100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 02, 1971 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4Ruesday, February Z, 1971

THE MICHIGAN [DAILY

Page Seven

tuesday, February 2, 1971 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

a

thet
upper deck
The Hall of Fame .. .
the great and merely good
By RICK CORNFELD
Enshrinement in baseball's Hall of Fame is getting to mean so
little that the better books on baseball history don't even
bother to mention whether a player is a member.
That's why when the nation's sportswriters saved us from
Early Wynn and Ralph Kiner, great diamond authorities from
Bowie Kuhn on down congratulated the writers on their discrimi-
nation.
Then, Sunday, the old-timers on the old-timers committee
came to the rescue by selecting seven of the great, the near-
great and the merely good for induction. They gave up Rube
Marquard, whom most people have heard of, and Dave
Bancroft, whom most people haven't-and not without reason.
People know about Marquard, although perhaps confusing
him with the fireballing and fire engine chasing Rube Waddell,
because he once won 19 games in a row. But Marquard, who was
once arrested for speculating in World's Series tickets, pitched 15
full seasons and lost more games than he won in six of them.
In all, he won 205 games, but he also lost 177, and he managed
to be among the season's top five in earned run average only
once. There were probably at least a dozen hurlers in his time
better than he was. Among pitchers of the 1960s that would be
like putting in, say, Camilo Pascual.
Marquard was one of four old old-timers admitted-players
who performed over 40 years ago let in by a special ruling.
Another one was Harry Hooper, who is most famous for play-
ing in the same outfield with Tris Speaker and Duffy Lewis.
Many people argued that that was the greatest outfield of
the day.
His lifetime batting average was .281, a pretty fair mark by
today's standards, but he played with Ty Cobb, George Sisler and
Rogers Hornsby.
* The real old-timers admitted were Jake Beckley and Joe
Kelley. Beckley was a slugging first baseman for a number of
teams around the turn of the century. He played in the days of
130 game seasons, but only three people ever hit more triples
and only 15 drove in more runs.
Kelley, who played left field for the fabled Baltimore
Orioles of the 1890s, used to do things like hide baseballs in the
'a tall grass in the outfield. When an opposing batsman would
knock a hit between him and the center fielder, he would re-
trieve the closest hidden ball and hold the surprised runner to
a single.
He once hit .393 and ranked only sixth in the league. He was a
groovy guy on a groovy team. Five of his groovy teammates are
already enshrined, and some day they'll probably make it unani-
mous.
A couple of more recent players were also selected, along with
George Weiss, the Yankee and Met general manager. If you
accept the theory that executives should be enshrined, you can't
argue with the selection of Weiss, just as in a few years you won't
be able to dispute the selection of Walter O'Malley or Paul Rich-
ards, you poor fellow.
About Bancroft, a switch-hitting slick-fielding shortstop,
there is not much to say. On the other hand, things can be
found to say about Chick Hafey, the last new Hall of Famer.
Like that Hafey, a slugging Cardinal outfielder, once won a
batting championship, making him unique among the seven
inductees.
t Bob Broeg, sports editor of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, an-
ticipated the selection of Hafey a couple of weeks ago in a con-
versation about Cooperstown.
"I've felt the Hall of Fame has been very easy to get into,"
Broeg said. "But once you start to break down the barriers, you've
got to be fair to the guys who aren't in."
He cited the examples of Heinie Manush and Goose Goslin,
two hard-hitting outfielders of the '20s and '30s admitted in the
past few years. Broeg didn't think Manush and Goslin were de-
serving on their own right, but, he said, "once you let those guys
in you gotta let in people like Hafey."
Broeg, who is a member of the screening committee
which each year selects 50 players to be eligible for selection
by the writers, said of the old-timers committee, "They're less
restrictive than we are and more generous. Sometimes they
let sentiment carry them away."
One example of how the committee is ruled by sentiment is
that dead men have a much harder time getting into the Hall than
men who can accept induction themselves. Of this year's seven,
all but the nineteenth century players and George Weiss, who
died last year, are still alive.
A living player is much more satisfying to have in Coopers-

town. He can utter all the proper words of gratitude and humility
and can even show a trace of tear when Bowie Kuhn presents him
with his plaque.
Jim Bottomley, poor guy, died 10 years ago. A power
hitting first baseman, his credentials for Cooperstown are as
good as those of many other players already in. He may be
no Bill Terry, but, with one home run championship, two runs
batted in crowns, a .310 lifetime average and the feat of 12
rbi's in one game, he would seem to have better qualifica-
tions than, say, Harry Hooper.
But it seems like Bottomley will have to wait while they get
in the living players while they can. That's the crime you've got to
pay for a premature death these days.
Actually, however, even admitting Bottomley would demean
the Hall of Fame, for though a good player he really should not
rank among the immortals. It used to be that there were good
players not in the Hall, which was made up of men that were
true giants, in myth at least, like Cy Young, Honus Wagner,
Christy Mathewson and Babe Ruth.
. But who is Mathewson, if opposite his plaque rests the one
of Marquard, his teammate? Who is Speaker, if equally en-
shrined is his outfield mate, Hooper?
Who is Wee Willie Keeler, when Kelley, one of his fellow
cheaters on the Orioles but by far his inferior as a player, receives
the same recognition?
Enshrinement in Cooperstown used to be the greatest honor
baseball could bestow. Pretty soon it may be almost a disgrace to
be left out.

Hoopsters
By BOB HEUER
After two decisive wins at
Northwestern and Minnesota, t h e
Michigan cagers bring their de-
vestating road show back home as
they meet the also-unbeaten Pur-
due Boilermakers tonight at 8:00.
Saturday night's 97-79 decision
over the Gophers moved Michigan
into sole possession of first place
in the Big Ten as Michigan State
toppled previously unbeaten Ohio
State. Purdue and Illinois were
both victorious in non-league con-
tests Saturday; the Illini nipping
Notre Dame, 69-66 in overtime and
Purdue squeezing past Marshall
University 79-75.

tackle

Purdue

Hoosiers
outside
By The Associated Press Kansas
BLOOMINGTON - Sophomore rival K
George McGinnis poured in 45 minutes
points last night as Indiana Univer- EightC
sity pulled out a hard-fought 113- tory.
112 basketball victory over North- A ca
ern Illinois. watched
The Hoosiers trailed by as many pull eve
as 11 points in the first half and utes, at
ended the stanza trailing 55-49. vid Hal:
However, they used some torrid with 9:2
shooting to move into an 89-79 lead After
with Just over eight minutes left in its way
the game. by Pier
The Huskies did some hot shoot- and Bu
ing themselves and pulled within throw b
two points, 98-96, with 3:49 re-
maining to play. Indiana managed
to build up a seven-point spread
again before N closed the gapFo
to three.
* * *
Wildcats roll L10
LEXINGTON - Eighth - ranked
Kentucky manhandled Auburn in a DETi
nearly flawless first half last night Ford, o
and coasted to a 114-76 Southeast- of the:
ern Conference basketball victory. has aut
The Wildcats, strengthening their to begin
conference lead, hit 72 per cent facility
from the field and all of their free Thei
throws before intermission to put letter to
Auburn down by 25 points at the man of

take

win

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
SANDI GENS
Tonight's clash provides John-
ny Orr's charges with the oppor-
tunity to knock off another t o p
contender in the conference race.
A win would reduce the number of

broke away from bitter
ansas State in the final 10
last night for a 79-74 Big
Conference basketball vic-
apacity crowd of 17,000
d the underdog Wildcats
n twice in the final 10 min-
58-58 with 9:35 left on Da-
L's one-hander, and at 60-60
20 remaining.
the last tie, Kansas shot
into a 67-60 lead on goals
re Russell, Dave Robisch
ad Stallworth and a free
by Robisch.
rd okays
ROIT ( -) - William Clay
wner of the Detroit Lions
National Football League,
horized the city of Pontiac
construction of a stadium
to be leased by the club.
authorization came in a
Harold A. Cousins, chair-
the city of Pontiac Stad-
ilding Authority. Pontiac is
20 miles north of Detroit.
letter virtually eliminated
sibility of the Lions mov-
stadium being planned for
roit riverfront. Ford prev-
had announced plans to
o Pontiac unless a Detroit
group came up with a
at plan for construction of
m.

--Daily-Denny Gainer
de

Grabiec (

!40) lets one go from outsi

1
S
i
i
a
7
t
l
F
i
1

undefeated teams in the Big Ten
to two. d stands 6-7 and weighs 230 and
The Boilermakers are led by 6-3 Faerber is 6-5%/2, 215 pounds.
senior guard Larry Weatherford, King will attempt to counter
who directs the offensive attack Michigan's superior speed by us-
and is averaging 21.6 points a ing some sort of zone defense or
game. Center Bill Franklin has by adjusting his own line-up to
been a pleasant surprise this sea- get more speed on the floor. Re-
son, adding 18 points and a dozen serve forward Jovon Price has the
rebounds a game. quickness to do the job at 6-6,
Coach George King expressed 185, but is averaging only 2.9 a
concern about dealing with the game in limited duty this year.
potent Michigan offense. "We're King was not pleased with the
going to have our hands full try- team's narrow victory over Mar-
ing to stop two corner men with shall last Saturday. "We were
the quickness of Rodney Ford and stale after our two week layoff for
Henry Wilmore," he said, final exams," he said. "The of-
Purdue's starting forwards, Bob fense was largely ineffective
Ford and George Faerber are large against Marshall's zone."
in stature but slow afoot. Ford It was another brilliant t e a m

effort Saturday in Michigan's dis-
memberment of Minnesota. Wayne
Grabiec shot a sizzling 63 per cent
on his way to 20 points. Rodney
Ford was on his game, holding
sophomore star Jim Brewer to
seven points while scoring 14 of
his own.
Henry Wilmore went on a ram-
page after Minnesota had drawn

to within four points early in the
second half. The sylph-like soph-
omore scored 18 of his 31 points
in the final 12 minutes.
All defenses have been alike in
their inability to stop the Wolver-
ines' attack in recent weeks.
Minnesota came out in a 2-3 zone
Saturday, but hot shooting by the
guards brought them out of it be-
fore long.
Against a man-to-man defense,
the triple screen goes into effect,
with Wilmore, Fordhand Brady
lined up alongside the key. This
set-up usually gets Wilmore the
ball for a shot or drive, or a feed
inside to Ford or Brady.

half.
Jayhawks jive
LAWRENCE -- Fifth -

ranked

College Basketball
Indiana 113, Northern Illinois 112
Kentucky 114, Auburn 76
bt65, Tennessee 60
Due8,South Carolina 61
LSU 90, Mississippi State 71
New Mexico State 75, Hardin-
Simmons 57
Temple 54, Drexel 53
Abilene Christian 86, Air Force 76
Kansas 79, Kansas State 74
Providence 79, Seton Hall 67

ium Bui
located
Thel
any pos
ing to a
the Det
iously h
move to
stadium
clear-cu
a stadiu

College Cage
1. Marquette (18)
2. Southern Cal. (7)
3. UCLA (7)
4. Penn
5. Kansas
6. Jacksonville
7. South Carolina
8. Kentucky
9. Western Kentucky
10. LaSalle
11. Tennessee
12. Notre Dame
13. Utah State
14. Duquesne
15. Illinois
16. North Carolina
17. Villanova
18. Houston
19. Murray State
20. MICHIGAN

Poll
16--0+
16--0
15-1
16-0
14-1
14-2
11-3
13-3
14-3
14-1
13-3
10-5
16-3
12-2
9-3
12-3
15-4
5--3
14-2
10--4

616
584
558
458
393
321
210
189
153
132
122
117
105
92
75
68
56
31
28
24

Hoope Pickings
To the Daily:
It has come to my attention that at the University of Michigan,
that veritable citadel of educational academia, there was not a single
student among your many thousands who could correctly prophesy the
outcome of a mere 19 basketball games and 1 hockey game on a given
night.
I am told that the winner of your contemptable contest, a certain
Mr. Robert Black of Nakamura Co-op, was irreconcilably in error on not
one, two, or three, but four of his predictions.
And don't try and tell me that your students don't enter the contest
because they lack incentive. I know that the dream of a Cottage Inn
pizza (your prize) for their Sunday dinner sustains countless stud ts
through an otherwise unpalatable week. Things haven't changed t.It
much in 62 years.
No more moola for youla
Nehemiah H. Sludd, Class of '07

$650.00/SIX WEEKS
SUMMER STUDY IN
SOUTHERN FRANCE
July 5-Auqust 14,, 1971
* French Elementary, Interme-
diate, and Advanced Levels
" Earn up to .6 University
Credits
0 Information: Study Abroad
Office (Miss Apple) 764-0310
or come to 1223 Angell Hall
0 Application Deadline: March
31, 1971

TV RENTALS
$10o per month
FREE Service and Delivery
---NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED---
CALL:
Nelac TV Rentals
662-5671
SERVING BIG 10SCHOOLS SINCE 1961

I

For the student body:
SGenuine
Authentic
Navy
PEA COATS
$25
Sizes 34 to 46
CHECKMATE

State Street at Liberty

1. Northwestern at MICHI-
GAN (pick score)
2. Purdue at Indiana
3. Minnesota at Illinois
4. Ohio State at Michigan
State
5. Iowa at Wisconsin
6. Creighton at Notre Dame
7. North Carolina State at
Virginia
8. Florida at Auburn
9. Pennsylvania at Columbia
10. Western Kentucky at
! Middle Tennessee

11. Yale at Dartmouth
12. Maryland at Duke
13. Xavier at Detroit
14. South Carolina at Clemson
15. Mississippi at Kentucky
16. Ohio U. at Western
Michigan
17. Jacksonville at Oklahoma
City
18. Marquette at DePaul
19. SPECIAL: Indiana at
MICHIGAN, track
20. SUPER SPECIAL: Iowa at
MICHIGAN, wrestling

r---

AI

MACROB
HEALTHI
COrd

IOTIC, VEG

ETARIAN
vDAAvc

and

Do you think
abright young engineer'
his mostimaginative years on
the same assignment?
Neither d:~we.' a iu
That's why we have a two- You may selectspecia
year Rotation Program for ized jobs, or broad systems-
graduating engineers who type jobs. Or you can choose
would prefer to explore several not to change assignments if
technical areas. And that's why you'd rather develop in-depth
many of our areas are organ- t skills in one area.
ized by function-rather than' Either way, we think
by project. you'll like the Hughes ap-
At Hughes, you might proach.
work on spacecraft, communi- It means you'll become
cations satellites and/or tacti- more versatile in a shorter
cal missiles during your first If you qualify, we'll arrange for time.-r------
two years. you to work on several different (And your ; HUGHES
All you need is an EE, ME assignments...and you can salary will L----------
or Physics degree and talent. help pick them. show it.) .,.SPACCRAFT COMPANY

rnnr aniff~U

run LUUFr\DuvN)

at

ke Bookshop

215 S. STATE STREET

.1

769-1583

2nd Floor

IT'S A GOOD THING"
HI.FI BUYS IS IN TOWN
BECAUSE ONLY WE CARRY

1111

E

BIC LUX
Receivers

S------------------------------------------------------,n

UNWANTED PREGNANCY?
Have a Legal Abortion Performed by License/Certi-
fied Gynecologists in New York State.
Pregnancies to 12 wks.-$200.00
P'rpnnn 0 i c 2-1nc V on- flfl

[ll

II

These receivers have so many features the list would stretch
from here to . . . well, exaggeration isn't necessary when
you think of the computer controlled noise suppression circuit,
and the multitude of tone controls, filters and the many inputs
and outputs. You don't have to take our word for it when we
say it's the best available, just come on down to Hi-Fi Buys

I

I CAMPUS INTERVIEWS:
February 16, 1971
Representatives of several activities of Hughes Aircraft Company (each with highly-
specialized personnel requirements and separate interview schedules) will visit your
rmmnim if mir rnreer interets lie in one nr more of the following fields of aro-

I

I

i i lli

i

k I f e r f r i t l

1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan