100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 21, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

hii
TONIGHT 75c
Pam (lark
-a local singer with an
exqusite voice and style-
Fri., Sat.,
Sun. Nite
MICHAEL
COONEY
Sun. 2 p.m.
CHILDREN'S
CONCERT
1421 Kill TREET
161A'SI -
..!

Litter doesn't throw
itself away; litter
doesn't just happen.
People cause it-and
only people can prevent,'
It. "People" means you.
Keep America Beautiful.
advertising contributed
for the public good
We're in debt
to
wars,
* floods,
health
services,
e saving
and'
blood banks*
help
usT
The Aerican Red Gss.
aertisingcontributed for the public go

p~age Ido ree

T4C

£irbtitan

an"*lwlwt ly

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Thursday, January 21, 1971 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

ne ws,,.briefs
By The Associated Press

KAMA
THE MOTION PICTURE
KAMA SUTRA SEEN BY
MILLIONS OF MEN AND
WOMEN IN EUROPE
AND ASIA IS NOW
FREE TO BE SHOWN
IN THE [UNITED STATES...
ANSWERS QUESTIONS EVEN A MAN AND
WIFE DON'T DARE ASK EACH OTHER!
COME TO TErE
KAMmA SUTRA
I WANT TO SHOW YOU SOMETHENGI..In col@Pw
s'.rn'BRUNO DIETRCH - PERSIS KHAMBATTA - RICHARD ABBOTT. PREM MATh
FARYAL KARIM.* MAREN KAEHLER - BARBARA SCHONE . FRANZISKA SRONNEN -*MW IRS"
A CONTI-FILM-Produced and Directed by KOBI JAEGER and RICHARD R. RIMME.
Music by IRMIN SCHMIDT . WORLD SALES: Exportfilm Bischoff & Co.

THE GOVERNMENT'S PROBE of an alleged bombing and
kidnap conspiracy apparently stems from testimony of a federal
convict paroled last month.
The Los Angeles Times yesterday identified the convict as Boyd
F. Douglas, 32, and said that he provided the justice department
with information about communications between the Rev. Daniel
F. Berrigan and Sister Elizabeth McAlister, two of the five indicted
in the case.
Justice Department officials, including Atty. Gen. John N.
Mitchel have refused to discuss Douglas' connection to the case. '
Mitchell, the Times reported, has ordered closed information
usually available to the news media, such as Douglas' federal prisont
records.
* * * -
POLISH WORKERS continued slowdowns at the giant Lenin
Shipyards yesterday, demanding economic and political changes.
Reliable sources at the Lenin yards in Gdansk said that men
worked at half pace but that the atmosphere was calmer than on
Tuesday when crews continuously stopped work. City transport also
halted Tuesday when workers struck for four hours.
The yards are a key industry which Poland's new leader, Edward'
Gierek, cannot afford to let stagnate in his already ailing economy.
Secretary of De
THE NORTH CAROLINA SUPREME COURT yesterday ruled
that using state funds to bus urban children to school is con-"
stitutional.Fa ird s
Acting on a suit filed by a group of Winston-Salem taxpayers L
against the State Department of Public Instruction, the high court"
knocked down an injunction which would have prohibited use of tris in
The suit had been seen as a possible barrier to school desegre-
gation plans that required crosstown busing. WASHINGTON (P)-Secret
* * * terday he will continue to advise
BRITONS yesterday withstood the first day of a nationwide china in an effort to "reduce An
postal strike by not writing or by using expensive private mail mains in office.
services. Laird said that U.S. air supp
The strikers promised to maintain "essential" services such as the June invasion by U.S. andE
emergency telegrams and telephone calls to fire brigades, police will continue.
and hospitals. Although the defense secreta
The Post Office stand against its workers corresponds with the new in his statement, his useC
Conservative government's policy to halt big pay increases in its acknowledgement to widened U
battle against inflation. i Cambodian troops fighting theI
NEW CONGRESS CONVENES
Dayni
Democrats. try to end selliri

Trial may violate
Geneva accords
WASHINGTON Up) - The Justice Department may have
violated the Geneva Conventions when it granted immunity
for Paul Meadlo to testify in the My Lai trial of Lt. William
L. Calley.
The Geneva Conventions, one covering civilians in time
of war and one covering prisoners of war, obligate the United
States to prosecute persons alleged to have committed "grave
breaches" of the conventions.
Meadlo, now a civilian living in Terre Haute, Ind., testi-
fied Jan. 11 that he helped kill unresisting villagers in the
March 16, 1968, raid. Calley,
leader of Meadlo's unit, is on
trial by court martial at Ft. Higi1 Court
Benning, Ga., on murder
charges.
To obtain Meadlo's testimony, rles 011
Asst. Atty. Gen. Will R. Wilson,
of the Justice Department's Crim-
inal Division, granted immunity
guaranteeing that his testimony contenipt
would not be used to prosecute
him.

-Associated Press
fense Melvin Laird
orts air
Indochina
ary of Defense Melvin Laird said yes-
using U.S. airpower throughout Indo-
merican casualties" as long as he re-
port has been used in Cambodia since
South Vietnamese forces and that it
Rry tried to suggest there was nothing
of the term "airpower" lent official
.S. support of South Vietnamese and
North Vietnamese in Cambodia.
Unlike his past statements
Laird did not limit his descrip-
tion of air operations in Cambo-
dia to interdiction-the interrup-
tion or destruction of supply and
troop movements
Apparently anticipating new
troubles from antiwar sepators
by as the scope of U.S. air operations
c in Cambodia unfolds, Laird said
B the administration has authority
p from Congress to conduct air and
as sea operations so ing as it does
not commit U.S. ground-combat
troops outside of Vietnam.
ty The dispatch of American heli-
t copters to aid the "allied offen-
e sive" in Cambodia comes six and
a half months after President
- Nixon declared "no U.S. air or
- logistics support" would be used
_ to aid South Vietnamese fighting
- in Cambodia.
y Now, however, U.S. helicopters
- operating for the first time from
r 7th Fleet ships off the Cambo-
dian coast have been providing
w firepower and logistics support-
- ferrying supplies and aiding in
o communications-for the Cambo-
L dian-South Vietnamese force bat-
f tling to repoen the highway to the
sea.

Granting immunity, however
limited, to a person the govern-
ment is obligated to prosecute ap-
pears to violate the treaties, but
a Justice Department official said
he sees no conflict between Wil-
son's action and the Geneva Con-
ventions.
I n an interview, Asst. A t t y .
Gen. William Rehnquist agreed
there might be a violation if the
United States is unable to t r y
former servicement accused in the
My Lai slayings.
In accepting the Geneva Con-
ventions, the United States agreed
to pass laws to provide for pun-
ishing violators. But there is con-
cern now that there may not be
adequate law to cover soldiers in-
volved at My Lai who have since
left the Army and therefore are
no longer subject to military law.
Both conventions specifically
outlaw "willfull killing, torture or
inhuman treatment . . . willfully
causing great suffering or ser-
ious injury to body or health" of
protected persons.
Although no government sources
say so, it is generally thought that
none of the men in this legal gap
will ever be brought to trial.
Robin Hood:
man or myth?
PENKRIDGE, England () -
Charles Wilkes, retired history
schoolmaster, yesterday completed
years of research and concluded
that Robin Hood's name was Alf,
never wore Lincoln green and op-'
erated 50 miles from Sherwood
Forest.
Wilkes contends Robin was Al-
fred de Hunterden, a noble thrown
out of his manor for revolting
against Henry If. He did rob the
rich, but there is some doubt he
ever gave anything to the poor.
And, the schoolmaster said,
there's no use trying to find any
traces of Little John, Will Scarlet
or Friar Tuck. They just weren't,1
he concludes.

WASHINGTON (P) -- The Su-
preme Court decided yesterday
that contempt citations appended
to a defendant's penalties follow-
ing his conviction should be ruled
upon by a second judge.
Justice William Douglas deliver-
ed the unanimous opinion, in
which he did not defend court-
room disruption but instead de-
clared that a Judge "not reviled
by the contemnor" should decide
the contempt issue.
Douglas, who is regarded as the
court's most liberal member, said
it is basic to the Western tradi-
tion that a courtroom be "a hal-
lowed place of quiet dignity as far
removed as possible from the emo-
tions of the street."
The justice denounced court-
room "vulgarity" as he delivered
the opinion condemning a defend-
ant's personal attack on a Penn-
sylvania trial judge.
The defendant, Richard A. May-
berry, on trial before Judge Al-
fred A. Fiok in Allegheny County
Criminal Court in 1966 for a pri-
son break, called the judge "a
dirty sonofabitch" and a "tyran-
nic.,ii<old dog."
Douglas said Judge Fiok, as the
target of Mayberry's insolence, was
not likely "to maintain that calm
detachment necessary for fair ad-
judication."
"A judge, vilified as was this
Pennsylvania judge, necessarily
becomes embroiled in a running,
bitter controversy."~
The contempt should have been
ruled on by "another Judge not
bearing the sting of these slander-
ous remarks and having the im-
personal authority of the law,"
Douglas said.
The ruling struck down M a y-
berry's contempt conviction and
his 11- to 22-year prison sent-
ence.
But it was ambiguous about the
rights of defendants and the
course to be followed by judges
who slap them down for contempt..
"Genera'lizations are difficult"
the justice said in leaving this is-
sue somewhat unsettled.
The ruling did not disturb May-
berry's conviction for prison break
and holding hostages.

i,

WASHINGTON OP) - House
Democrats yesterday weakened
seniority's grip on House power
by forcing entrenched elderly
leaders to give up a number of
subcommittee chairmanships to
younger members.
After more than three hours
of closed door Democratic Cau-
cus debate they approved new
rules requiring that:
-The 21 powerful committee
chairmen may also head only
one of their subcommittees.
-No House member may be
chairman of more than one
legislative subcommittee, word-
ing permitting members to head
more than one subcommittee if
only one is designated as being
legislative.
Some subcommittees are in-
vestigative rather than legisla-
tive.
The maverick actions followed
the promotions of Carl Albert,

(D-Okla) and Hale Boggs, (D-
La.) to speaker and majority
leader.
The two new rules' were the
first of a package, prepared by
a caucus committee, designed to
spread powerful chairmanships
around to more members and
make it easier to oust chairmen.
But a group of young House
liberals pressed for broader re-
form to oust 11 of the present
chairmen in 1973 by barring the
power seats to anyone who is
over 70 or who has been a chair-
man more than eight years.
There was also a move afoot
to elect Democratic whips from
now on rather than appoint
them, since they traditionally
move up to majority leader and
then to speaker.
As Democrats moved to wrap
up a two-day caucus, House
Republicans began theirs. On

the GOP agenda were seniority
reform and a conservative blo
effort to replace Rep. John B
Anderson of Illinois with Rep
Samuel L. Devine of Ohio a
GOP conference chairman.
Democratic whip Boggs woi
.a five-way race for majorit
leader during a marathon eigh
hour closed-door caucus in th
House chamber Tuesday.
Former Majority Leader Al
bert was nominated speaker -
assuring his election to the jot
by the full House Thursday -
by a 220 to 40 vote, opposed b
Rep. John Conyers Jr. of Michi
igan, the first black speake
candidate of modern times.
Conyers said he entered t h
speaker race because Albert re
fused to endorse his drive t
strip all five Mississippi Demo
crats, including the powerfu
Rules Committee Chairman, o
their seniority.

Persons under 18 cannot be admitted

o IFTH FO UM
wWMAdgOWM AT LUUURTY
DOWNTOWN ANN AROOR
INFORMATION 761700
Admission $2.50

Thurs.-7:15 and 9:00
Fri .-7:15, 9:00, 10:45

if

r t

MARTY'S 1st ANNUAL WALL-OF-SLAX

jI :" -- _
1
s

COMING
A HI-FI BUYS
RECORD SPECIAL
JAN. 26, 27, & 28

From the newest and largest trouser stock in town

Entire Stock of 5000 Pair

CHICAGO III f
S 77
5 plus tax
DON'T MISS THIS DOUBLE ALBUM
II-FI. BUYS
Ann Arbor-East Lansing
618 S. Main Phone 769-4700
"Quality Sound Through Quality Eauipment"

Petitioning
Now Open For
CINEMA II
BOARD
Interviews to be
held Wed., Jan. 20
and Thurs., Jan. 21
in 3516 S.A.B.
Sign up on S.G.C.
BulletinBoard,
S.A.B.-Lobby
(ask at desk)

l i

i i

"YOU
STATE
theatre
Dial
662-6264
at State is
Liberty
tI R
H

MUST SEE THIS FILMI"
-Richard Schicke, Life
COLUMBIA PiCTURES Presents a BBS Produtbon
JACK NICHOLSON
1 I' 3rd
WEEK!
J 4 VOPEN 1 P.M. C0i.R
r° Shows oEt 1:20-3:10-5-7-9 P.M.

A SEMINAR
FOR PEOPLE SICK AND TIRED OF
WAR AND VIOLENCE

U

FLARES

-- BELLS

-- REGULAR

For further information:
761-7403 or 665-0428

Cotton jeans, cords, wool dress or flare, permanent press

I

I

Buy fist pair at
regular price-get
2nd pair
Buy 2 pair at
regular price-get
3rd pair

f ~Provided 2nd pair
f f priced no more than
1st pair

" Chances for chemical-biological warfare on Pales-
tine?
" What is a fahlawi personality?
" How Jews and Arabs can live together in Jesu-
solem?
" Potential and possibilities for a Mideast federa-
tion in 1973?
* What are Palestinian and Israeli activists doing
for peace?

0
0

FREE

Provided 3rd pair
priced no more than
the lesser of first two

What is the social psycholgy of peoples in conflict?
What are the Middle East military industrial com-
plexes?

These are typical topics in the
SEMINAR ON THE
ARAB-ISRAEL CONFRONTATION

.i A' r a

i

11

11

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan