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January 24, 1971 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-24

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page thiree

41
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FOR TICKETS, CONTACT THE MUSKET
OFFICE, TELEPHONE 763-1 134
MAIL ORDER FORM WILL BE PRI NTED
IN TUESDAY'S MICHIGAN DAILY.

9..4P

£Izdligatn

43 tti1y

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Sunday, January 24, 1971

...

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

I

Ni
neows briefs
By The Associated Press #

De ms criicize

Nixon

speech

PRESIDENT FERDINAND .E. MARCOS of the Philippines,
is expectd to announce a new policy toward the Communist bloc
in his State of the Nation address Monday.
Leftist students have called for a rally outside Congress at +
the same time. The scheduling of the rally has made Manila tense t ."
because of the possibility of a violent confrontation between demon-
strators and police. Students hurled bottles and stones at Marcos as
he and his wife emerged from Congress after the State of the Nation
address last year.-
In view of last year's violence, 50 schools around the Congress
area have suspended classes for Monday to "avoid injury and vio-
lence to students," the Department of Education said. Police are also
guarding all American oil firms and hunting suspects who hurled fire
bombs or set off dynamite at the headquarters of the Esso and k
Caltex companies, killing one man. i
THE SOUTH AFRICAN GOVERNMENT announced yesterday
that it will try the Anglican dean of Johannesburg on charges
of subversive activities.
-Associat
The Very Rev. Gonville ffrench-Beytagh, a British subjectAAasftr
was taken into custody by security police Wednesday night. The
dean is an outspoken critic of South Africa's racial discrimination. Cambodians leave the area of Phnom Penh yesterday fo
He is the latest of nine clergymen of various denominations - all the attack on the Cambodian capital's airport.
opposed to government policy - to suffer government action since ----
the beginning of 1970. W 4" " r

- President Nixon's broad proposals for Cabinet over-
haul and revenue sharing face a long, hard struggle in Con-
gress with slim chance of success. Prospects seem brighter for
some sort of welfare reform and health care legislation.
The President's six-point program presented in Friday
night's State of the Union speech continued to receive muted
responses yesterday from many Democrats, praising the gen-
eral goals while awaiting specifics.
But it seems clear that his proposal to combine seven
existing domestic departments - plus related independent
agencies into four new super- -

AN OIL TANKER ran aground in fog and light snow near
New Haven, Connecticut yesterday, spilling an estimated 386,000
gallons of home heating oil into the channel of New Haven
Harbor.
A Coast Guard spokesman said much of the slick had not been
contained and an outgoing tide was carrying it into Long Island
Sound.
THE SOVIET UNION, has stopped without explanation its
previous buildup of SS9 missiles.
The halt has put the Nixon administration's strategists in an
embarrassing spot as they work on plans to ask the new Congress for
more funds for an antiballistic missile system to defend Minutemen
missiles.;
The SS9's are the nuclear rockets which reportedly could destroy
U.S. Minutemen intercontinental missiles in their silos.;

WAGE DISPUTE:
Milwaukee poliec
home with 'blue f]

MILWAUKEE, Wis. W) - An
estimated 93 to 95 per cent of
Milwaukee's policemen s t a y e d
home from work yesterday in a
"sick call" job action. The action
is a result of a dispute regarding
wages and grievance procedures
which would cut some of the po-
lice chief's disciplinary powers.
The union is demanding a two-
year contract, which the city said

PLANS LEGISLATION
Sen. Case charges CIA with
subsidizing Radio Free Europe

would cost '$11 million.
bring the pay for an ex
patrolman, now $9,700 a
$12,500 immediately an
in the second year.
The city has offered
year package it says it'
million, including a boost
700 a year for experience
men now with an unspe
crease in the second az
years.
Efforts to settle the
continued through the d
ever trustees of the N
Professional Policemen's
tive Association said they
cepted a proposal that
union and the city acc
and binding arbitration.
State highway patrols
over traffic duty on N
County's freeways, freein
man deputy sheriff's sq
and six one-man detecti
vehicles for work on cit
the sheriff's office said.
A spokesman said plan
make all squads two-mar
total of 60 men after nig
The state patrol sai
three dozen officers had
signed to Milwaukee, wo
hour shifts, and the en
man force had been aler
ready if called. There war

.agencies is in deep trouble be-
fore the specifics have been
presented.
At least two potential Demo-
cratic presidential candidates im-
mediately seized on the fact that
the President stressed executive
reorganization rather than more
substantive proposals to deal with
the nation's economic and social
ted Press problems.
"It failed to deal adequately
with the critical problem of un-
liowing employment, it failed to come to
grips with the need to reorder our
._ priorities-and offered instead the
type of reshuffling of the federal
government that is a poor sub-
stitute for action, said Sen. Birch
Bayh, D-Ind.
1 "There wasn't a line in the
J speech for the man who is out of
work," said Sen. Henry M. Jack-
son, D-Wash.
7u ' Democratic National Chairman
Lawrence O'Brien accused Nixon
of ignoring two concerns that
It would "rank above all others", the war
perienced and the economy.
year, to O'Brien, who avoided the war
d $13,000 issue in last fall's campaigning,
said in his statement:
a three- "President Nixon attempted to
worth $7 avoid the painful subject of the
t to $10,- Indochina war by promising to
d patrol- deliver to Congress next month
cified in- a detailed 'State-of-the-World'
n d third message."
O'Brien said the use of air and
dispute sea power to back up the Vietna-
ay. How-
qilwaukee
Protec-
y had ac-
both the
ept final
men took {
Milwaukee
g 24 one- |||| .
uad cars
ve squad
1y streets, r
s were to f<
n units, a
:htfall.
Ed nearly
been as-
rking 12- f -.
tire 375- .
ted to be .
s no words

Arms sale'
ossible to
S., Africa..,
LONDON AJP)-Prime Minister
Edward Heath returned from the
Commonwealth summit confer-
ence yesterday declaring that no-
thing decided by the Common-
wealth ministers tied his hands on
a possible proposal to sell arms to
South Africa.
Conservative party officials ex-
pect the prime minister to an-
nounce in Parliament at least. a
limited sale of maritime weapons
to the South Africans. The action
is expected to raise a stormy re-
action at home and in most of
the Commonwealth.
Former Laborite prime minister
Harold Wilson let go a vitrilic
blast at the proposed arms deal at
the start of what is shaping up as
a double-barreled opposition on-
slaught on the Tories in conjunc-
tion with the government's anti-
strike legislation.
But Heath and his followers be-
lieve they have the full backing
of the electorate in their cam-
paign to halt crippling wildcat
strikes and curb the power of the
trade unions.
Home secretary Reginald Maud-
lin, who sat in for Heath during
the prime minigter's tour of Com-
monwealth capitals stated the ad-
ministration's confidence in a
speech Friday night to a party
rally.
The opposing fury against the
antistrike legislation, Maulding
said "will not impress the public;
at the ballot box they demon-
strated strong support for our
proposals. I do not doubt for cne
minute they would vote in the
same way today."
Officials said Maulding con-
sulted Heath in Singapore before
including that remark in his
speech. Conservative newspapers
promptly interpreted it as a clear
warning to the opposition that the
administration would not hesitate
to call a snap national election
if the opposition to the union leg-
islation becomes intractable in
Parliament.
Heath is facing a four-day-old
nationwide postal strike, which has
halted the mail and tied up teleJ
phone and telegraph communica-
tions.
Still with the Tories' popularity
sinking in the latest opinion polls,
an early electoral confrontation
seemed unlikely.

WASHINGTON (IP) - Sen. Clif- Case said, "the bulk of Radio
ford P. Case (R-New Jersey) Free Europe's and Radio Liberty's
charged yesterday that secret I budgets comes from direct CIA
Central Intelligence Agency sub- subsidies."
sidies have financed most oper- Case called for an end to such
ating costs of Radio Free Europe financing in announcing he will
and Radio Liberty which b e a m introduce legislation Monday to
broadcasts to Communist Eastern bring the two stations under the
Europe. congressional authorization and
Although both claim to be non- appropriation process.
governmental organizations spon- A member of both the Senate
sored by private contributions, I Foreign Relations and Appropria-

tions Committees, Case said tax
returns of the two stations show
combined operating costs of nearly
$34 million for fiscal 1969.
Case claimed from $12 million
to $20 million in free media space
is donated annually to the cam-
paign to raise funds for the sta-
tions. but that "the return from
the public is apparently less than
$10,000" while contributions from
corporations and foundations like-
wise account for only a small por-

tion of their budgets, from the governor's office on more
There was no immediate com- plans to use state forces. L wre
ment from the CIA. "Every effort is being made t L
R E M E M B E R Senate sources reported that avoid disruption of police service mee operati
despite claims by the two stations and so far we've been successful," regarded limi
they are private organizations, said Police Chief Harold Breler. by Nixon an
U.S. government officials assigned Despite the job action, officials reached betw
to the American consulate general said there was no significant rise William Rog
1p in Munich maintain very close in crime in the city, of the Senat
contact with them. The action came less than a The Demo
The sources said one official is week after the end of a six day menting on I
assigned as a full-time liaison to period in which 20,000 New York ganize the go
1 assure their program content con- City policemen refused to work i failed to tak
forms with government policies. a dispute over back pay. questions ofp
PREGN
, York Cit
provide
lilTare an
aeamIZAbortion.
formatio
nancy.']
Koming Soon iod only
your ch
(The Easy-Does-It Band) nancy c
alternat
we have
1. to r. LLOYD BASKIN, LARRY ATAMANIUK, RICHARD GREENE, PETER ROWAN, ANDY KULBERG ice. CO
1-215-87
from Boston cast Ronnie Hawkins Greenbrier Boys, Bill Monroe and Blues Project
of "Hair" Band, Toronto Bill Monroe and the Bluegrass Boys, bass, flute
piano, organ, drums the Bluegrass Boys, Earth Opera
lead vocals Jim Kweskin guitar,
Jug Band lead vocals
violin, viola
Sat., Sun.-J an. 23, 24I
Jim Roberts, lyricsS-2
II
* THE SILENCE T
ALL TOGETHER NOW AS rainTH SDurILNC
dir. INGMAR BERGMAN (1963) FORG
ERRR-LINGRID THULIN and GUNNEL LINDBLOM
IN CONCERT THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 8:30 P.M. H ILL AUD in grim love/hate relationship DE
WITH "The Big Questions do not function in THE SILENCE 1
as excuses for the big ansmers. There is indeed no I
exit in life's aame. but hell is hardly rendered more ..

nce O'Brien

ons in Cambodia dis-
its announced earlier
d the understanding
een Secretary of State
trs and the members
;e.
cratic leader, com-
Nixon's plan to reor-
vernment, said Nixon
:e into account vital
priorities and timing.

PREGNANT? NEED HELP?
ANT? NEED HELP? Abortions are now legal in New
ty up to 24 weeks. The Abortion Referral Service will
a quick and inexpensive end to your pregnancy. We
member of the National Organization to Legalize
n. CALL 1-215-878-5800 for totally confidential in-
on. There are no shots or pills to terminate a preg-
These medications are intended to induce a late per-
.A good medical test is your best 1st action to insure
ance for choice. Get a test immediately. Our preg-
ounseling service will provide totally confidential-
ives to your pregnancy. We have a long list of those
already assisted should you wish to verify this serv-
PY OUR NUMBER FOR FUTURE REFERENCE:
78-5800.

mwmm

IS THEATRE IS OFF LIMITS!
g the engagement of "CAN HEIRONYMUS MERKIN EVER
GET MERCY HUMPPE AND FIND TRUE HAPPINESS?," i
rust advise our patrons that the picture Playboy I
Magazine devoted 10 pages to is
FINITELY NOT FOR EVERYONE!
There are some scenes so explicit, so realistic, I
so natural that
"IT MAKES BLOW-UP' LOOK LIKE
tans me wra in sat E It E w i r ute nurn rIr f f

I

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