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January 26, 1971 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, January 26, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, January 26, 1971

i
a

Ochs and company:
Kick out thejams
By RICHARD LEHFELDT anist in the group, a lanky fel- bourine on which he was equal-
low who sported a dashing black ly virtuous. The lyrics, all of
Wel. I guess it was jus on T-shirt with a white skull on them in the same vein as the
They were selling t-shirts. They the back of it. He also sported succinct title, s a i d something
were selling newspapers. They a stunning New Y o r k accent very powerful about the state
w e r e handing out leaflets. As which made me very homesick. of America today. The group
9 o'clock approached (The con- What can one say about a song exited amidst a flurry of snores
cert was supposed to start at 8.) like Chicago except that it real- and hisses.
The leaflets magically began to ly hit the spot -- Is heavy beat, William Kunstler, after brief-
change I n t o magificent paper its one chord, its innovative use ly talking about the various con-
airplanes. The emcee (no, no, of two-part harmony, its pow- spiracy trials currently taking
that's the wrong word . . . erful political m e s s a g e .. . place in the United States, made
sensing the restlessness of the why, the words even rhymed, a strong plea for young people
crowd, took to the podium to tell and what more could one ask to turn out in force at these
us that Don Sutherland h a d for? trials to demonstrate their soli-
missed his plane and w o u1 d The second song, Free John darity with the defendants. He
therefore not be appearing. Sinclair (Right n o w). demon- forcefully chided what he saw as
The moderator (ah yes, that's strated new depths of musical the increasing political apathy
the word) was promptly replac- maturity. This song actually has on campus, ending with a Julius
ed by a sort of rock group (de- two chords, but the musicians Lester poem about the need for
scribed by the gentleman in seemed not in the least bit phas- all revolutionaries in the coun-
front of me as "super freaks") ed by this extraordinary com- try to consolidate their forces
which played a brief set that plexity; perhaps they even wel- and keep together. Kunstler
will no doubt be remembered comed it. One thing is certain: looked slightly stooped, tired,
here in Ann Arbor f o r many this group does not dabble in maybe even aged, as he ended
years to come. A. J. Weberman, counter - revolutionary music. his talk, one hand on the po-
the talented cowbell-player of Just look at the words of this dium supporting his weight, the
the group, dashed to the mic- powerful political statement: other raised high in the power-
rophone to tell us the big news: "He's not afraid to live / He's to-the-people salute.
that Bob Dylan was a pig, in not afraid to die / He's not Phil Ochs seemed somewhat
fact a "stoned pig," that he nev- afraid of anything / 'Cause he's out of place, a complicated mix-
er did any benefit concerts, that got nothing to hide." If that ture of styles and credos which
he was counter-revolutionary, isn't poetry, I don't know what he does not seem to have been
that all he did with his money is. able to integrate. Ochs is first
w a s build office buildings in Up Against the Wall Mother- and foremost a protest singer, at
New York City, etc. Worse than fucker ended this magnificent least historically, and thenro-
that, "nobody can relate to his set. This was indubitably the test song is virtually a thing of
poetry" because of the h a r d most experimental of the songs he past. I'm Going to Say It
drgimgrysn ateprmna o h og; Now and I Ain't a Marchin' Any
heogen of ebermans onehad no chords more had a pure and nostalgic
analysis was matched by t h e at all, the pianist having for- appeal to the audience, although
mi,.al . rtise of the three saken his instrument for a tam- See KICKING, Page 7

HER MONOGRAM
in Sterling Silver
Campus Jewelers
N. University
ANN ARBOR

Coming to Ann Arbor
a professional singer of folk-rock-blues; known in Detroit for
his widely heralded performances at the Poison Apple
JIM FREEMAN
at

BIMBO'S

in Ann Arbor

A RARE O PPORUNITY!

Shakes eare's
TIMON OF ATHENS

at 8 p.m.-Wednesday-Saturday, January 27-30
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE-Box Office Opens 12:30, 764-5387
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS
OPENS WEDNESDAY-TICKETS NOW!

MODERN VERSION:
Players to stage Timon

PKnT^lTw TI r

l

I1

University Players will present
Shakespeare's Timon of Athens
Wednesday through Saturday
evenings, January 27-30. This is
a unique opportunity for Michi-
gan audiences to see one of
Shakespeare's lesser - known
plays.
Timon of Athens is subject to
considerable scholarlyhspecula-
tion. It is beligved to have been
written about 1607, but there is
no evidence that it was ever per-
formed during Shakespeare's
lifetime.
The story concerns Athens of
the post-Periclean Age. It is an
age, much like our own-neither
as good nor as bad as its critics
argue. But it is seen through the
eyes of Timon, a rich and gener-
ous man whose friends d&sert
him as his money runs out.
Timon's reactions are as ex-
treme as are his human experi-
ences. From the host of Athens,
he retreats to a cave, where he
creates an indictment of tnan-
kind, personified in his own se-
clusion. He rejects anyone who
approaches him, even the ban-
ished Alcibiades, who plans to
take Athens by siege to avenge
both himself and Timon. But
Tinion dies alone, bitter, and
S limIT Dr1T

leaving on his tomb a curse to
those who pass by.
'U' Players will employ a com-
bination of the Elizabethan tra-
dition of staging and the modern
d r e s s and characterization.
Much of the excitement of the
production stems from this
translation to *the modern era
which serves to underline the
similarities between the men of
Shakespeare's Timon and to-
day.
Performances will be at 8 p.m. in
Trueblood Theatre. The box of-
fice will be open for advance
sale on Monday and Tuesday
from 12:30 - 5:00 p.m., and
Wednesday - Saturday f r o m
12:30-8:00 p.m.
LAST 3 DAYS
ENDS THURSDAY

songs which his group then pro-
ceeded to perform. T h e first,
called Chicago;rwas sung with
passion and volume by the pi-

, -
;;
. ;.; ;:r r.;

Beverly Sills
COLORATURA SOPRANO - "Opera's new Superstar "

NEWSWEEK

in HILL AUDITORIUM
SAT., JAN. 30, 8:30 P.M.
PROGRAM: Songs by Richard Strauss and Milhaud; arias from 9 operas
by Handel, Massenet, Rossini, Bellini and Donizetti.
Tickets: $7:00 - $6.50 - $6.00 - $5.00 - $3.50 - $2.50
AND
The Festival Winds
Nine extraordinary performers on woodwinds in a program of music of
Beethoven, Gounod, Handel, and Elliot Carter.
TUES., FEB. 2 8:30 P.M.
in RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
TICKETS: $5.00 - $4.00 - $2.50
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER, ANN ARBOR
Office Hours: Mon. through Fri. 9 to 4:30; Sat., 9 to 12 (Tel. 665-3715)
(Also at Auditorium box office 11/ hours before performance titne.)

lvi

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INFORMATION 781 0700

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OPENS TONIGHT!

ADMISSION $2.50

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