100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 23, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ht';

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

T-etc-Ari- in-710 I

9 .___ -_--- - - ----

I utesuy, I-ebruary Z3, 1I*I1

1_

'M' ICERS LATEST VICTIM

Irish tradition continues

By BILL ALTERMAN
If America is the promised
land, then South Bend, Indiana
is the promised city. Whatever
the Fighting Irish attempt they
invariably succeed at, be it foot-
ball, basketball and their latest
endeavor, hockey.
On the gridiron, the Irish have
long had a winning tradition,
grounded in the mold Knute
Rockne formed in the 1920s. This
year's team went 10-1 including a
Cotton Bowl upset over previous-
ly unbeaten number one Texas.
And hardly do the heroics of
Joe Theismann cease than the
image of Austin Carr shadows
the country. Carr, you may re-
call, scored 38 points in the sea-
son's first basketball game to
lead the Irish to a 94-81 shellack-
ing of Michigan.
And only a month ago, the Irish
upset another number one ranked
team, the TJCLA Bruins. UCLA,
too, had been undefeated before
the magic of Notre Dame did
them in.
Alas, even though Michigan's

pucksters are far from undefeat-
ed, the Fighting Irish took little
pity on our lowly state and
burned the Wolverines twice this
past weekend, 4-2 and 5-4.
Notre Dame, of course, is not
in the Western Collegiate Hoc-
key Association and some of the
icers doubtless eased up over the
weekend. Even so, the sweep is
a tribute to the Notre Dame ath-
letic department which in three
short years could, from a stand-
irig start, bring forth a hockey
team of big time caliber.
WCHA Standings

W
xMichigan Tech ....16
Denver ... . . . ... 11
Wisconsin .. ........11
Michigan State ...... 9
Minnesota - Duluth .. 9
North Dakota ....... 9
Colorado ..... .'..... 6
Minnesota ........... 7
MICHIGAN.........4
x-Clinched title

L
1
7
7
9
11
12
9
12
14

T:
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0

Pct.
.941
.611
.611
.500
.450
.429
.400
.368
.222

Time .to moves
UNIVERSITY'
TOWERS- E
is now renting for summer and fall
University Towers
536 South Forest Ave.
761-2680

This year the Irish are 7-11-2
against WCHA competition and
the prospects of Notre Dame
joining the league next yea: are
good.
Irish coach Lefty Smith, who
didn't forsee any problems in
coming into the WCHA, added
"we haven't been blown out of
the rink by any team in the
WCHA so far this year."
Michigan mentor Al Renfrew
also expects to see Notre Dame
in the league but hopes to limit
the league size to ten.
With the construction of the
Athletic and Convocation Center
in South Bend in 1967, the Unive.-
sity upped its club team to var-
sity and, playing against small-
time competition, went 16-8-3.
Last year, against a slightly
tougher schedule, the Fighting
Irish were 21-8-1.
This year, playing a rugged
schedule, Notre Dame is holding
its own with an 11-12-2 mark.
More importantly, the Irish have
a young team with only four
seniors on the 32-man squad.
Meanwhile, t h e Wolverines
continue to have problems as
their overall record slid to 8-18
while their last-place conference
record remained.at 4-14.
But fortunately for Michigan,
the two teams it is closely pur-
suing also had their difficulties.
Minnesota, the Wolverines oppo-
nent this coming weekend, lost a
pair to the improving Wisconsin
Badgers, and Colorado split with
the Spartans at East Lansing.
A series sweep over Minnesota
this weekend and a duplicated
performance the following week
against Michigan State, would
give the Wolverines eighth place
by a mere half-game margin over
the Gophers.
And if Colorado also loses its
last three, Michigan would vault
all the way to seventh, shading
the Tigers by a few percentage
points.

*? ,

AW

I

THE AMAZING PLEASURE BED (0.
announces its GRAND OPENING SALE
Tuesday, Feb. 23at 12:00
Come to Afclotique, 211 S. State (next to Middle
Earth) and lie down on a big (61/2x 71/2), oozy,
delicious, soft, leftime guaranteed, highest qual-
ity available, inexpensive

-Deily-Denny Gainer
RICK MALLETTE (10) charges toward the Notre Dame goal in hopes of receiving a pass from a
teammate during Friday's 4-2 Wolverine loss, as goalie Chris Cathcart and an Irish player watch
the action. The game was Michigan's 1000th in varsity competition and came in the midst of one of
its worst seasons.
S UPREME COUR T:
Haywood seeks injumetioi

WASHINGTON (P) - Profes-
sional basketball star Spencer
Haywood asked the Supreme Court
yesterday to allow him to con-
tinue to play for the Seattle
SuperSonics p e n d i n g litigation
over his status in the National
Basketball Association.
Haywood asked for an injunc-
tion against the U.S. Court of
Appeals in San Francisco or, fail-
ing that, a stay of the Appeals

Water Bed

I

I

I

Michigan's first and Ann Arbor's only
manufacturer of water beds

U'

a

t

WITH MAX SHULMAN
(By the author of Rally Roud the Ftap,,Boys... DobieGiUis... etc.)
ESP; or Extra-Sensory Pollution

Univ. of Michigan in coop
with Interstate Broadcast Network
Presents at
Crisler ArenaJ

Hoope Pickings
The Cottage Inn Greaseria and the Union Ten Pin Lanes join with
the Daily this week in honoring William Cherniak with the first member-
ship ever awarded in the Hoope Pickings Hall of Fame.
Cherniak, or Clarivoyant Bill as the gnomes around here call him,
has won the contest for the second week in a row, which is not so fan-
tastic when you consider the kind of opposition he faces among our
readers.
Still, Cherniak's feat so astounded us that we decided to suspend
Hoope Pickings for a week, especially since we're not going to be here
next week to figure out the winners. Happy vacation, and practice your
picking!

Court's order clearing the way for
NBA action against him.
A U.S. District Court in Los
Angeles on Feb. 2 barred the NBA
from taking action against Seattle
to stop Haywood from playing,
pending trial of the case scheduled
to start March 2. The Appeals
Court stayed the lower court order
Feb. 16.
Haywood said if relief is not
granted he will suffer irreparable
injury to his physical condition.
playing ability and reputation "as
a super star." He said denial of his
petition would have the effect of
keeping him out of play the rest
of this season.
The former University of Detroit
athlete dropped out of college af-
ter his sophomore year, 1968-69,
to play for Denver in the American
Basketball Association. Late in
1970, after he became 21. Haywood
rescinded the contract, complain-
iing of fraud and misrepresenta-
tion. Last Dec. 28 he contracted
with Seattle of the NBA at a six-
year salary of $1.5 million.
The NBA has a rule that no

N H L
East Division
W L T Pts. GF GA
Boston 41 10 7 89 282 153
New York 36 14 10 82 190 138
Montreal 29 17 11 69 208 157
Toronto 31 25 4 66 209 170
Detroit 18 32 8 44 163 219
LBu11alo 16 33 11 43 156 228
Vancouver 18 34 5 41 157 210
West Division
Chicago 39 15 6 84 221 147
St. Louis 25 18 15 65 159 149
Philadelphia 22 27 10 54 158 174
Minnesota 20 27 13 53 145 180
Pi tstsburh 19 27 14 52 171 175
Los Angeles 17 29 11 45 169 220
California 17 40 3 37 147 218
Yesterday's Results
Montreal. at Vancouver, inc.
Only game scheduled.
Today's Games
Boston at Buffalo
only game scheduled.
ABnA,'

player can be hired until four y
years after he graduates from high
school. This won't be until June
for Haywood. The NBA also says
players can be hired only through
the college draft, and there is no
certainty that Seattle would get
Haywood in a draft.
Pro Standings

Physicists tell us there are three basic forces at work in the uni-
verse: matter, energy and chopped liver.
But I, for one, am no longer satisfied with this narrow definition.
How do physicists classify ESP? Certainly it falls into none of these
categories, but just as certainly it exists. And not as a mere theory; ESP
is a proven, demonstrated fact.
For example, how many times have you walked into a place you
never saw before and yet recognized everything? How many times have
you known the exact words someone was going to say before he ever
said them? How many times have you been absolutely certain some-
thing was going to happen hundreds or even thousands of miles away
and, sure enough, it did?
Let me tell you about a case I am fortunately able to document.
Some years ago I went fishing with my dear friend Donald L. Fromkiss
at a virgin lake deep in the Canadian wilds. It was hellishly difficult to
get there, but we did not mind, for the moment we dropped our lines
we each caught a splendid crappie. Mine weighed just over 300 pounds.
Donald's was somewhat smaller, but by far the friendlier.
Imagine my surprise then when, before we could throw our lines
back for another try, Donale suddenly leaped up and cried he'd had a
premonition that he must go home immediately. He could not tell me
why. He only knew that some one or some thing was calling him back
and he had to go at once. Apologizing profusely, he left me alone on
the lake and portaged to the nearest town (Moose Jaw, well over a
thousand miles, and poison sumac every inch), and there he chartered
a Ford Tri-Motor and flew home.
Well sir, at first he felt like an utter dolt. Everything was perfectly
normal at home. His wife Edith was quietly reading The Sensuous
Woman. His son Herschel was taking his daily glassblowing lesson.
His dog Trey was eating his leash.
And yet the premonition would not leave Donald. Carefully, he
went through the house, inch by inch, room by room. Sure enough,
when he got to the back hall he suddenly heard a faint whimpering
noise outside. He flang open the door. And there, by George, he saw
where the whimpering was coming from: someone had left a basket on
the back stoop!
Well sir, who can blame Donald for crying a cry of joy and tri-
umph? What a find! A whimpering basket! That's something you don't
see every day, let me tell you!
And so today, as you know of course, Donald L. Fromkiss and
His Whimpering Basket is one of the highest paid acts in show busi-
ness. Next Sunday, in fact, he completes his 84th consecutive year on
Ed Sullivan.

4

I

I i i i i 7 i i i 7 i i i * i / 7 i i t i r I

I

'-7

Monday, March 8th
DIRECT FROM RINGSIDE
MADISON SQUARE GARDEN, N.Y.C.
UNDEFEATED
MUHAMAAD ALI
CASSIUS CLA':
-S N
JOE FRAZIER
WORLD'S CHAMPION
Exclusively on Closed Circuit T'
in Color

~~. I

U. of M. Skiers-This Spring Break
SKI SCHUSS MOUNTAIN
Escape from Reality-Feb. 28-Mar. 4, 1971

East Division
W L
Virginia 44 21
Kentucky 35 31
New York 31 35
Carolina 28 37
Floridians 28 40
Pittsburgh 27 39
" West Division
Utah 44 20
Indiana 41 21
Memhis 36 29
Denver 23 40
Texas20 4

Pet.
.677
.530
.470
.431
.412
.409
.688
.661
.554
.365
.313

GB
9q2
13'y
16
17 .
17
2
8
20f
24

TRIP
INCLUDES:

Transportation

FACILITIES:

IV "

Rooms (Schuss Mt. Lodge) Ski activities
Four day lift tickets Heated outdoor
Three fabulous dinners swimming pool
Access to all facilities Game room
Exclusive lobby area
Romantic sleigh rides
Nightly apres
For further information contact:
763-0600 or 487-3523
For four days total cost $64.00 per person

*
'V

Vesterday's Results
Indiana at Memphis, ine.
Only game scheduled.

Buy Now! Don't get KO'D
Prices $12.00, $6.00 Student
ALL SEATS RESERVED

TICKETS NOW ON SALE
AT U OF M TICKET OFFICE

SKI THE KINGDOM OF SCHUSS MOUNTAIN

1'

EMEMMMMMMMMM9

c
Cc)

As for me, I too was a beneficiary of Donald's ESP, for when he
left me alone on the lake I figured I would get to drink all-not just
half-of the goodly supply of Miller High Life Beer we had brought
along, and as you know of course, Miller High Life is never so welcome
as it is on a tranquil sylvan lake while a flock of Canada geese darkens
the sky above. Of course, Miller isn't bad in a noisy bar either while a
flock of American coeds darkens the jukebox. For that matter, it's even
great in the dorm while your cruddy roommate darkens the tub.
But as it happened, I never did get to drink all our Miller High
Life because I forgot how well sound travels across a sylvan lake. No
sooner did I pop my first can of Miller when-lo and behold!-ten
Mounties galloped out of the forest singing selections from Rose Marie!

v:::. .::::::.. _ ... ... .:. ::::::. :.:-.:::.: :::.:::::::::::.:.: :::::.::::........ .:: ..... ... ...... .. ..::.:... v, .h. ... .... .. .......: ::., :.:
.. .. :..:: is .. ... .....::::. ::. : i::.i'......... ::. , .,.... ....,....... .................... ?.
...... ... .... .... ....... .... ......... ... .. ...... ..... ... ..... .... ... ................s . .. x ,................. ....................:::::. :....:::...:... t.
.. ...... .. ... ........ ... ...... .: ........ ...... ....1 .. ,,.............
.. ...._.. .. .. .. .:. ..... ... ...... .. .., v ...... ........ .......... .. .. .. ... .. nom......... ...... %i' ; :%}^r' i:ti {::i-:i i' :ti i ::::::i ::':: .:
.... ........ ........................... .. .. ........... ............ ....... ...:::. :: J.:v'i.:
.............. ::::. v' .... .................... .: ::.:'.::.::isi.i::.iiii::= i::-::.i: .:.:.}::%::}i:.:-.... . , r,.,.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan