., "Mirror Asymmet-
ry in Beta-Decay," P&A Colloq. Rm.,.4
p.m.
Henry Russell Lecture: P. Kauper,
"Government and Religion: the Search
for Absolutes," Rackham Amph., 4 p.m.
History of Art Lecture: P. Mylonas,
Nat'l Academy of Fine Arts, Athens,
Greece, "Painting in the Monasteries
of Mount Athos," Aud. BI, Angell Hall,
4:10 p.m.
Speech Dept. Performance: "George
Washington Crossing the Delaware,"
Arena Theatre, Frieze Bldg., 4:10 p.m.
International Night: Hungary, Mi.
League Cafeteria, 5 p.m.
Scottish Country Dance: Women's
Athletic Bldg., Forest St., Upstairs Gym,
7:30 p.m.

Religious Affairs Seminar: "Sharing
Our Ultimate Concerns," Guild House,
802 Monroe St.. 7:30 p.m.
School of Music: University Concert
Band, J. Reynolds, conductor, Hill Aud.,
8 p.m.
Engineering Coil. - Coll. of A&D Lec-
ture : P. Soleri, architect-planner, "The
Idea of Arcology,". Rackham Lecture
Hall, 8 p.m.
Astronomy and Space Films: NASA
films on Apollo scientific findings about
the Moon and the 1989 Mariner M a r s
flights; "Universe;" first still photo-
graphs from Apollo 14, E. Quad Aud.,
9 p.m.
Placement
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICES
212 S.A.B.
Interviews: for appointments c a ll
764-7460, ask for Summer Placement.
March 11: Distributors of nationally
kcnown products will interview from
1:30-5, literature available. r
March 12: Camp Tamarack, Detroit
Fresh Air Society, openings include ca-
bin counselors, specialist in waterfront,
arts and crafts, nature camperaft, trip-
ping, dramatics, dance, puppetry, unit
and asst. unit. supvrs., caseworker,
nurses, truck-bus driver, cooks assist-
ants.
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
National Park Concessions, appl.
available for these Nat. Parks: M am-
moth Cave, Ky., Big Bend, Tex., "Isle
Royal, Mi., Olympic, Wash., Blue Ridge,
Parkway, Vir.-N.C., deadline Mar. 15.
Cook County, Dept. of Public Aid,
Chicago, Summer trainee program in
soc. wk. for sophs., and jrs.
Kennleth Narrod Moving Co., Chicago,
openings for men; good pay and ad-
vancement for undergrads for future
summers.
Human Resources Ctr., N.Y. Social
Serv. work for grad. and undergrad
students in nursing; occup. and phys.
ther.; psych., public health, rehab;,
educ., rec., soc., and related fields.
Naval Underwater Systems Center,
New London, Conn. Openings for grads
in fields of electrical and mech. engr.,
math., and physics.
Mobil Research and Dev. - Corp.,
Dallas, opening for grad students as
res. assts., in programming', and a
research geologist.
Panomegas Corp., Franklin, Michigan:
Opening for male over 21 for captain of
40 ft. vessel; must be qualified scuba
diver.
Tax-Rite
INCOME TAX SERVICE
109 S. FOURTH AVE.
761-7199
Weekdays 9-8; Sat. 9-5

4a
4

618 S. Main

769-47001

"Quality Sound Through
Quality Equipment"

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EXHIBITION and ALE
of
WATER COLORS,
by
MAULSBY KIMBALL of New York
MICHIGAN LEAGUE, Rooms 4 and 5
Thurs.-Fri., March 11-12-10:30 a.m.-8:00 p.m.
WATER COLOR DEMONSTRATION
"T he Search for the Spiritual in Painting"
Thurs.-Fri., March 11-12-3:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m.
Michigan League, Henderson Room, 3rd Floor
Sponsored by the ANTHROPOSOPHICAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION

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TWA
I NTRODUCES
1/3 OFE

PREGNANT?

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cost $3 and are available
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AND 2YEARS TO PAY.

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airfare, hotels, meals,
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*4

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