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December 11, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The U-M Folklore Society Presents NEWS PH1
BUSINESS P
EARL ROBINSON
hor of Ballad for Americans, Joe Hill, etc.) -Ann Arbor, Michigan
MONDAY, DEC. 13 8:30 P.M.
at the Ark-1421 Hill Street
ADMISSION CHARGE $1.50rj
($1.00 FOR FOLKLORE SOCIETY MEMBERS)

ONE: 764-0552
PHONE: 764-0554

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SftP~i!3an~

a- at'lu

page three

Saturday, December 11, 1971

B' riePfs
By The Associated Press

i
I
i

Rehnquist
High Coi

approved.

for

.- .

4* - . . ..-

r
U of M Arts Chorale
Christmas Concert
Dec. 12, 1971 at 8:40P.M.
in Hill Auditorium
Works by Stravinski, Poulenc, Britton -
Bach, Pinkham, and others.
- MAYNARD KLEIN, conductor
FREE ADMISSION

rt

after

debate

I

Ll"-t --s 'ts 1=1-71

ARM/Michigan Film Society presents
Orson Welles'
incomparable masterpiece
tizen Kane
The $60,000,000 ego-trip of
Charles Foster Kane
"He had some private form of greatness, but he
kept it to himself."-Rosebud
-TONIGHT-
NATURAL SCIENCE AUDITORIUM

-U

U.S. STEEL CORP. announced price increases of 7.7 per
cent yesterday on a broad range of products to be used in the
autoand appliance industries.
The announcement followed by just three days a ruling by the
Federal Price Commission in Washington granting U.S. Steel per-
mission to raise prices across the board an average of 3.6 per cent.
A spokesman said the 7.7 per cent increase, applied to "less,
than half of out total products and does not affect the rest of the
line."
GOVERNMENT SCIENTISTS reported yesterday that most
of the DDT used in the world remains unaccounted for and that
man is extremely lucky not to have absorbed more than he has.
Nearly 6.2 billion pounds of the pesticide have been manufactured
and used worldwide since 1942, the report said, but only about 11.9
million pounds can be found in the tissues of all humans, plants,
animals, fish and birds on the planet.
** *
THE NATO ALLIES closed ranks yesterday in the face of a
Soviet military buildup around the world.
The 15 NATO members set about patching up old differences
with a series of new compromises covering political, economic and
military issues that have nagged them for years.
At the center of NATO's re-emerging unity was a political agree-:
ment' to delay the start, of talks with the Communist countries on
European system of security. These exchanges will begin, the allies
said in a communique, only after the Soviet Union signs and seals
a Big Four accord on divided Berlin.
A BROADER, more intensive $1.6 billion attack on cancer
will be launched under a bill sent to President Nixon yesterday.
The bill gives an enlarged budget to the 34-year-old Nationalj
Cancer Institute and mandates it to step up its research into the
causes of and a cure for cancer.
It also contains provisions designed to give the cancer agency
direct access to the White House in getting support for its effort.
* * *
A LIFEBOAT with 12 aboard was sighted and its occupants
picked up in mid-Pacific yesterday near where a Danish freighter
had radioed Wednesday that its crew was abandoning ship.
The vessel, the Heering Kirse, was several hundred miles north-
east of Midway Island when it encountered trouble. The survivors
did not know whether any other members of the 36 man crew left:
the ship.

Nobel Prizes awarded

by Sen. Birch
to postpone
Jan. 18.

WASHINGTON (R) - The Senate confirmed yesterday
President Nixon's nomination of Asst. Atty. Gen. William
Rehnquist to be a Supreme Court Justice. The vote was 68-to
26. On the roll call 30 democrats voted for Rehnquist's nom-
ination and 23 against; 38 republicans voted for and three
against. The dissenting republicans were Jacob Javits (N.Y.),
Edward Brooke (Mass.), and Clifford Case (N.J.).
Opponents, who challenged Rehnquist's commitment to
civil rights and civil liberties, gave up the fight after the Sen-
ate rejected, 70-22, a motion(1 --

Bayh (D-Ind.)
a vote until

Sweden's 89-year-old King
Gustaf Adolf handed out Nobel
Prizes worth a hefty $90,000
each yesterday to four scientists
and a Chilean poet-diplomat.
Meanwhile in a separate cere-
mony in Oslo, Norway, Chancel-
lor Willy Brandt of West Ger-
many was awarded the Nobel
Peace Prize.
Pictured above are four of the
five winners including, from left
to right, Pablo Neruda, Earl
Sutherland, Gerhard Herzberg
and Dennis Gabor. Missing from
the picture is Simon Kuznets, a

Harvard professor cited for his
theories of economic growth.
Pablo Neruda, a Chilean poet
and ambassador, won his prize
in literature; Dr. Sutherland of
Nashville, Tennessee for his
work in hormone research. In
Physics, Dr. Dennis Gabor, a
British subject working in the
U.S. was awarded a prize for
inventing holographic three-di-
mensional photography while in
chemistry, Canadian Gerhard

Confirmation of Rehnquist fol-
lowed an 89-1 Senate vote last
Monday approving President Nix-
on's nomination of Lewis F. Pow-
ell, Jr., a Richmond, Va., attorney,
to fill a second vacancy on the Su-
preme Court.
Rehnquist, 47, a former Phoenix,
Ariz., lawyer, will replace retired
Justice John Harlan. Powell, 64, a
former president of the American
Bar Association, will succeed the
late Justice Hugo Black.
Nixon; in announcing the nom-
inations on Oct. 21, described both
Rehnquist and Powell as judicial
conservatives and indicated he
hoped their appointment would
strengthen the "peace forces" in
society.
Rehnquist's nomination quickly
ran into opposition from civil
rights and labor leaders. Bayh and
some other liberal democrats in
the Senate joined in the effort to
block his confirmation.
Supporters of the nomination
said opponents had failed to make
a case and called Rehnquist out-
standingly qualified to serve on
tht Supreme Court.
The vote on confirmation came
speedily after the overwhelming
rejection of Bayh's motion to cut
it off.

Phase 2
controls
extended,
The House voted overwhelming-
ly yesterday to extend President
Nixon's economic control powers
and to compromise the touchy is-
sue of retroactive pay.
Nixon also signed a bill cutting
individual and business taxes by
$15.8 billion over three years, hil-
ing it as in inflation-controlling
measure that will increase pur-
chasing powers. Nixon had been
expected to give the bill quickap-
proval after it was passed by the
House and Senate on Thursday.
In a related economic develop-
ment, the Federal Reserve Board
yesterday approved the actions of
four federal reservebanks reduc-
ing the discount rate for 43/ to
411 per cent.
S TheHouse supported the full
extension of economic powers re-
quested by Nixon through April 30,
1973 in a 324-33 vote. It rejected
proposals for an earlier cutoff.
A second amendment would re-
quire retroactive payment of pre-
viously negotiated raises caught in
Nixon's 90-day freeze under spe-
cified conditions:
When prices had been increased
because of such raises, in the case
of teachers and other public em-
ployes when taxes had been raised
or appropriations voted and when
worker productivity had increased
so as to justify the raises.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5-by carrier, $6 by mail.

8 and 10 p.m.

$1 cont.

C

I

Herzberg, a
was cited.

molecular specialist,

CENEMWA II
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
at 7 and 9
THE FIREMEN'S BALL
(Czechoslovakian 1968)
directed by MILOS FORMAN
A comedy about a firemen's ball held for the purpose
of awarding an honorary hatchet to an 86-year-old
fire chief. Its release caused the resignation of
40,000 Czech firemen.
Renata Adler-"A shaggy dog story, with the pes-
simism of the exquisite logic that leads nowhere."
Auditorium A, Angell Hall
75c

1h

I

the ann arbor film cooperative presents
I Steve McQueen and Jaqueline Bissett in Peter Yates'

Ti IC~rAV

I V Ca WAR I
DEC. 14
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
(And 11:15 p.m. if pre-
vious show sold out and
attendance warrants)

BULLITT

A cop with existential
cool. Knock-out chases,
exciting, believable de-
tective thriller. Color.
Rated M

I

THURSDAY Raquel Welch, Mae West in Michael Sarne's version of
DEC.16 MYRA BRECKENRIDGE
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. after Gore Vidal's novel. Controversial camp! Color. Cinemascope
Ann Arbor Premiere!
RATED X. Persons under 18 not admitted.
Both showings at AUDITORIUM A-ANGELLHALL-still only 75c-on sale at 6 p.m.
Happy Holidays!-See you in January with ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT

COUNCIL THEATRE
presents
THE DAY LATKE
LOST ITS LATKES
orI
When the Jews
were caught with
their Pans down.
A HANNUKAH
COMEDY-FARCE
written by MEL FOSTER and
ALAN EISENSTOCK
3 SHOWS: 4:15, 7, and 8:30
directed by Alan Eisenstock
TUESDAY, December 14
at Hillel-1429 Hill
only 25c

I

B

BILLIARDS
TABLE TENNIS
BOWLING
FOOSBALL
UNION

I

1I

SHOWCASE NO. 2
Schehade
YASco

a

m

1

I

IS

ARM/Michigan Film Society presentations for the rest of December
-clip and save $1
exam break escapes Holiday fare
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY FRIDAY-SATURDAY CHRISTMAS DAY NEW YEAR'S
DECEMBER 14 DECEMBER 15 DECEMBER 17-18 DECEMBER 25 DEC. 31-JAN. 1
Color double-bill for the finally FRANZ KAFKA'S the much heralded Fearless Vampire
imagination: Michoel Curtiz' classic
if a 24 year old rock star were elected The Trial BOGART Killers
President of the U.S. and everybody double-bill-both films also with CASABLANCA or, PARDON ME, BUT
over 30 were retired into LSD camps ... written and directed by Edward G. Robinson YOUR TEETH ARE IN MY NECK
Hollywood would call it-
Orson Welles BULLETS or BALLOTS Bogart, Peter Lorre, Sidney Greenstreet,wh ski Sha T
Wild in the Streets 1936 Ingrid Bergman, Claude Rains, Paul wit Polan, aron ate-
with WELLES, JEANNE MOREAU, ANwoHenreid, and Dooly Wilson. Intelligent vampire spoof.
CHRIS JONES, SHELLEY WINTERS, THONY PERKINS, ELSA MARTINELLI, with Joan ndellTWO SHORT FILMS:
DIANE VARSI 7:00 & 10:15 P.M. ROMY SCHNEIDER. -:-0"play it again Sam."
"Welles best film since KANE." -AND- Death of the Stag
-and-DRACULA HasWellesbes film , A A. v... nf. t--lit. .. Rick's cafe Americaine teems with

Trueblood Theater
ENDS SAT.
Box Office 2-8

thi8s WOKPIW
$1.50 *
from England
John Roberts
and
Tony Barrand
English Music Hall
Novelty, Humor
SAT.--2:00 P.M. 50c

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