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January 31, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-31

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Sunday, January 31, 1971 ' '

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, January 31, 1971k

1AM AGREEMENT

Black admissions: Seeking

10%0

FEBRUARY 2
TUESDAY LUNCH-DISCUSSION
AT THE INTERNATIONAL CENTER
"AFSCME: Issues and Negotiations"
ROBERT ROSNER, President, Council 7, AFSCME
Cost: 50c
Sponsored by Ecumenical Campus Center

HEAR-

Linda Jenness

member
socialist worker's
party

(Continued from Page 1)
Some administrators claim
that ligh school counselors in
the inner cities often discourage
black students from applying to
the University.4
J. Frank Yates, director of the
Coalition for the Utilization of
Learning Skills, says that an
important factor in keeping
minority students will be how
well faculty members can teach
people different from them-
selves. "There are enough bod-
ies," Yates says of the number
of qualified blacks. '
To reach a manimum number
of minority high school stu-
dents, the. University has
tnounted an extensive recruiting
effort. Five undergraduate ad-
missions counselors have already
been hired and the admissions
office is interviewing for two
additional positions.
Two of these seven new admis-
sions officers will be stationed
in Detroit ate the University's
Rackham Extension Bldg. with
a third at the University's
Grand Rapids Extension Center.
Each of the five new coun-
selors, he says, have logged
about 3,550 miles during t h e
fall, visiting and often revisiting
a total of 125 high schools and
14 community colleges in the
state.
"Student recruiters also go
out to the high schools," Good-
man adds. "We have contact
people in all of the academic
units and they send representa-
tives from the academic units
to us."
Stevens claims the University
is using "conventional means of
recruiting and admissions for
an unconventional situation".
She urges a greater effort to re-
cruit Chicanos and blacks, es-
pecially veterans and older peo-
ple who want to continue their
education.
The main inducement that re-
cruiters can offer black and oth-
er minority high school stud-
ents is the University's Oppor-
tunity Program. Established in
1962, the program is open to all
disadvantaged students but is
approximately 87 per cent black.
The program aids students
both financially and academi-
cally, providing special counsel-
ing and tutoring, along w i t h
grants. loans and jobs to help
pay tuition and living costs. Un-
dsrgraduates require an aver-
age of $1,700 and graduate stu-
dents need about $3,900 in aid
annually.
Approximately 675 students
are now enrolled in the under-
graduate Opportunity Program
with an additional 133 students

in the graduate section. Fresh-
man enrollment under the plan
has increased from 70 in 1964 to
268 in 1970.
Of the 522 applicants for the
undergraduate p r o g r a m last
year, 49 per cent were admitted
to the University.
An increase of 370 under-
graduate and 180 graduate stu-
dents in the program is ex-
pected for next fall.
Besides the University-wide
Opportunity Program, a num-
b ber of the schools and colleges
have their own minority recruit-
ment efforts.
Black enrollment in the law
school has risen from none in
1966 to about 75 students at pre-
sent, eight per cent of the total
enrollment. Of this year's in-
coming class of 419 students, 50
were black and two were chi-
cano.
The medical school has a sum-
mer program for minority un-
dergraduates who are interest-
ed in medicine and sends out
faculty members and students to
recruit. Thirty students out of
an entering class of 225 last fall,
or 13 per cent, were black.
Doing most of its own re-
cruiting, the social work school
already has about 14 per cent
minority enrollment. T h e
school's entering class this year
was 19 per cent black and two
per cent chicano.
In the graduate school, black
enrollment has increased de-
spite a drop of about 10 per cent
in overall admissions. Many of
the 150 departments which en-
roll graduate students h a v e,
their own recruiting programs.
While no figures are avail-
able for the total number of
black graduate students this
year, by the end of last May

admission certificates had been
sent to 140 black students com-
pared with 50 the year before.
Total black graduate enrollment
last year was about 400.
One of the major questions of
the admissions problem is whe-
ther these recruitment programs
in the schools and colleges can
meet the 10 per cent black en-
rollment figure without dimin-
ishing admission standards.
After the agreement last
spring, Vice-President Spiro Ag-
new charged the University had
surrendered" to black militants
and that "in a few years time
perhaps-thanks to the Univer-
sity of Michigan's callow re-
treat from reality-America will
give the diplomas from Michi-
gan the same fish eye that
Italians now give diplomas from
the University of Rome," which
has an open admissions pro-
gram.
Fleming emphasizes, however,
that the Opportunity Program
is not an open admissions pro-
gram. "We will maintain the
standard that to be admitted a
student must show reasonable<
probability of success in his aca-
demic program," he says.
Citing differences in cultural
and educational opportunities,
Fleming said that traditional
criteria for judging high school
students, such as SAT scores
and high school grades, are
sometimes inadequate.
"We've never denied that we
use somewhat of a . different
standard for these people."
Fleming says. "We defend it on
the grounds that this is a criti-
cal social problem that each in-
stitution must help and this is
our contribution."
Stevens believes the Univer-
sity should go further, point-

ing out that other schools such
as Harvard, Yale and North-
western have successful pro-
grams which offer to blacks with
high school grade points lower
than the cutoff used here.
"The entrance criteria are too
stilted," she says. "They are
incidental to how a stulent per-
forms."
While students and adminis-
trators thus hold different opin-
ions about whether the 10 per
cent black admissions foal will
be met, they all seem to agree
it is worthwhile.
"A lot of people have been ex-
cluded here who could have
made it," says Yates, a situa-
tion described by Maddox as a
"tragic waste of human re-
sources."
But looking 'at the results of
the BAM agreement thus far
Hunt says, "On paper it accom-
plished a lot but whether this
bud is going to become a rose,
I'm pessimistic."
TUESDAY: SUPPORTIVE
SERVICES

Beau tfu 1 li porled an Do in es/c
LEATHER
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Morrocan Imports
Distinctive Men and Women's Clothing

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SPEAKING ON:
Amiterican Imperialism
and the current radicalization'
MONDAY, FEB. 11
8:00 P.M.
3524 SAB

13 17 S. University

769-4529

11

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- - -- - -- ------

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Sat., Sun.-Jon. 30, 31
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dir. Joseph Kadar, Czechoslovakia (1965)
Oscar for Best Foreign Film of 1965
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World War 11.
"The Shop on Main Street" will make you laugh and, if you ever
cry at movies, it will make you cry. It is very funny and very
sad, and vho could ask more of a movie than that?"
-Brendan Gill New Yorker

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