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January 24, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, January 24, 19-1 1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, January 24, 1971

From then 'til now --
Cage in sequence

COME TO
TOWN and COUNTRY
RESTAURANT
Fine Food
Chops, Steaks, & Shrimp
Soul Food Home Cooked
Open Pit Barbeque
-Open-
6 a.m. till 9 p.m.-Mon.-Thurs.
6 a.m. till 3 a.m.-Fri.-Sot.
8 a.m. till 7:30 p.m.-Sunday
730 NORTH MAIN
Deliver and Coternq
769-2330

n,

Buy Your YEARBOOK
MCIANENSIA6

(Continued from Page 2)
phasis is more to the moment
than in serial music, but each
moment is a serially "musical"
moment. Of particular interest
is the constant chromaticism, in
some ways suggestive of a con-
tinuous jazz form, in the sec-
ond piece of the set.
Not enough can be said of
Cage's prepared piano works.
They are beautiful in sound and
organization and are- always as
pleasant as at f i r s t listening.
Some of these sounds are un-
usually subtle in contrast.
"Bacchanale" (1938), Cage's
first prepared piano work, ori-
ginally commissioned as a dance
work, is as boisterous as the
title might suggest. This is not
as aurally refined as some of
the later prepared piano works,
but it is extremely enjoyable.
It is impossible to describe
verbally the effect of this mu-
sic. The album is the only really
obvious solution.
"The Perilous Night" (Winter
1943-44) is of particular inter-
est for the variety and subtlety
of the prepared sounds. Cage,
in this piece, had constructed a
virtual orchestra from this one
instrument. Some of the sound
repetitions, particularly when
timbral quality is emphasized,
are wonderful. .
"Tossed as It is Untroubled"'
(1943), "A Valentine Out of
Season" (1944), and "Root of an
Unfocus" (1944) belong togeher
in description: each piece de-
velops some characteristic of
the prepared instrument. "Root

of an Unfocus" deserves separ-
ate mention for its strident re-
petitive sounds. It seems dif-
ficult to believe this piece has
been produced with no reference
to some manipulative technique
(tape manipulation or electronic
sound generation). Here Cage
deserves as much credit for the
invention of the sound as for
the organization.
More pleasant listening than
any other pieces of this collec-
tion are "Two Pieces" (1946)
for piano. Cage has stated that
he believes his music should fol-
low the Zen tenet of preparing
an atmosphere for the reception
of divine influences., In t h i s
case, Cage has seemingly pro-
vided both the atmosphere and
the influence. The sounds of
these pieces are placed at a fai.
distance from one another. The
context, however, is still strict-
ly sequential.
"Suite for Toy Piano" (1948)
is a piece which seems extremely
conscious of the music-box
sound characteristic of this in-
strument. This influence m a y
also be seen in a piano work
written the same year,
"Dream". Here Cage explores
similar relationships as those
available to the toy piano, only,
of course, on an instrument with
a greater range and a dif-
ferent timbral characteristic.
In short ,this two record set
contains some of the more in-
teresting contemporary music
available written by a composer
who is already considered one
of the greater influences in this
twentieth century art.

H

1l
fi,

at your favorite bookstore
ON SALE NOW AT:

Chicago
III
DOUBLE ALBUM
$5.77
A HI-FI BUYS
RECORD SPECIAL

III

FolI letts
Slaters
Ulrichs

Al.

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University Cellar.
$7.00 'til Jan. 31

Mon., Jan. 25, 7-9 p.m.; students must
have written permissionsfromformer
DAILY OFFICIAL instructor, and sign up in German
Dept. office, 1076 Frieze Bldg. by noon,
BULLETIN Jan. 26: Rooms: Germ. 101 in 3008
ers in 3504 FB,
::>:;>: ":": ;,;; t If you wish to do your teaching Fall
Term: Report to the Secondary Direct-
SNAJANUARY 24, 1971 ed Teaching Ofe., rip. 2292, SEB, no
s ,4,- later than Jan. 25, to pick up nec. Info
DayCal e daand materials; plan to attend one-hour
meeting either at 4:30 p.m. or 7 p.m..
y Jan. 26, Schorllng Aud,, SEB.
Family Recreation Program: for fa- -._hnA ,E
culty, staff and married studentsl In- FOREIGN VISITORS
tramural Sports Bldg., 1:30 p.m. Following person can be reached
DIO~ DAY JAUARY25, 971 through the Foreign Visitor Div., Rnms.
MONDAY, JANUARY 25, 1971 22-24, Mich Union,n764-2148: F a b i an
Donkor, Univ. Coll, for Cape C o a s t,
High Energy Seminar: R. Feynman, Ghana. Jan. 25-Feb. 28.
Calif. Inst. of Tech., "The Q u a r k f__
Model," P&A Colloquium Rm., 4 .ls. SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICES
Prog. In American Culture: R. Coles. 212 S.A.B. (lower level)
Harvord Med. Sch., "Concept of White Interview. Applications and details
Racism," Rackham Lect. Hall, 4 p.m. available at SPSP, phone or apply in
Computer, Info and Control Engi- person for interview appt.
neering: S. Csibi, "On Convergent Iter- Jan. 25. Camp Wabikon, Canadian,
ation PFrocesses in Machine Learning," coed. Will be here from 9-5, openings
1504 EE, 4 p.m. include gen. counselors and specialists
-r (Continued on Page 10)

HI-Fl BUYS
Ann Arbor-East Lonsino

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General Notices
Make-up final exams for German.
101, 102, 111, 231, 232, and 236 given
10% off
EVERYTHING
NOW at NOW
Student Book Service

For the student body:
* Genuine
Authentic
Navy
PEA COATS

STATE STREET
FRATERN ITI ES,

8:30 P.M.-Hill Auditorium

i1#
'i
!f

Beta Theta Pi
604 S .State

Chi Psi
620 S. State

p

Theta Delta Chi
700 S. State

SKI
Alpine Valley
Every Wednesday nite
SIGN-UP
Tues. 7:15
Union Assembly Room
7r call
663-2277

$25

I

Sizes 3 4 to 46

JANUARY 24-29

State Street at Liberty

FALL

ORENTATION

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Ann Arbor's Newest Picture Framers
Innovative Framing, Reasonably Priced, Done by
Experienced Framers and Conservators.
FINE CONTEMPORARY MOULDINGS a DRY MOUNTING
RESTORATION 0 20% ARTISTS DISCOUNT
ONE WEEK SERVICE
MEGAFRAMES
217 N. Main St.
(across from Post Office)
769-9420
Monday-Sturday 10-5 Monday Evening 7-9

WANTS

A0

YOU!

Sign up NOW for
FALL Orientation
Leader Interviews

Entertainment and speeches by performer PHIL OCHS; actor DON SUTHERLAND, star of M*A*S*H;
and WILLIAM KUNSTLER, defense attorney for Sinclair, Plamondon, and Forrest, as well as for the
Berrigan Brothers, and the East Coast Conspiracy to Save Lives. (Tickets are $2.50, $3.00, and $3.50.
Available at Fishbowl, Union, and at the door.)

'at

UA& OFFICES, 2nd floor Union

The rest of LIFE CULTURE WEEK was re-scheduled in s u pp o r t of the.AFSCME
workers. Here is the revised schedule:

INTERVIEWS: JANUARY 25-29

Mon., Jan. 25

THE PROGRAM IN AMERICAN CULTURE

THE CIA CONSPIRACY TRIAL
Rm. 126 East Quad-8:30 p.m.

presents a

FIVE-PART LECTURE SERIES

I Tues., Jan. 26

entitled

CRISIS IN AMERICAN VALUES

DRUGS IN ANN ARBOR-8:30 p.m.
Michigan Union Assembly Hall, Basement
WAR CRIMES, THE CIA, THIRD WORLD
LIBERATION MOVEMENTS, AND THE
PEOPLE'S PEACE TREATY

Wed., ian. 27

MONDAY, JANUARY 25

Rackhom Lecture Hall-4 P.M.

"CONCEPT OF WHITE RACISM"
ROBERT COLES

Michigan Union Ballroom-twice-7:00 &
$1.00 admission charge at door

9:30 p.m.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1

Rackham Lecture Hall-4 P.M.

"PROSPECTS FOR AN AMERICAN INTELLIGENTSIA"
EUGENE GENOVESE

T 28 NEW LIFE NIGHT-Hill Aud.-8:30 p.m.
Tickets are $1.50, available at the Fishbowl, at the
Michigan Union, and Thurs. at the door

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9

Rackham Lecture Hall-4 P.M.
"PROSPECTS FOR RELIGION"
AAADTIK AAADTV

mi

M^l 1 N /Vt'%A1

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