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February 17, 1971 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

*Nednesday, February 17, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Pne e

I uyc acvc I

Fife

strives

toward

personal

goal

By TERRI FOUCHEY
Triumphing over the adversity that was Pur-
due last weekend, snowstorms, falling buses, foul
trouble, and the Boilermakers themselves, is,
according to Wolverine captain Dan Fife, "what
makes a team a winner."
A winner is exactly what the Wolverines can
be called now that they have shown consistent-
ly that they are for real. Winning in college is
a new experience for the seniors and juniors on
the team, one they are enjoying very much.
Fife gives his reaction to this new habit the
cagers have acquired. "It's great. It's some-
thing I've always dreamed about."
The sophomores, Henry Wilmore, K e n
Brady, Ernie Johnson, John Lockard, and Leon
Roberts have contributed greatly in the change
with their talent and ,as Fife sees it, "Their
whole idea is winning. They've done nothing
since they've been here except win. They've
made believers of the seniors. Their winning
attitude has brushed off on us."
Another reason he points to is that the Wol-
verines are now crossing the fine line between
winning and losing. "The one-point games make
a big difference. Before we always lost them
in the last two minutes. Now we have so much
pride that we win it because we really make a
guy earn a shot. If a guy's with me, there's no
way he'll beat me or get it off because the
guys will be helping me and covering their men,
so if they win, they've earned it."
This success was predicted during the pre-
season, but it took a while to become a reality.

Fife comments, "Coach Orr had said that we
have the talent and when we get it together
we're going to be hard to beat. After we lost our
first three games and managed only close wins
over Eastern and Detroit, everyone thought he
was wrong.
"We got together after those games and talk-
ed things out. The sophomores started coming
of age and we began winning close games. When
we went to Hawaii we didn't play well the first
two games and we lost to Hawaii. Then we beat
Villanova and we saw we could win and one
victory just lead to another.
"The defense got together and everyone's
been pulling for everyone else. I've never been
involved in something like this and I still
don't know what to think. It's a little hard to
believe."
Fife views his role as captain as one of "sort
of setting an example. I try to do it by the
way I play and by the way I hustle." Head
coach Orr feels that Fife has filled this as-
signment admirable. "He's a tremendous leader.
Every game he's playing up to his capabilities.
He practices the same as he plays, with a great
deal of enthusiasm and desire.,"
Orr continues, "He's a super competitor and
this wears off on the others. He effects the way
the whole team is playing. He controls the of-
fense and makes the whole team go. He's ex-
tremely*unselfish on the court and would sac-
rifice anything for the team."
Assistant coach Fred Snowden adds, "Dan
commands great respect from his teammates.

They like him for the kind of person he is and
he relates well with his peer group. He's tied
the club together with his dedication and desire.
He's been the catalyst."
Fife finds that his coaches and senior team-
mates help a great deal with his duties as cap-
tain. "On trips they room the sophomores with
seniors and like I'm with Ken (Brady) and we
talk all the time. The rest of the seniors do the
same thing. We tell them how the weather or the
crowd at a place will be. We all just sort of act
like captains."
What Fife and Brady have been talking about
must be the right things, since Brady's develop-
ment has been one of the secrets of the Wol-
verines' success. Fife observes, "Brady's the
whole- secret to our fast break, which is the
key to our offense. Everytime we get a rebound
we.want to run the fast break and he gets them
for us. He's come along so far. The way he gets
the ball out and releases it so quick is amaz-
ing.
"When Brady's ready, it's going to be hard for
the other team. He can control a game with his
rebounds. For the guards it's great to know he's
back there, because if I do get beaten and my
man gets a shot, Ken will probably block it. He's
one reason why we gamble and steal a lot, be-
cause we know he's back there."
When the Wolverines don't use the fast break,
they go into a stack offense. Fife explains, "The
coaches came up with it as a way of utilizing
Hank's (Wilmore) great offensive talents."

Against Purdue. however, the Wolverines prov-
ed they could win without Wilmore who was
hampered by early foul trouble. Fife attributes
this to bench strength, and most of all the people
coming off the bench. "'Harry) Hayward came
in and did a great job, like all our bench can and
does. Everyone on the bench is of starting caliber.
Everyone else took up the scoring slack when
Hank was out. It was really a team victory.
"This happens all the time. If somebody's in
trouble or having a bad day, the guys just come
in and do an outstanding job. When they're on
the bench, they really watch the game closely
so that they understand it when they come in.
They give the guys who are playing pointers on
how to defense their men and other tips. We just
help each other out."
Fife gives his coaches credit for doing the
hardest and most important thing in making a
the team a winner. "They got people from every-
where, different backgrounds, and molded us to-
gether as a team. There's this tremendous friend-
ship, this feeling of everyone wanting to win for
everyone else. We're so much closer than any
other team I've been on.
"When I play badly, I feel like I'm letting the
team and the coaches down because they've work-
ed so hard. Everybody feels this way. If we play
like we can, I can't see anyone beating us because
everyone's willing to sacrifice what's necessary
to win. I think this team will be the one to allow
me to reach my goal of winning the Big Ten and
goin to the NCAAs."

Fife goes up for two,

fir ---

osU

bops Badgers;

BUCKS SLICE BRAVES

Boilers topple

Illinois
Rudy Benjamin with 18 topped
MSU, 2-6.
- * * a

Pistons wallop

By The Associated Press
MADISON - Ohio State's Buck-
eyes, sparked by Allan Hornyak'ss
6 points, battled from behind and
scored a 79-71 Big Ten basket-
ball victory over Wisconsin's hap-
less Badgers last night.
Hornyak took charge} midway
through the second half, scoring
17 points in directing the Buck-
eyes to their seventh conference
Kictory and their fourth in a row.
The loss was the Badgers' fifth
straight and dropped them to 1-6
in the league nd 6-11 over all.
Wisconsin grabbed a lead over
the surprised Buckeyes late in the
first half and led 41-39 at 'inter-
mission.
* Clarence Sherrod, who paced
Wisconsin with 23 points, helped
the Badgers roar to a 54-45 ad-
vantage before Ohio State set-
tled down and started its climb
back.
Purdue pounces

d daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
JOHN PAPANEK
the Illini dropped to a 4-3 record.
Illinois bounced ahead early in
the first half but Bob Ford took
charge to lead the Boilermakers
into a 36-36 halftime tie.
Illinois went ahead 39-36 on a
three-point play by sophomore Jim
Dedecker and stayed in front the
rest of the way until Gamauf hit
his basket to give the Boilermak-
ers a 69-68 lead.
Gamauf then reeled off four
straight free throws to clinch the
victory.
Ford, who scored two straight
baskets to help shave a 66-61

By The Associated Press
DETROIT-The Detroit Pistons,
fighting to hang on to second
place in the Midwest Division of
the Naitonal Basketball Associa-
Lin defeated the Bal1timorp Bul-

t , fe~4t Pli-m. - i
a ywke e scalpIe . lets 110-95 last night.D
MINNEAPOLIS -- Jerry P y 1 e Wes Unseld fired in 21 points
and Jim Brewer scored 37 points and Earl Monroe 15 for Balti-
between them to pace the Minne- more's 61-60 lead at the half.
sota Gophers to a 88-76 Big Ten In the third quarter, Detroit
basketball victory over Iowa's tossed in 11 of 21 from the floor,
Hawkeyes last night. with Dave Bing scoring eight, and
With a balanced attack that Jimmy Walker and Otto Moore six
produced five players in double .each, to vault ahead 84-76 in the
figures, the Gophers overcame the final period.
hot shooting of Iowa's Fred Bing wound up with 36 points,
Brown, who poured in 31 points, Walker 18 and Bob Lanier 16 for
including 13 field goals. the Pistons.
The victory, second in a row for * *n*
the starved Gophers, boosted4
them to a 2-6 Big Ten record, Braves boiled
ahead of Northwestern, now 1-5,* BUFFALO -Lew Acindor
and Wisconsin, 1-6, which lost puped i 38 A then Mil-
to Ohi State pumped in 38 points, then Mil -
to Ohio State. W.akeeouscored Buffalo 21-2 in,
Pyle scored 19 and snared 13 k.sr u l -
rebounds, as the Gophers com- the closing minutes as the Bucks
mended the boards much of them Associated Press demolished the Braves 135-103 last
time and took aim with a 49.4 BUFFALO'S PAUL LONG (left) tries a blind side steal on night for their seventh consecu-
percentage field goal average Milwaukee's Oscar Robertson (1) while Robertson is covered by tive National Basketball Associa-
compared with the Hawkeyes' 38.4 Mike Sillman (right). Lou Alcindor (33) attempts a block on tion victory.
n ,rn'nt Bratxo h.a12 j,.i L h Mill.. k 1.. th. 1n1 The Braves battled back from a

.,
a
i
r
s
e

Suns singe
BOSTON - Connie Hawkins of
Phoenix scored 17 points in the
last quarter yesterday as the Suns
defeated the Boston Celtics 119-
116 in a National Basketball As-
sociation game.
The Celtics, who trailed 58-53
at the half, closed the gap to 104-
102 with 3:27 to play on a Dave
Cowens' basket, but could get no
closer as Hawkins fired in two
baskets and six free throws from
that point on.
Hawks halted
CHICAGO-The Chicago Bulls
outmuscled and outshot Atlanta
last night for a 118-102 victory in

Bullets
a National Basketball Association
contest.A
After the first quarter, in which
the score was tied 27-27, Chicago
opened up a 40-30 lead in the first
few minutes with Jerry Sloan and
Bob Love collecting 11 of the 13
points.
Sloan, who wound up with 32
points, led Chicago to a 57-41
bulge shortly before the first half
ended. Atlanta's Walt Hazard
helped the Hawks stage a mild
comeback late in the third quarter
and the Hawks trailed only 66-60.
Walker, who wound up with 21
points, hit on four consecutive
baskets and in three minutes of

the Bulls moved out
78-65.

in

4 Professional League Standings

NBA
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
.W L Pct.

ww-_v cn .- ,,, rewer-- 1a p i. n. wuewn ega ,1-3.
CHAMPAIGN - Sophomore Illini' lead, led Purdue with 18 - .___--- - __ _______
Dennis Gamauf put Purdue ahead points and Gamauf finished with
with a basket with a little more 14. HEADS COLLEGE DIVISION:
than one minute to play and theti DeDecker, getting his first Illi-
converted four more free throws to nois start, led the Illini wit h
guide the Boilermakers to a 73- 19 and Nick Weatherspoon had 18.
W basketball victory over Illinois n 1 *s ha 18. r
"last night in a Big Ten basketball SNSVlto!
game. Spartans Stopped
The victory was Purdue's fifth By RANDY PHILLIPS His team's first year record of 18- Hailing from Battle Creek and Kel-
in eight conference games while G BLOOMINGTON - Paced by Even the most avid college fans 5 attests to the great success of :ogg Junior College, junior John
.... George Mclnnis 37 points and may not be able to recall many this approach. Hamilton provides floor leadership,
" " : .:* using a zone press to break the great basketball memories when, But a prominent question lingers. excellent outside shooting, and te-
Big Tenslow " ofense of Michigan confronted with the mention of How was Greene able to attract nacious defense. Hamilton also
State, Indiana overpowered t h e Louisiana State University at New players of such high caliber-in- scores over 20 points per game and
Spartans 90-76 in a Big Ten col- Orleans. And no would really ex- cluding junior college All-Ameri- has a 52 per cent shooting accur-
Sttan ings lege basketball game last night. pect any such remembrances about cans? "We sold some boys on the acy.
W L Pet. Michigan State had used the a college division team that start- opportunity to play . . . on being The third possible award winner
MICHIGAN 7 0 1.000 same offense a week earlier in ed its basketball program only two part of a building program," is sophomore Melvin Henderson.
Ohio Stat 7 1 875 East Lansing when the Hoosiers years ago. replied Greene. However, an added Henderson, 'a 6-3 forward, played
Ihianae 7 2 .75 squeezed out a 71-70 victory. But after an 18-5 finish in their aid most likely came from the 21 last season as a freshman and was'
Indiana 5 2 .715 initial season and an 18-0 record scholarships available t o t h e the team's number two scorer. The
Purdue 5 3 .625 Indiana built a 43-35 halftime this season combined with first LSUNO head coach, former all-state player from Ten-
Illinois 4 3 .572 lead, expanded it to 14 early in place status in the Associated The Privateer mentor is a strong nessee is endowed with great speed,
Iowa 3 4 .428 the second half and maintained Press' weekly poll, LSUNO looks advocate of hard work and physi- quickness, and leaping ability, and
nesota 2 6that rgi td o teend. more and more like a second Jack- cal conditionng. "It is commonly has a 19.9 average this year.
Mich. State 2 6 .250 Harris added 14 poitns and Joby sonville rags to riches story. known that what a player volun- C.B. Gordon was selected as
Wisconsin 1 6 .143 Wright had 12 for the winners, Coach and athletic director Ron tarily does in the off-season has a junior college All-America at Cen-
Greene has assembled a fine group great influence on his performance treville Junior College of suburban
of players from all over the coun- during the season. It is necessary Detroit while putting in 26.1 points
try, including two Michigan junior to put in time outside of the regu- per game and pulling off 17.7 re-
college products, kand has molded lar season." And Greene naturally Ibounds a contest. However, Gordon
H aywood dispute deepens; them into a quick, aggressive unit. considers his squad as being in has been hampered by a bad back
" n A major reason for LSUNO's fast "tremendously good p h y s i c a 1 this season and has not played reg-
racial issue blasts onel rise to national recognition has shape." ularly. Gordon at 6-5 gives LSUNO
been Greene's aggressive recruit- Besides the work of the coach, great depth at the forward posi-
By The Associated Press ing policy. This policy has been there must be a lot of talented tion, perhaps the best this, side of
* SAN FRANCISCO-A federal appeals court here ruled in aimed at getting top talent to come players behind to produce an 18-0 UCLA.
,vor of the National Basketball Association yesterday, holding that to LSUNO in such a way as to record. Included among them are Despite their shortness as com-
the Seattle SuperSonics will be subject to league sanctions should build a contending team quickly. three Little All-American candi- pared to many teams, LSUNO has
they continue to play controversial Spencer Haywood. Greene indicates that he must go dates. Heading the list is two-time a high 95 ints pe ame scoring
The 6-foot-9 Haywood, who jumped to the NBA from Denver out of state to get the quality per- captain Butch Webster, a 64 210 average. Balanced scoring (3 play-
of the American Basketball Association, has been playing with the sonnel needed for a top ranked col- pound forward. ers near 20 points per game) and
Sonics since last month under a lower court's injunction against ented players in Louisiana, but not mention All-Ameca d a hustling defense more than make
the NB. tdpaesi oiinbtntmnin mrc ntoy up for the disadvantage,
enough to go around . . ." junior college All-America at De
A three-judge U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel stayed the He added that the top ten ath- Kalb Junior College. This season The Privateers now have a fresh-
injunction yesterday pending consideration of the NBA appeal from letes are on a par with those of the senior from Atlanta, Georgia man team as they look more to-
the lower court action. the midwest, but after those select 'has compiled the impressive sta- wards the future, assuring itself
However, in issuing the stay, the judges said the NBA could take few the pickings get scarce. Greene tistics of a 27.2 scoring average and of a continuous stream of top
no action against the Sonics for playing Haywood while the injunc- attributes this shortage partially to a 12.4 rebounding average. He is teams. So, as a result coach
tion was in effect. the fact that Louisiana has better remarkably consistent, h a v i n g Greene has also shifted the empha-
* I aweather which enables students to scored in double figures in every sis of his recruiting program "We
LOUISVILLE, Ky.-Members of the Kentucky Colonels pro- play the other major snorts year LSUNO game. will sell prospects on being part of!
round. As a result of this situation However, the Privateers are not a first class winning program that
fessional basketball team have come to the defense of Coach Frank Greene has only one player from by any means a one man show. is going places."
Ramsey and denied a charge that -the team is plagued with racial Louisiana on his squad.
problems. Another reason why the Priva-
Bill Antonini, who resigned as trainer of the American Basket- teer mentor must look out of state
ball Association. team Monday, reported there was "complete chaos" is the intense competition for qual- Applications now being accepted for:
on the team, "the coach doesn't know what to do," and "there is a ity players. There are quite a num-
finite black-white problem on the club." ber of schools in the state that par- .
"Having played for a couple of other teams in this league, I'd ticipate in basketball on the var- CentrS d Judiciary
syIexcellent teams. This fact can be } t d n
aythis is one of the few teams that doesn't have a racial problem," isity level, and many of them have IiU
said Kentucky player Les Hunter, a black. seen by looking at the top ten 5 SEATS
Plavore~~~ee byr- Pniking atA thee topoi Tneni Tlmna nrEATSr (

pl5-point deficit to tie the game
81-81 in the third period before
the Bucks went ahead to stay and
hold a slim 96-93 after three
quarters.
Alcindor, who also snared 20
rebounds, hit all but two of his
points on 18 of 24 field goals in
the first three quarters.
He left the game with 5:44 to
play and Milwaukee leading 114-
101.
Greg Smith then took over the
Bucks' attack, hitting 11 of his
25 points in the runaway drive.

New York
Philadelphia
Boston
Buffalo
ce
Baltimore
Cincinnati
Atlanta
Cleveland
Weste
Mid,
Milwaukee

41 24
37 27
35 30
18 48
antral Division
35 27
24 39
24 41,
11 56
* * * *

.631
.578
.537
.267
.564
.381
.365
.164

GB
6
23%
111/
12%4
26%

Yesterday's Results
Phoenix 119, Boston 118
Detroit 110, Baltimore 95
Chicago 118, Atlanta 102
Milwaukee 135, Buffalo 103
New York at Los Angeles, inc.
Cincinnati vs. Portland at Eugene,
Ore., inc.
Only games scheduled.
Todays Games
Buffalo at Baltimore
Philadelphia vs. Milwaukee at
Madison, Wis.
Cincinnati at Phoenix
Boston vs. San Francisco at Oakland
Chicago at Cleveland
Portland at Seattle
only games scheduled.

ten Conference
dwest Division

Detroit
Chicago
Phoenix
Pacific
Los Angeles
San Francisco
.San Diego
Seattle
Portland

52 11
39 23
39 25
39 26
Division
37 24
34 31
29 37
28 36
22 39

.833 -
.633 1212
.613 13x/2
.602 14

.607
.523
.439
.438
.361

5
15

* ** *
NHL
East Division
W L TI
Boston 40 8 7
New York 34 13 10
Montreal 27 17 11
Toronto 28 z5 4
Buffalo 16 30 10
Detroit 16 31 8
Vancouver 17 33 5
West Division
Chicago 37 14 6
St. Louis 24 17 15
Pittsburgh 19 25 13
Minnesota 19 25 13
Philadelphia 20 26 10
Los Angeles 16 26 11
California 16 38 3

I I

Ptf. GF GA
87 270 143
78 184 134
65 198 156
60 198 165
42 143 208
40 151 207
39 150 203
80 208 134
63 155 145
51162 161
51 138 169
50 148 167
43 159 205
35 140 207

Hoope Pick ings

When you ponder over which
winners to pick in this week's
contest, take inspiration f r o m
one of the greatest competitors
in the history of organized ath-
letics, former President Thomas
E. Dewey.
Dewey, who as everyone knows
wrested the presidency from
Harry S. Truman in a landslide
vote, got his start as Daily staf-
fer, though the Daily disclaims
all responsibility for his subse-
quent achievements, which per-
haps cannot be said for Cottage
Inn pizza, Dewey being a per-
sonal testimony as tothe effect
the pizza can have on you.
Dewey's electoral success was
not duplicated in the prognosti-
cation game, as he never once
won Hoope Pickings during his
stay at Michigan. He had to pay
for his pizza, as w e 11 as his
bowling.
1. Minnesota at MICHIGAN
(pick score)
2. Northwestern at Ohio State
3. Pudrue at Iowa
4. Indiana at Illinois
5. Wisconsin at Michigan
State
6. Virginia at Duke
7. St. Louis at Memphis State
8. So. Illinois at No. Illinois

Yesterday's Results
St. Louis 5, California 1
Boston at Vancouver, inc.
Only games scheduled.
Today's Games
New York at Montreal
Pittsburgh at Toronto
Buffalo at Chicago
Philadelphia at Los Angeles
California at Minnesota
Only games scheduled.
AIR PORT
LIMOUSINESb
for information call
971-3700
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips/Day

President Dewey

9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

North Texas St. at Bradley
W; Michigan at Kent State
Georgia Tech at Hawaii
Harvard at Princeton
N. Carolina St. at Wake
Forest
Marquette at Air Force
Detroit at Boston College
Georgia at Mississippi
Arizona State at Arizona
California at Washington
DePaul at Dayton
Pudget Sount at Portland
-1

For the student body:
LEVI'S
CORDUROY
Slim Fits ......$6.98
(All Colors)
Bells ........$8.50
DENIM

o~jA
I COFFE

Bush Jeans
01' 1.

..$10.00
T~o r(1(

.

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