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February 17, 1971 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-17

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, February 7, 197

Regents
change
judic plan
(Continued from Page 1)
-An alteration in the procedure
for selection of the members of the
judicial system's court of appeals,
the presiding judge, and a com-
plaint referee who would adminis-
ter the system. Under the commit-
tee's plan, the appointments to
these posts would be approved by
SGC, Senate Assembly, and the
Regents. Under the regental. draft,
SGC and Senate Assembly would
nominate a slate of candidates
equal to double the vacancies, from
which the Regents would make the
actual appointment.

dormsDAILY OFFICIAL

to boycott
lettuce
(Continued from Page 1)
in West Quad to discuss the rec-
ommendations of the Rates Com-
mittee regarding next year's dorm
contract rates.
The board hopes to approve the
committee's recommendations in
time for them to be considered at
the Regents meeting on Friday.
The Rates Committee presented
the possibility that they may be
able then to recommend a some-
what smaller increase than the
$137 already proposed.
The matter of additional student
housing was discussed, but con-
troversy over the best site for the
proposed low-cost housing units
prevented the endorsement of a
number of recommendations made
by the ad hoc housing board, a
student subcommittee of the policy
board.
All board members agreed that
construction of a large number of
apartment units was an urgent
need. However, ecological objec-
tions were raised to two specifical-
ly proposed sites for the construc-
tion, the former Residential Col-
lege site in the Huron River Val-
ley and part of the golf course at
Stadium and Main St.

-Associated Press
Army war dissenter
Lt. Locis Font of Kansas City, Mo., announces his request to a
military court to ban alleged restrictions on his freedom of speech.
Font, a Vietnam war dissenter, claims that the charges against
him result from his public exposure of conditions at Ft. Meade, Md.
PETITION CIRCULATED:
~Free Angela Davis'
crr~n htllv miphnl

I:UJL L :III :
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be -
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before
2 p.m., +f the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear enly once. Student organiza-
tion notices are not accepted for
publication. For more information,
phone 764-9270.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17
Day Calendar
Anatomy Seminar: Dr. J. Lillie, "Some
Effects of Prostaglandin E, on the
Normal and Isoproterexol-Stimulated
Parotid Gland," 4804 Med. Sci, II, 1:10
p.m.
Social Work Film: "I Am Juaquin,"'
2065 Frieze Bldg., 2 p.m.
Botany Seminar: Dr. D. Fox, Cran-
brook, "Carotenoid Pigments in Plant
and Animal Metabolism," 1400 Chem.
Bldg., 4 p.m.
Joint Colloquium with Wayne St.
Univ.: E. Montroll, U. of Rochester,
"Quantitative Aspects of Social Phe-
nomena" Rm 170 P&A Bldg., 4 p.m.
LBaha'i Fireside: Baha'i faith Informa-
tional mtg., Mosher Hall Lounge, 7:30
P.m.
Chemical Engineering Lecture: B.
Carnahan, t"The IBM 360/67 Computing3
System and MTS," Nat. Set. Aud., 7:30j
p.m.
School of Music: Univ. Symphony, De-
bussy's Festivals: Morgenstern's "La-
ment for Ignacio"; Haydn's "SymphonyI
in G," Hill Aud., 8 p.m.I
University Players: "The Devils,"
Trueblood, 8 p.m.
Musket: "My Fair Lady," Lydia Men-
delssohn, 8 p.m.
General Notices
Alliance Francaise d'A n n A r b o r
and Romance Languages Illustrated
Lecture (in French): J. Prinet, Paris,
"Le Bibliotheque Nationale; son role,"
E. Conf. Rm., Rackham, 4 p.m.
Foreign Visitors
Following persons can be r e a c h e d
through Foreign Visitor Div., Rms. 22-j
24, Mi: Union, 764-2148: A. Dekanov ic,
Yugoslavia, Feb. 17-21; A. Mori, Tokyo,
Japan, Feb. 22-23.
r'--
Placement
3200 S.A.B.
Further information about following
announcements can be obtained from
Career Planning, 3200 S.A.B.:
AFS Committee, Summer Service
- Abroad, positions in Latin Amer., Cuba,
1 Europe, Middle East, Africa, Soviet Un-{
ion.
Pratt Inst., graduate program inj
creative packaging, fellowships avail-'
S able.
0
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 S.A.B.
e Please direct questions about the
following announcements to SPS, 212
SS.A.B., phone: 764-7460, ask for Sum-
mer Placement. Appts. may be made
S by phone or in person:
- FEB. 18:
Detroit Edison, Detroit. Openings for
and control, engineering field of res.,
devel., design production, and sales;
S also biology.
-FEB. 20:
sCamp Lenni-Len-A-Pe, N.Y. coed, in-
terview Sat. from 9-5, rm. 3616 S.A.B.,
tennis, golf, ham radio, and electron-

ics, sailing, canoeing, skiing, tripping,
athletics, arts and crafts, riflery.
Camp Mataponi, Maine, girls. Inter-
view from 10 to 3, rm. 3524 S.A.B.,
openings for waterfront, landsports,
drama. Must be 20 or over.
Good Humor Co., Detroit. Interview-
ing from 9 to 5; good paying jobs;
openings in other cities.
B.E.S.T.S., Chicago, N.Y., interview
from 1:30-4:30. Now is your chance for
first-hand info on jobs anywhere in
Europe; details at SPS.
* * * *
SUMMARY OF ACTION TAKEN BY
STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL
AT ITS MEETING
FEBRUARY 10, 1971
Appointed: Marty Scott and Rebec-
ca Schenk to attend the Inter-Govern-
mental Symposium to be held on
February 20, 1971.
Approved: That Friends of Edge
City be recognized as a student or-
ganization.
Approved: That MATURE (Mature
Adults Trying Urgently to Receive
Equality) be recognized as a student
organization.
Defeated: That SGC allocate $30 to
Zero Population Growth. Roll call vote:
Yes: Ackerman, Lewin. No: De Grieck,
Heyn, Hunt, Oesterle, Schenk, Spears,
Teich, Thee. Abstained: Lessem.
Approved: That SOC allocate up to
$250 for advertising purposes for stu-
dent registration drive. Roll Call vote:
Yes: Ackerman, De Grieck, Heyn, Hunt,
Lessem, Lewin, Oesterle, Schenk,
Spears, Teich, Thee.
That Jerry De Grieck, Andre Hunt
and Larry Deitch be in charge of the
advertising campaign.
Defeated: That SGC allocate $250 to
the Radical Independent Party. Roll
'Call vote: Yes: De Grieck, Teyn, Les-
sem, Schenk, Spears, Teich. No: Acker-
man, Lewin, Oesterle, 'Thee. Abstained:
Hunt. (Defeated for lack of two-thirds
in favor).
Approved: WHEREAS : A loan of $250
from SGC to Student Mobilization
Committee repayable on or before Jan-
uary 31, 1971 is as yet unpaid; ' and
WHEREAS:SMC has a long overdue
bill from SGC of $53.50 unpaid; MOVE:
That SMC be requested to pay such
amounts due ($303.50) in monthly in-
stallments on or before the first day
of each month, beginning March 1, 1971,
with no installment to be less than
$50.00 except for the final payment.
FURTHER MOVE: That unless the loan
is repaid under the above conditions,
SMC's office privileges will be, with-
drawn. ROLL CALL VOTE: YES: Heyn,
Hunt, Lewin, Oesterle, Schenk, Spears
NO: De Grieck, Lessem, Thee. AB-
STAINED: Teich.
Approved: WHEREAS: For too long
students have served in a secondary
role and an advisory capacity in de-
cision-makingdat the University;
WHEREAS: Institutional decisions of
all kinds should reflect the will of all
members of the University community;
WHEREAS: With the establishment of
the Policy 'oard in the Office of Stu-
dent Services and the Academic Serv-
ice Policy Committee working with
Vice President Spurr, SGC has begun
a precedent of a more meaningful stu-
dent's decision making within the of-
fices of the University's Vice-Presi-
dents; RESOLVED: That SGC will no
longer appoint students to serve on
purely advisory committee to the
Executive Officers; FURTHER: That
SGC, working with SACUA if possible,
establish a policy committee under each
of the Vice Presidents.
Approved: A policy on classified re-
search (attached).
Accepted: A report (as amended)
from the Committee on Dorm Se-
curity.
MOVE:
Approved: That SGC endorses the
following demands and urges all stu-
dents to demonstrate before the Re-
gents this Friday in support of them:
1) End to all classified research; 2) End
to all research done by the Defense
and other military agencies; 3) The
University must provide 24 hour child

care centers; 4) The University should
provide facilities for anti-war groups;
5) End ROTC program; 6) End persecu-
tion of Course Mart 327. FURTHER: If
the Regents fail to accept these de-
mands. SGC will hold the Regents re-
sponsible for the crisis that will fol-
low.
Approved: A motion on OSS Place-
ment Policy on Recruitment (attach-
ed).
Approved: MOVE: The following
statement's conclusions:
The management at the A & P
Food Store at 413 E. Huron has issued
rn ultimatum to five of its male em-
ployees to "get their hair cut" to an
acceptable length or face suspension.
Management claims that these em-
ployees signed an agreement when theyj
were hired, in which they (the em-
ployees) agreed to keep their hairI
properly 'ttapered" up the back of
their head. This sort of agreement
management claims is forced on all
their male employees in accordance
with national A & P policy. Checks at
other local A & P's confirms that such
appearance regulations are nationalI
A & P policy. women are allowed anyI
hair length, as long as it is kept neat.
SGC has checked with Wrigley's, K-
( Mart, K & S Food Market, Food Mart,
Food and Drug, Big Top and White's
Market (a sample including both chain
stores and small independent stores)
and has discovered that none of these
stores follow a similar culturally re-
pressive employment policy against
males.
Anyone in the community can see by
'simple observation that the A & P
is more than happy to sell food and to
accept money from persons with any
length hair.
In view of the above and the insid-
ious attempts of therAtlantic and
Pacific Tea Co. to force its cultural
values on itsemployees, SGC urges all
people whose eyes fall on this state-
ment to refuse to buy at all A & P
Food Stores, in particular the store at
413 S. Huron, until the threat of su-
spension against its "long" haired
employees is lifted and its policy in
hiring is changed. We also urge people
to communicate to the management
at the Huron Store their refusal to buy
at A & P and their anger over the re-
Sgulations and suspension. We also urge
people to write to regional A & P man-
agement in Detroit at 5470 Hecla, Zip
48232.
Five employees face suspension with-
in the coming week of February 14th.
So please act now.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL
UNANIMOUSLY PASSED THE
IFOLLOWING MOTION ON MILITARY
F AND CLASSIFIED RESEARCH AT
ITS MEETING FEBRUARY 10, 1971
That SGC adopt the following posi-
f tion concerning military and classified
research.
The University of Michigan is now
conducting millions of dollars worth
of research to perfect weapon systems
and sub-systems which are being used
by the military to kill and incapaci-
tate human beings.
The issue that faces the University
community is simple. When the Uni-
versity accepts contracts from the De-
partment of Defense it provides the
military with more effective ways to
destroy and kill. If the goal of the'
University is to preserve and enhance
human life and resources, how can we
i allow this research to continue?
First, to agree to accept all research
is neither socially neutral nor re-
sponsible. The Department of De-
fense has the money, therefore it can
provide the most lucrative contracts to
the University. For the University to
accept those contracts is an endorse-
ment of the, status quo. Further, to
claim neutrality when the research
done here is now being used in U.S.
and South Vietnamese military efforts
Sin Indochina is morally indefensible.
The illusion of neutrality in accept-
ing these research contracts is clearly
shattered.

Second, the argument that the re-
suilts of this research can be used for
peaceful prrposes is not valid. When
research is funded by military agencies.
it is used by the military for its own
purposes. This research, especially when
it is classified, is not available fo
peaceful applications.
Third, the present criteria that class-
ified research cannot., be done if its
primary purpose is the development of
new technimues for destroying human
life is totally inadequate. The commit-
tee on Classified Research has only
stopped one contract. Committee mem-
bers do not even see the contracts, but
rather only a summary of the propos@
research.
Fourth, research done for peaceful
purposes does not have to be classi-
fied. The secrecy which now discredits
research done at the University can be
lifted.
In the light of the information
known about classified and war re-
search, SGC calls for the following
action:
1) An end to all classified research.
Contract proposals must be available
to anyone on demand.
2) An end to all research funded by
the Department of Defense or any
other military agency.
3) A new committee must be set up
to oversee all future research, to in-
clude a proportionate number of undek
graduates as well as graduate students.
Student Government Council realizes
that this stand on research in itself
will have little effect unless large num-
bers in the University demonstrate
their protest verbally and physically.
As preliminary steps, SGC calls for:
1) Immediate availability of all re-
search contracts to anyone in the Uni-
versity.
2) An opening of meetings of the
Classified Research Committee.
3) A demonstration of opposition to
military and classified research at next
week's Regents' meeting,
SOC will work with other individuals
and groups in effective but non-violent
ways, to end all military and classi-
fied research. The University must
longer be permitted to aid any form
of U.S. imperialism.
Student Government Council passed
the following motion on OSS Place-
ment Policy oi Recruitment at i t s
meeting February 10, 1971:
WHEREAS: SGC has long taken the
position that racist corporations should
not be allowed to recruit using Uni
versity Placement services; and
WHEREAS: The OSS Placement Pol-
icy on Recruitment provides an effec-
tive mechanism to prevent corporations
that practice discrimination anywhere
in the world from using OSS Place-
ment services;
WHEREAS: If the University's state-
ment against discrimination is to have
any meaning, then all placement of*
cers in the University must adopt a
similar policy;
BE IT RESOLVED: That SGC strong-
ly recommends that the Regents adopt
the Office of Student Services Policy
on Recruitment for all other University
placement offices;
FURTHER: That if the Regents at-
tempt to revoke this policy within
OSS, then they will be responsible fed
the crisis which would definitely de-
velop;
FURTHER: That copies of this mo-
tion and the motion on Recruiting
passed by SGC on October 7, 1970 be
sent to Vice President Knauss and
the Regents.
The Daily is anxious to cor
rect errors or distortions in
news stories, features, reviews
or editorials. If you have a conh-
plaint, please call Editor Mar-
tin Hirschman at 764-0562.

6 "ur N E/u"FUl/

Michael Davis
For the student body:
FLARES'
x
by
Levi
Farah
Wright
Tads
Sebring
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

(Continued from Page 1)
committee is distributing copies of
the "Political Biography of An-
gela Davis," some of her writings
from prison, and excerpts from
interviews with Davis in Muham-
med Speaks, t h e Black Muslim
official newspaper. Copies of the
petition are also available for sig-
nature at the table.
Thomas said that the group is
Body still
Unidentified
The identity of a body found by
a student behind Rackham Mon-
day morning remained a mystery
yesterday as fingerprint checks in
Lansing and Washington proved
negative.
The body of the approximately
50 year-old male carried no identi-
fication papers but police are not
treating the case as murder.
Ann Arbor Police Chief Walter
Krasny said yesterday that the
man probably slipped and fell
while intoxicated during last Fri-
day's snowstorm. Krasny added
that a whiskey bottle was found,
near the body.

t
1
l
4
j
1

LA / IEM / C/ U EGE/NU6 The Housing Policy Board is
composed of eight students and
currently in the process of ob- three faculty members, and de-
taining a film concerning Davis' termines the policy for the Office
life. In addition, her mother, Mrs. of Student Housing. All policies
Sally Davis, will speak in Detroit are subject to review by the OSS
March 7, and the group plans to Policy Board.
invite her to the University. .
Thomas added that the group e
would plan some sort of "mwhmasass ta te rupWlouv R un
action" during Mrs. Davis's visit.
The committee plans to form a
"united front" dedicated to free-,
ing "all political prisoners." This High closed
front w o u 1 d consist of "organi-
zations on campus as well as com- (Continued from Page 1)
munity organizations to mpake it
clear to people of both communi- Quigley said however, that th
ties that the need to free Angela junior high will reopen today.
Davis is bound up with the need In the Monday incident imme
to free Bobby Seale, Erika Hug- diately responsible for the high
gins and all political prisoners," school shutdown, more than 15C
Thomas said. black students marched up and
He added that the committee down hallways breaking windows
would also try to "relate all mass and assaulting whites, according to
action in the same direction as officials.
the peace movement to supple- Several carloads of State Polic
ment the efforts of peace-direct- were called to the high school to
ed organizations." break up the disturbance. Stat
The group as of now has no Police officers said that no arrests
formal organization, but is still were made, but several are pend
basically in the planning Cages. ing for assault and trespassing.
Thomas said that the main reason No serious injuries resulted from
for the committee's formation was the disturbance. However nine stu
to "hasten her (Angela Davis') dents were treated' for minor cuts
freedom in order to hasten the at Beyer General Hospital and sev
freedom of other political prison- eral police officers were assaulted
ers." according to authorities.

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