100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 23, 1971 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Soturday, JJonuory 23, 197 k I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, January 23, 197 ~'

he go on

forever!

FONDA and
FROINES are Coming!l
Union Ballroom
8 P.M.
January 27
FOR THE PEACE
TREATY CONFERENCE

He
*Koming Soon*
(Al Kooper)
(and so are they)

"ll 71' 11
IS THE MOST
MOVING, THE MOST
INTELLIGENT, THE MOST
HUMANE -OHTO HELL
WITH IT! - IT'S THE
BEST AMERICAN FILM
I'VE SEEN THIS YEAR!"
-VINCENT CANBY, N.Y. TIMES
r m.ae ar saa awwa amrr n
A ME ll|OISRLM
SHOWS TONIGHT AT
7 & 9

..

!, ?

"Your
attention
is riveted.
The director
plays his
little game
with sadness
and
erotocism
in clever
fashion!"
-Withom Wolf,
Cue

I

I

I

slarring .'W
BIBI ANDERSSON
BRUNO CREMER EAsrMANCOLOR
DIAL 8-6416

4

1

lrm v LAW~1

sk-h - - -------------
------------------

Artur Rubinstein gave a piano
recital in Hill Aud. last night.
It is something he has done
many times before, 15 in fact. In
this country he has performed
regularly for some 35 years. His
public career as a pianist began
with this century, which means
that he is beginning his eighth
decade as a performing artist. It
is not a record - the French
pianist Francis Plante gave his
last recital at 94. But it is
something that one responds to
emotionally.
One could also not help being
aware of a whole era of musical
history. Rubinstein's career ex-
tends into the last century. He
knew Joachim as a prodigy and
Saint-Saens as a young rival to
the great pianists of the early
20th century. He was the first
to play Scriabin in the west,
the self appointed mentor of Les
Six and of Villa Lobos. Stravin-
sky and De Falla both dedicated
works to him.
You will tell me that this is
all beside the point, that my
duty is to report on Rubinstein's
playing. I can only say that the
waves of love and respect that
flowed over ontodthe stageat
the end of the concert indicated
More nifty ARTS, Page 6
something of the deeper signifi-
cance of )the evening.
But to get on to matters of
substance, Rubinstein gave us
an entire concert of Chopin,
which included several larger
works, the F Minor Fantasie,
two ballads, and the B Flat
Minor Scherzo and the F Sharp
Minor Polonaise as well as the
Berceuse and a group of waltzes
and preludes. It is the composer
most closely identified with
Rubinstein and the ideal one" to
reveal his extraordinary gifts.
If I say that the unique talent
of Rubinstein is his simplicity,
I fear that it will be equated
with superficiality, or imply that
his playing is without subtlety.
Neither could be less true. It is
the simplicity which comes from
a careful awareness of the over-
all design or architecture of a
piece. It is the ability to set
every detail, ornament and suc-
cessive section of a piece per-
fectly in perspective. It is the
avoidance of any mannered in-

was hypnotic with its reitera-
tion of the pedal against the
melodic line which Rubinstein
deliniated with a singing tone
and curve that no pianist could
match. For once the middle sec-
tion in C Sharp minor did not
sound like an angry intrusion,
but grew out of the first section
naturally.
The most impressive example
of Rubinstein's ability to unify
what in other hands is usually
an episodic work was the Polon-
aise. It begins with the charac-
teristic polonaise rhythm, thick
in texture. There is a secondary
motif in bare octaves reiterated
with only chromatic variety and
a middle section which is really
an extended mazurka. Not an
obviously well-calculated form.
Rubinstein held it together by
the careful dynamic progress
and rhythmic spacing of each
section.

I

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,'
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier. $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail. I

I

ATTENTION:

The Sl-UAC trip to Venezuela
May 5-30 is $160-not $199
as in Fri. Daily. We regret any
inconvenience we may h a v e
caused anyone.

v
r

trusion into the essential struc-
ture of a work, no matter how
delicate or overpowering. It is
also the secret of Rubinstein's
ability to find new insights into
a piece he has played for over
70 years.
All of this was accomplished
with an almost infinite variety
of interpretive and technical
skills. In the Berceuse for ex-
ample, the intricate cantilena
never once intruded 'on the un-
derlying motion of the work, but
was spun out with an incredible
variety of tonal and dynamic
nuance. Such power, rhythmic
momentum, and fury that made
up Rubinstein's performance of
the Polonaise nearly transcend-
ed the instrument's limitations.
Many pieces on the program
w e r e especially well - known
among Chopin's oeuvre, but they
sounded entirely new, almost as
if the pianist were improvising
as he played. The D flat prelude
'a

For those who like to compare
the age of a performer w i t h
the speed of his fingers, and if
the printed program is not
.enough, there was an etude of
Chopin, the Scherzo-Caprice of
Chabrier, Debussy's Poissons
D'or and the Polchinella of Villa
Lobos to marvel at as encores.
They could not have been play-
ed better, except by Rubinstein.
There are a handful of artists
whom one wishes might retain
their powers forever. Rubinstein
may very well manage it.
SAT., JAN. 23
AFTERNOON MATINEE'
CHARLIE CHAPLIN
FEATURE
Vast snow scenes and grippingj
rescues make this Chaplin film
one of his best.
"BRING THE KIDDIES"
75c
1 and 3:05 ARCH.
662-8871 AUD.

THIS IS THE FILM ON WHICH
PLAYBOY
RAN TEN WELL-STACKED PAGES!
"A sort of 'What's NewPussycat?
brought up to today's level!"
Judith Crist, New York Magazine
1
1It~ij nS MERKIN
ever f H m p9
® Prsoa nu not tadmitledThis a rnaiie EImq
bhihracerta,,, ares, check tb.Ne r aw atwi,e.
A Uwvral P"m wsLirtifud ITorahs Copomfc rafti
A qiuai FilemRelase "Tecbica1w j
SUNDAY NIGHT ONLY
RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE
AUDITORIUM
(East Quad)
SHOWN AT 7 & 9:15

__I'
a

10% off
EVERYTHING

ATTENTION

NOW
StudentI

at

NOW

Book Service

I

by -i z-.r a ,Lc ino .i zsrag a t Kn Y A, IRUVK i -V1+ i
This fre1 storring
$1.50 8:0
F RI., SAT., SANBhL'ih
SUN. NEITE
MICHAEL _OWfVI
COONEY AND A STEUAR NEW YORK CAST!
"One doesn't talk about
M.C., one listens to him."
-Mich. Daily
SUN. 2 P.M.
CHILDREN'S
CONCERT
w/ Michael Cooney
1421 Kill STREET
___1VWeO1OFW
.2 4we forgot to order our subscription to
1D.
ER, Don't the Same Mistake
Keep up with all the important news, whether it's from
Pnom Penh, Lansing, Washington, or Angell Hall; Dis-
cover the reasons behind the events; Be informed!
LkND
ner PHIL OCHS, Call our Circulation Dept. and
S H, and WIL- order your
for Sinclair, Pla
igan Brothers.

Coming to Ann Arbor
a professional singer of folk-rock-blues; known in Detroit for
his widely heralded performances at the Poison Apple
JIM FREEMAN
at
BIMBO'S in Ann Arbor
Daily Classifieds Get Results

.1

CINEMA II
Aud. A, Angell Hall
DIAL M FOR MURDER
Friday, Jan. 22
7:00, 9:05
THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN

I

m m

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan