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January 26, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-26

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11

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page three

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

READ

Tuesday, January 26, 1971 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

-JAMES WECHSLER-
in

Ills

_ i IjI

news briefs
By The Associated Press
PRESIDENT FERDINAND MARCOS yesterday called for a
"democratic revolution" in the Philippines in order to change
and revivify its society.
The alternative to an immediate cure, he said, would be the
country's swamping in a flood of reforms.
The city of Manila had been tense for the past week, fearing:
conflict between police and youths who have advocated sweeping re-
forms in the Philippines along Communist lines.
Marcos outlined his programs for ru'al electrification and land
reform and expressed hope that a constitutional convention this sum-
mer would produce a blueprint for the peaceful transformation of the
country.
* * *I

Nun must testify
in Berrigan trial
HARRISBURG, Pa. Ufig - A Roman Catholic nun named
as a co-conspirator in an alleged kidnap plot was yesterday
granted immunity from prosecution and ordered to testify
before a federal grand jury probing the case.
U.S. District Court Judge R. Dixon Herman told Sister
Jogues Egan that "no information can be used against you
unless it involves perjury. This court will protect you."
The 52-year-old nun, now living in New York City, had
balked at testifying after.the jury indicted six persons, three
of them Catholic priests, and named seven coconspirators,
including Sister Jogues.
The government said they were involved in a plot to
kidnap presidential adviser Henry Kissinger on Feb. 22 and
blow up the heating systems of five government buildings
in Washington, D.C.

em um w
e

UGANDAN ARMY dissidents yesterday claimed the over-
throw of President Milton Obote and warned other governments
not to interfere.:
The announcement came over Radio Uganda as Obote was head-
ing home from the Commonwealth summit in Singapore. Landing in
nearby Nairobi, Kenya a few hours later, Obote established contact
with the capital, associates said.
"The army takes over power and warns all foreign countries to
keep their noses out of Uganda's internal affairs," said the Uganda SISTER JOGUES EGAN embraces Rev. Joseph Wenderoth after
broadcast. It made the victory claim after 12 hours of fighting with a.n
a rial actin o th armd frcesin hic an ndeermied um- a federal judge ruled she must testify before a grand jury onan
a rival faction of the armed forces in which an undetermined num- alleged plot to kidnap a presidential adviser and bomb govern-
ber of persons were reported killed. ment buildings.
Obote, who has run Uganda's government for nine stormy years -._
and survived one assassination attempt, was accused of permittingi
corruption in his regime, ignoring army demands for better living GROPPI CASE:
conditions and'giving top government jobs to favored friends.

-
l
E
i

* *

0
7 "Ilk ! t 17 7 1

THE APOLLO 14 ASTRONAUTS yesterday were pronounced ri l l L 0 1
physically fit to fly to the moon, as the six-day countdown was
started.
Space agency d6ctors examined astronauts Alan Shepard, Jr.,
Edgar Mitchell, and Stuart Rossa for four hours and found no medi-o
cal problems.
Countdown ends at 3:23 p.m. Sunday when the Saturn 5 blasts WASHINGTON (') - The
off toward the moon. Shepard and Mitchell are to land in a rough Supreme Court yesterday guaran-j
highland area on Feb. 5 for a 331/2 hour stay, during which they will teed all criminal defendants the
deploy a nuclear-powered science station and hopefully collect rocks right to seek trial in a community
dating back 4.6 million years. that is not prejudiced against
them.
The ruling came in an 8-1 deci-
THE RENEGOTIATIONS BOARD yesterday reported that sion that upset the conviction of
it found space and defense contractors overcharging the federal the Rev. James Groppi for resist-
government by nearly $33.6 million during fiscal 1970. ing arrest during a civil rights
The board, a federal agency charged with eliminating excessive march in Milwaukee in 1967.
profits on such contracts, said that the amount was the highest over- The priest had been active it
chare ttalin adecde.the civil rights movement, and he
contended the jury at his triaJ4
Citing 123 instances of overcharging, the board said that in 68 would reflect community preju
cases contractors made voluntary refunds, while the 55 other con- dice reainst hmm
tractors were ordered to refund the excessive profits, His plea for a change of venue
The 33 per cent increase in excessive profits since 1969 reflects was rejected out of hand, however
the most active period of Vietnam procurement buildup, the board because resisting arrest is a mis-
said, and added that determinations next year could be even higher. demeanor in Wisconsin.
Justice Potter Stewart, speaking
for the court, said Groppi should
ROGERS MORTON (R-Md) yesterday asserted his dedica- have had a chance to prove poten-
tion to environmental protection as a Senate committee deliber- tial prejudice.
ated his nomination as Interior Department head. Groppi. reached in Montrea,
The Maryland congressman is expected to receive committee and where he had a speaking engage-
final Senate confirmation, despite the refusal of the president of a ment, said he is very happy with
well-known environmentalist group to endorse him. the decision. He said he thinks
Phillip S. Berry, head of the Sierra Club, testified that Morton his profession and white skin
had failed to support several environmental protection causes in Con-; played a part in the fact that m
gress, and also questioned the propriety of Morton's connections withsthotfa sln-
the oil industry. The case was returned to M1e-'
the il ndusry.Waukee, where Groppi will be en-

't assures

U.S. Attorney Guy Goodwin has
indicated the grand jury has not
completed its investigation of the
alleged conspiracy and reported
more people might be indicted.
The judge told Sister Jogues,
in ordering her to testify, that the
grand jury also was inquiring in-
to interstate transportation of ex-
plosives, traffic contraband, a n d
destruction of federal property.
There was no further amplifica-
tion of this comment. ,
The six defendants, headed by
imprisoned antiwar priest, T he
Rev. Philip Berrigan, have denied
the charges, calling them a gov-
ernment attempt to end opposi-
tion to the Vietnam war.
They insisted in statements that
their efforts to change the direc-
tion and tone of government have
always been nonviolent.
Herman, in rejecting Sister
Jogues' plea to remain silent, or-
dered her to appear before t h e
grand jury when it resumes taking
testimony tomorrow.
She appeared before the jury
on Jan. 15 and invoked the Fifth
Amendment, refusing to testify on
grounds of possible self incrim-
ination.
Her lawyer argued for a delay
on the immunity issue until it
could be decided by the U.S. Su-
preme Court.
The judge rejected the plea.

'Police hunt
dog, feared
to be rabid
Ann Arbor police are looking
for a one year-old German Shep-
herd dog which bit a man I a.s t
Friday. The dog described as thin
featured and wearing a red col-
lar bit Burton Brody near Church
St. and Willard St. The incident
happened at noon.
If the German shepherd is not
found, Brody will have to undergo
shots to protect him from rabies.
Brody said the dog was not pro-
voked and because of this, he
suspects the dog was rabid. -
If the dog can not be located or
if it is found to be rabid, Brody
will have to undergo a series of
innoculations against the disease.
These shots are very painful and
are only given if the suspected ani-
mal is not found within a short
period of time.
An information concerning the
dog should be given to the police.
Only one person infected by
rabies has been known to survive.
The recent case involved a boy
who was bit by a rabid bat.

venue right
titled to a hearing on his prejudice
claims if the state tries to reopen
the prosecution.
In another ruling, the Supreme
Court said employers may not au-
tomatically refuse to hire women
with small children if they hire
men in the same situation. The
unsigned opinion said job appli-
cations from mothers can be
turned down only if "conflicting
family obligations" are shown to
affect their work adversely.
PROP
Nixon wc
WASHINGTON (A) - The
Democrats' social uplift pro-
gram of the 1960's, the Great
Society, could largely be wiped
out under President Nixon's re-
organization and revenue-shar-
ing projects which he calls a
"new American Revolution."
If the President has his way
with Congress, the Great Society
programs launched by President
Lyndon Johnson would lose

OSES WELFARE PLAN
rnts new revolution'

mm.....- m........m.........m..................,..-
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* Mail to: MUSKET, Michigan Union, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104 ,
! (Please enclose a self-addressed stamped envelope) !
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Wednesday, Feb. 17 8 p.m. $3.25 _.
! Thursday, Feb. 18 8 p.m. $3.25
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Phone 764-0558

RADICAL FILM SERIES
PRESENTS
Kon Ichikawa's
FIRES ON THE PLAIN

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University off
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
,igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor.
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer- '
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
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Summer Session published Tuesday
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their identity, a major part of
their special mission for the
poor, and much of their ear-
marked money.
Under the plan, the model
cities program, of which Ann
Arbor is a part, would lose both
its mission of concentrated slum
renewal and most of its $575
million appropriation.
The Office of Economic Op-

i

t

portunity, for example, would
eventually disappear. Its 1,000
community - action programs
would be consigned to the new
Department of Community De-
velopment and its neighborhood
health centers shifted to the
proposed Department of Human
Resources.
The Human Resources Agen-
cy-a renamed and inflated
Department of Health, Educa-
tion and Welfare-would take
over also the numerous man-
power-training projects that
started in the last decade, ac-
cording to administration of-
ficials who briefed newsmen on
the President's State of the
Union proposals.
The plethora of special-pur-
pose or categorical education-
aid programs of the 1960's would
be lumped into a general edu-
cation fund under the Nixon
blueprint to allow more flexible
state and local spending.

This move to block grants,
education experts believe, would
inevitably dilute the special
mission of such programs as the
$1.3 billion plan for improving
the schooling of poor children.
Under the block-grant-reve-
nue sharing plan, President Nix-
on said, "the federal government
will provide the states and lo-
calities with more money and
less interference-and by cut-
ting down the interference the
same amount of money will go a
lot further."
Nixon, hoping to spearhead a
campaign to gain support for
these proposals, met yesterday
with Republican congressional
leaders in the first of a week-long
series of briefings.
Nevertheless the majority
Democrats are expected to modi-
fy and perhaps largely thwart
dismantling of the Great So-
K~ciety.

TUES. JAN. 26
Alice's Restaurant
Alice Lloyd Hall

WED. JAN. 27
Canterbury House
330 Maynard

ADMISSION 75c
7, 9, 11 P.M.
/ Magic House Family

I

1il

FOR LUNCH OR DINNER
# at
BEST STEAK HOUSE
SIRLOIN-1.53 .
FILET-1i.59
PORK CHOP-.39''
*with Baked Potato, Salad, & Texas Toast
STEAKBURGER-.79
with Baked Potato & Texas Toast
217 S. STATE ST.
(NEXT TO STATE THEATRE)

9

I

1.

U

"''ll'flIt7
.a.a
IS THE MOST
MOVING, THE MOST
INTELLIGENT, THE MOST
HUMANE - OHTO HELL
WITH IT! - IT'S THE
BEST AMERICAN FILM
I'VE SEEN THIS YEAR!"
-VINCENT CANBY, N.Y. TIMES

For the student body:
FLARES
by
SLevi
SFarah
SWright
* Tads

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