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January 24, 1971 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sunday, January 24, 1971
FALL SEMESTER-ISRAEL
r Brandeis University, The Jacob Hiatt Institute
STUDY IN JERUSALEM, ISRAEL
JULY-DECEMBER, 1971
(40 students from 25 universities enrolled in 1970)
* JUNIORS AND SENIORS ELIGIBLE
4 0 FOUR COURSES-Hebrew not required-Earn
16 credits
0 COST: $2000-Tuition, room, board, round-trip
travel-Some financial aid available
WRITE TODAY for information-Application deadline March 1st
THE HIATT INSTITUTE
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 02154

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

I--

MACROBIOTIC, VEGETARIAN
and
HEALTH FOOD COOKBOOKS
ato
Cirele Bookshop

769-1583

215 S. STATE STREET

2nd Floor

°--

71

V

J

'Si

.7

1k

1l

-Daily-Terry McCarthy
Discuss bust
Two persons from the Argus house discuss police raid at a press
conference yesterday.
9 HOUSES FOLD:
Greeks face future

'U' rocket laiiuicliigs
delayed byweather
By TED STEIN
Bad weather and atmospheric conditions have delayed
until later in the month the launch of two Nike-Apache
"sounding" rockets from the University's Keweenaw Rocket
Launch Site near Copper Harbor, Michigan.
When conditions are suitable, however. the two 1570-
pound, 28-foot rockets will lift off from the upper peninsula
launching site on the eastern tip of the Keweenaw peninsula
on Lake Superior. Dr. Harold Allen of the University's- engi-
nieering college will supervise the launchings.
The entire operation is being
carried out under an agreement
reached last October with the Na- -ua
tional Aeronautics and Space Ad-A r r id
ministration (NASA). The Uni-
versity constructed a launch pad,
installed an experimental ground
based antenna system, andi set up
range safety procedures under the ,r
agreement. p"it aI
NASA was provided the rock-
ets and scientific payloads, the
rocket launcher a n d handling In their second news conference
equipment as well as telemetry re- since their house was raided by
ceiving equipment for the site. Ann Arbor and State police Tues-
Professor Fred Bartman, Direc- day, members of the Ann Arbor
tor of the University's High Alti- Argus collective yesterday dis-
tude Engineering Lab, explained cussed their future plans and their
the twofold aim of the project. version of Tuesday's incident.
"If this is correct, a measure- While opinions were similar to
ment of the conditions of the ion- those expressed at their Thursday
osphere in northern latitudes, such conference, a joint statement ela-
as temperature, composition and borated their opinion that the
density, will be instrumental in raid was politically motivated.
Ipredictingheating anomalies In Members of the collective said
the future. he said.n they believed that police were pri-
paThisay infrati bwould be manly interested in breaking up
practically valuable because of the the group's political organization.
role of anomalous heating in Te ie lee ttmnsb
breaking down strong winds cir- Theycited alleged statements by
culating around the North pole,, police that those arrested tere
according to Bartman. , embers of the WhitePanther
Scientists know that these sys- Party.
tems then creep down over the While the collective and its pa-
northern continents bringing bad per, the Ann Arbor Argus. were
weather with them to the United once closely affiliated with the
States. Pa'nthers, only one of those ar-
The second aim of the launch rested during the raid. Doug Con-
involves communications. nelley, calls himself a member of
T h e heating anomalies which the party.
affect the weather also interfere Police say the only objective of
with long distance surface-to- the raid, in which 12 were arrested
surface and surface-to-air signals. and five eventually charged on
An increased knowledge of atmos- various narcotics offenses, was to
pheric conditions will lead to new jail "pushers" of drugs in the city.
ways of avoiding such troublesome Meanwhile all those charged
interference. were out of jail on bond yesterday.

(Continued from Page 1)

recommendations" required by theI

sup-

41

RECORD

SALE

2 DAYS ONLY
ALL RECORDS

year people felt it necessary to many sororities.
succeed otherwise they'd be let- In a trend against the more
ting the members down." noticeable one towards the closure
He mentioned the Jewish frater- of chapters a third black sorority
nities as an example. "Not one of formed on campus last year, Phi
those houses rushed, the 'in' thing P Gamma Ro.
to do was not to make the effort, PiGmaR oe o aeis
The also failed to maintain tieff own house, however, of the three
iblack fraternities only Kappa Al-
with eirhalumni - which was pha Psi does. Kappa Alpha Psi
suicidal," he says, along with Omega Psi Phi and
Wendy Haime, president of Al- Alpha Phi Alpha have remained
pha Epsilon Phi says that houses members of IFC'
went out of business because. And Chi Omega president Beth
"they didn't accommodate quick- Morris predicts, "Possibly a lot of
ly enough to many new demands
and they became irrelevant." houses will go off campus but
Pat Anderson, rush counsellor there will always be some people
for Kappa Kappa Gamma says who'll want the large, close kind
that, "Panhel has finally realized of living a sorority or fraternity
its function is to aid the houses offers."
in getting as many pledges as pos-
sible. Their previous rush proce-
dures did nothing to help this." 'GE'
Morrison says that IFC's 'ole as
a forum of communication be-
tenfraternities and a loboyist D avid s:
of ideas and representative to the 1 ad
University and alumni has been
helped by recent events. (continued from Page 1)
While individual fraternities and month. Objects reported missing'
sororities are redefining their role range from purses to valuable of-
on campus by stressing philan- fice equipment. A rare book and
thropic projects, political action, a tapestry, each valued at $20,000,
education and community services. were stolen but later recovered.
Panhellenic Association and IFC The source of the thefts, accord-
are also finding new roles. ing to Davids, is not within the
Black fraternities and sororities University community. "It's a
have traditionally been noted for problem of off-campus people," he
their stress on philanthropic ac- says. "The campus is so inter-
tivity directed towards Ann Ar- related with the city that young
bor's black community. vandals come in from outside."
Black sororities withdrew from Davids is reviewing the San-
Panhellenic after a dispute in- ford Security operations and is
volving the practice of "binding considering measures to cut down
vvgt - the number of thefts, he reports.
1_He suys he will soon be repared

TTING ACQUAINTED'
)verseeing 'U' safety

REG.

SALE

3.25

3.95

4.75

2.o99
3,49
4.29
4.99
5.98
6.98

There will not necessarily be
more guards, Davids adds, "but
guards would have added respon-{
sibilities and better training. I
don't think all of the guards have
been properly insrtucted."
In his capacity as a University
liason to law enforcement agen-
cies, Davids works primarily with
the Ann Arbor police department,
which receives financial support
from the University.
The city police are the "first
proper contact" for law enforce-
ment on campus, Davids says.
"They are free to come-we expect
them and want them."
Relations between the University
and the city police are "excel-
lent," says Davids. He rates the

5.50

6.50

7.50

For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
Farah
Wright
Tads
* Sebring
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

Late registration for HAP
Studio and performing workshops
at Hillel, 1429 Hill St.
Dance Workshop-Tuesday,
January 26, 8:30 p.m.
String and Wind Ensemble-Thursday,
January 28 at 7:30 p.m.
Jewelry and Metal Craft-Thursday,
January 28, 7:30 p.m.
Drawing and Painting-Thursday,
January 28 at 7:30 p.m.
For further info. Call 663-4129

to recommend changes involving
an "upgrading of security."

department as being "progressive,
not steeped in the past."
"The force is willing to try new
and innovative efforts to bring
about change,' he says. "The name
of the game today is change."
Davids says he has had little
occasion to come into contact with
Washtenaw County Sheriff Doug-
las Harvey. However, he says, "1
have no qualms about being able
to work with him. My background
with the state police will enable
me to hold my own on what is and
what isn't proper."
Commenting further on his ex-
perience with the state police,
Davids says, "I've been from the
trooper level to head of the de-
partment. My work has acquainted
me with many other people. You
should know who to turn to-then
if you can't handle it, you know
somebody who can."
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