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January 31, 1971 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-31

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IAI A. \t Y1i

THE MICHIGAN DAILY e~
__________________________________-I

ruge bevven

I

SPECIAL
4 Mr. Ham's
OR
4 Mr. Beef's
for the price of 3
$3.16 value for $2.37, plus tax
MR. HAM & MR. BEEF-640 Packard

Low level playing by Ranters

Australian censorship laxes as
obscenity bans on books eased

(Continued from Page 2L)
guitar, an instrument somewhat
foreign to British music, he car-
ried a great deal of the rhythm
and the bass, but at times was
very sloppy. He was also q u i t e
a good singer, but never o u t -
standing, I was left with the
!impression that he wasn't
4 reaching his capabilities in
either area.
Apart from his performance
on the pipes, the fiddle playing
of Collin Ross seemed very me-
diocre. He lacked the speed and
the technique of a great fiddler.
Perhaps this is traceable to the
change in format. The Ranters
are accustomed to playing at
dances, and a really fast fiddler
would have the dancers on the
floor within half an hour.
The third set showed a mark-
ed improvement in the coordi-
nation of the musicians as a
band, but still had several sig-
nificant flaws.
One of the outstanding disas-
ters of this set was a guitar in-
strumental by Tom Gilfellon.
Not only did his arrangement
lack the necessary bass runs or
chording (made up primarily of
"fiddle style" picking only on the
top three strings), but he made
_ several very noticeable mistakes
by picking deadened strings.
Johnny Handle also played
some piano. Though the pieces
were in a simple almost 1930's

style, the audience enjoyed them.
Consistant with the nature of
this type of music, the b a n d
seemed to attempt to be "rous-
ing" through most of the even-
ing. The audience reacted well,
but by the third set I was tired
of being "roused."
If the band failed musicly, I
might attribute it in part to a
lack of drunkeness. I heard a
lot of this type of music this
fall in England, and found it
best performed by drunks to a
very drunk audience. This is not
to discredit the music in t h e
least; simply to account for an-
other change in atmosphere.
The music rang loud as the
audience sang along, "She's a
big lass and a bonnie lass / And
she likes her beer / And t h e y
call her Bushy Butterfield / And
I wish she were here."
The applause and the voices
of the audience were again ring-
ing off the walls as the band
closed with "Soldier's Joy," fol-
lowed by an encore of "Strip
the Willow." To my m i n d, I
have heard m u c h better per-
formances of both numbers, but
the audience certainly approved.
Though there w e r e little
sparks of excitement from time
to time, Friday night the High
Level Ranters simply lacked the
magic and expertise I expected
from such a highly acclaimed
group.

SYDNEY, Australia GIP) - For overseas, and passed them around..

the first time in 36 years, it's legal
for Australians to read Henry Mil-
ler's "Tropic of Cancer."
It is one of seven of the Ameri-
can author's books removed this
month from the government's list
of banned publications.
Actually, "Tropic of Cancer"
has been available since it was
published, on a black market.
Various persons also brought

Australia's chief censor is the
minister of customs and excises,
Don Chipp. He is caught between
organizations which seek to ex-
tend censorship and those who
want to abolish it.
"As far as the word obscene is
concerned, I have not the faintest
idea what it means," Chipp ob-
served. In citing one view that;
anything which distorts life is ob- j

be considered in breach for a
sugar-coating he gave to life.
At one time the list of banned
works included some children's
books which dared to contain
drawings of bare-bottomed cher-
ubs.
About 125 books are still not of-
ficially available. Customs offic-
ials will not make the list avail-
able: inquiries have to be made
title by title. Even then, there are
problems. The American edition
of "Myra Breckenridge" is banned;
the expurgated British version is
not.
Doubtful books are sent to the
federal capital for decision.

copies in when returning from scene. he said Walt Disneyv could
Party selects candidates

PRESCRIPTION EYEWARE
and SHADES

iContinued from Page 1 -- The establishment of at
-The immediate construction zen's review board for all city,
of 5000 units of tenant-controlled enforcement agencies; and
housing by the city to be open to
all income levels; The University governance
-The establishment of free by a council composed of az
neighborhood child-care centers jority of representatives from
throughout the city; segments of the University c
-A graduated income tax; munity and a minority electe
-The development of a mass the local community on a st
public transportation system for wide basis.
the city; In addition, the new party ca
-The repeal of ordinances re- for a complete halt to all Am
stricting the use of certain drugs, can military involvement in
including marijuana, LSD and eign countries.
opiates;
-The establishment of a strict The party members table
ecological code for the city in health care proposal on the co
which the sale and use of ciga- tion that a revised version of
rettes in public institutions would plan would be presented at
be banned; party's next mass meeting.

1 v seCIVII S t V IT ere hinks
laiw a book is unsuitable, the owner or
publisher can appeal to a National
Literature Board of Review, which
run makes recommendations to Chipp.
ma- He is not obliged to accept them,
nall Books seized as obscene are held
om- until it is determined whether
d by they may be distributed. If the de-
ate- cision is no, the copies are de-
stroyed. An official says: "The
ailed progress of a banned book to the
neri- incinerators is closely watched.
for- Every copy has to be accounted
S. for."-

w, -,
r.'
,'

GENOVESE
4 p.m.-Rackham
Mon., Feb. 1

"Australian standards of per-
d a missiveness are not developing
ndi- nearly as fast as standards of per-
the missiveness in some of the books
the and films trying to break in from
overseas," Chipp says.

675 L. t. Aqsr
6"2 5903

Join The Daily

r

Famous Make Instruments

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528- L.S.A. Bldg., before
2 p.m., r f the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear only once. Student organiza-
tion notices are not accepted for
publication. For more information,
phone 764-9270.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31
Day Calendar
Family Recreation Prog.: for faculty.
staff and married students, Intramural
Sports Bldg., 1:30 p.m.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY I The Upjohn Co.
FEB. 10:
American Culture: E. Genovese.U. Inland Steel Co.
of Rochester, "Prospects for an Aca- American Mg. Sy
demic Intelligentsia," Rackham Lect. U.S. Plywood
Hall, 4 p.m. State of Mich. C
Botany Seminar: Dr. A. E. Star, FEB. 11:
Trenton St. Coll., "Flavonoid Chem- Burroughs Wellcor
istry as Applicable to Hybrid Prob- Chicago Paymen
lems in Pityrogramme," Matthaei Bt- Soc. Security
anical Gardens. 4 p.m. RCA
Public Health Lecture: Dr. W Ham- FEB. 12:
mon. U of Pittsburgh. "Dengue Hemor- General Services
rhagic Fever," Aud., SPH, 4 p.m. The Travelers In
General Notices SUMMER PLAC
212 S.BA.
Medical Forum Lecture: Dr. H. Levy, Interviews at SP
"Military vs. Medical Ethics," Wed., views by phone or
Feb. 3, noon, 6th fl. amph., Univ. Hos- FEB. 1:
pital; 4 p.m., N. Lecture Hall, Med. Good Humor C
Sci. II; 8 p.m., S. Lecture Hall, Med terviewing 9 to 5,j
Sdl. II. FEB. 3:

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(lower level)
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ompany, Detroit in-
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saxophone or violin for as long as you wish.
0 All payments apply to purchase
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0 3 month minimum
RIINNIELL
323 S. Main 662-5667

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a charter realty apartment y 665-8825
Read and Use Daily Classifieds

"- -

For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
A Farah
Wright
Tads
* Sebring
State Street at Liberty

a
3
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Foreign'.Visitors
Following individual can be reached
through the Foreign Visitor Div., Rms. |
22-24, Mich. Union, (764-2148): S. Hyun,
Law and Pub. Ad. Inst., Korea Univ.,
Seoul, Korea, Feb. 1-2.
Placement !
3200 S.A.B.
Following Interviews will be held
at PlacementtServices, stop in or
call 763-1363.
FEB. 8:
Aetna Life and Casualty
Appliedl Computer Time Share, Inc.
Abraam"&Straus
Harris Trust and Savings Bank
eDfense Intelligence Ag.
Ford Motor Co.
Nat'l Cash Register (NCR)G

Camp Tamarack, Detroit Fresh Air
Society, interviewing 9 to 5; openings
for cabin .counselors, specialists in wat-
erfront, arts and crafts, nature camp-
craft, tripping, dramatics, dance, pup-
petry, counselors for pioneer and out-
post camping, unit aid assistant unit
supervisors, caseworkers, nurse, truck-
bus drivers, cooks assts.
FEB. 4:
Camp Tamarack, see information
above.
TEACHING INTERVIEW SCHEDULE
FEB. 8:
Mt. Kisco, N.Y.
Montclair, N.J.
FEB. 9:
Davison; Mi.
Newton, Mass.
Grand Blanc, Mi.
Midland, MI.
FEB. 10:

Newton, Mass.

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GRADS ONLY!
"Non-violence in Jewish Tradition"
Speaker-RABBI GERALD GOLDMAN
P.M.-Deli Dinner
P.M.-Discussion on Non-violence
This Sunday, Jan. 31
HILLEL FOUNDATION
Hill 663-4129

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dot mixers
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Our cotton coordinates are
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Left: Shaped jacket, $14.

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Entire Stock of 5000 Pair

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Ring-buckled skirt, $10.
Right: Cutaway tunic, $12.
Straight-leg pant, $11.

FLARES

--BELLS

Cotton jeans, cords, wool dress or flare, permanent press
Buy 1st pair at Provided 2nd pair
regular price-get priced no more than
2nd pair J2£f1st pair

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