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December 11, 1971 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-12-11

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, December 1 1, 1971

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, December 11, 1971

Mesh ing

By HERB BOWIE
Last night at Crisler Arena, a
full-house of over 15,000 persons
witnessed one of the most amaz-
ing shows ever: the John Sin-
clair Freedom Rally. Although
everyone had favorites, the star
was not any individual or group,
but the counter-culture itself.
Nearly anyone who's nobody in
the mainstream of American
culture was there.
Allen Ginsberg, certainly one
of the fathers .of the whole thing
(if such a movement could be
said to have parents) started
the whole thing off, about the
only way one could, with some
deep moans and wails of pure
spirit, accompanied by guitar.
A few songs followed, which,
despite an enthusiastic delivery,
sounded pretty mediocre, most

of the words being incompre-
hensible.
Bobby Seale, flanked by a
brace of bodyguards, climaxed
a series of speeches with a pow-
erful o r a t i o n that certainly
proved, if not his political
prowess, his speaking ability.
Time after time his voice slam-
med home his message like a
sledge-hammer; his body rocking
back and forth with the rhythm
of the words. The drama of his
politics was only exceeded by
Phil Ochs' strirring songs.
Bob Seger with Teagarden and
Van Winkle, certainly one of the
most satisfying Michigan bands,
next ripped into a dynamite set
that more than quenched the
audience's thirst for rock and
roll.
Replacing Joy of Cooking on

in-to0
the bill, they played churning
performances of "Who Do You
Love," "Oh Carol," "God, Love,
and Rock and Roll," and their
new single, "Looking Back."
Dylan,, whose presence was
sorely missed, despite Jerry Rub-
in's defense of him for awaken-
ing our consciousness-was pres-
ent in body if not in spirit. Sev-
eral of his albums and singles
were thrown to the appreciative
audience after being liberated
from a Columbia Records distri-
butor.
Phil Ochs followed with an
acoustic set that included the
only successful protest song of
the night. In a pre-song rap,
Ochs named Nixon as the fore-
most symbol of evil in America
and when on to sing about him
in a remodeled song that had

counter-culture

originally been about Mississippi.
The Up followed and, consider-
ing the occasion and the band,
did the perfect song, "Jailhouse
Rock." Their set closed with
"Free John, Now," copies of
which were distributed free at
the rally. It seems that the only
time the Up can get someone
to listen to their music on a
record, is to give it away-and
even then, copies of the record
littered the floor.
A live phone call from a deep-
ly moved John Sinclair then
brought home to the audience
more than any of the speakers
or musical groups had, the
harsh, oppressive realities of
American justice. He didn't
have much quotable to say-
just "I wish I could be there,
man" in a cracking voice.
But in a sense Sinclair was
there. For this was his rally-
where finally politics and music
formed 'one thing - where one
couldn't distinguish where the
songs left off and the politics
beagn. Perhaps Jerry Rubin
summed it up when he looked
around and told the audience
that "this is the counter cul-
ture." A place where music and
politics were one and indistin-
guishable.
The counter-culture 1 o o k e d
pretty good last night. All the
various parts of the show sound-
ed together, not as an acci-
dental discordance, but as a
single resounding chord. Hope-
fully more rallies like this can
take place here-at least one
more - to celebrate John's re-
lease.

Program Information 665-6290
.gFJ Ifl

W.RRY! LAST DAYS
Today at 1-3-5-7-9

"..0gut-tightening thriller and one of the most
exciting films you'll see this year!"Ken Barnard-Det. News
CLINT EASTWOOD
PLAY MISTY IFOgmR ME'
.an Invitation to terror...
- -Y
AT STATE & LIBERTY
* Dial 662-6264
jTATE OPEN 12:45
Shows at 1,3,5, 7 & 9P.M.
NOW SHOWING!
"it's a joy... the jokes
and gags are nonstop."
American Iternational. CwO
P UI

SNEAK
PREVUE
TON IGHT

dow

DIAL
8-6416

"INGMAR BERGMAN'S 'THE TOUCH' IS THE BEST
FILM ABOUT LOVE HE HAS EVER MADE."
-Penelope Gilliatt, The New Yorker

Elliott Gould
Bergman's

"The Touch"

TODAY AT 1-3-5-7
and after Prevue

jI

-Daily-Jim Wallace I I

i

"DEAD tired at end of semester?
GRATEFUL for two great nights

Be
of

IC
music.

GRATEFUL DEAD
HILL AUDITORIUM

SNEAK PREVIEW TONITE 9:30
A FASCINATING
VAMPIRE SHOCKER!
VWE GUARANTEE
THAT IT WILL GLUE
YOU T OYOUR SEAT -
-Howard Thompson,
New York Times

-Daily-Robert Wargo

Tues., Dec.

14-Wed., Dec. 15

Perspective: Key for'Players'

r.w.:.:.:.:.M ~ ~ U

By MITCHELL ROSS
Several students from God-
dard House cooperative in Oxford
Housing have worked this fall at
producing two one-act plays,
which were performed last night
in the East Quad Aud.
Leading the Players are
Michael Samutt and Charles,
Keeps. Samutt's energy is com-
mendable: he directed both
plays, starred in one, and pub-
licized the whole matter as well.
The first of the offerings was
William Saroyan's little melo-
drama, Hello, Out There. The
play isn't much-dealing with an
imprisoned rapist and his en-
counters with the jail's battered,
female custodian, and the raped
woman's husband.
Samutt plays the rapist, Pho-
tofinish, without any particular
success. The cries of "Hello, Out,
There," coming from a man con-
fessing to be "as lonely as a
coyote," might have consider-
able poignance were they prop-
erly cadenced, but Samutt had
great difficulty in pacing this
play, where atmosphere and
timing help roduce the tawdry
effects. The trouble stemmed
from a lack of perspective on
Saturday and Sunday
Crackers
with
TH E
MARX
BROTHERS
dir. V. Heerman, 1930
with
MARGARET
DUMONT!
The brothers invade high

,Samutt's part; in the leading role
he was unable to look things
over from the objective stance
of the director.
More successful was the second
production, Lawrence Langer's
satire on marriage mores, An-
other Way Out, revised by none
other than Sanutt.
In this play there are mo-
ments when the acting sharpen-
ed up. Keeps played writer
P o m e r o y Pendleton without
much serious concentration, slip-
ping in and out of character as
most men do their bathrobes.
But all this didn't seem to
matter much, because Keeps and
Pendleton emerge as remarkab-
ly similar human beings. The
result is lovable, the chubby
Keeps-Pendleton becoming the
center of the play, and we laugh
and enjoy ourselves.
As Mrs. Abbey, the servant,
Valerie Evers rewards us with
a precious moment when she
carts her eyes on Pendleton af-
ter the latter has offered to se-
duce her. The rest of the cast
NOW SHOWING
DIAL 434-1782
ON WASHTENAW AVE.
11/2 MILES EAST OF
ARBORLAND-U.S. 23
TODAY OPEN 6:45
SHOWS AT 7 P.M. & 9 P.M.
SAT. & SUN. Open 12:45
Showvs at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
HIS FIRST JOB IN 9 YEARS!

serves, for the most part, but
Samutt's direction is slow-witted
and static. At moments we get
the unhappy impression that the
actors, as they stare into the
dark, are ducks meeting in an
unfamiliar pond.
What overcomes the many
flaws, however, is a certain na-
tural quality to the work. Even
when the acting is poor, it is
honest. Perhaps this can be
credited to the performers knowl-
edge of one another, but even
more, I think, we can applaud
the Goddard House Players for
the spirit in which their work
was produced-withouthpretense,
without sham, but only in the
hope of enjoying oneself while
trying to entertain a ,few people
in the meanwhile.

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
PLAYERS SERIES
presents
YOU CAN'T TAKE
IT WITH YOU
QUIRK AUDITORIUM

i
i

TUES. thru Sun., Dec. 7-12
8:00 p.m.

$

For reservations dial
QUIRK BOX OFFICE
487-1221 between
12:45 and 4:30 p.m.

2.00

SATURDAY-OPEN 1:45 ~
"DAUGHTERS OF DARKNESS"
2 050 80 11 pm
"NEXT" 3:30 6:30:j
SNEAK, PREVIEW 9:30 ONLY ' ."

ALL SEATS RESERVED

*-

: ..
.,,,. :.
.:: r..

.- _.

A DECLARATION !
When in the course of human events it becomes necessary to
inform you of a SNEAK PREVUE of a hilarious X-rated movie, the title
and contents of which we are not permitted to divulge . . . and whereas
vnn edJL4 nn b JL4 l the Ce ..tr with certnin unaliennble ri hts

yuu are en ow u uy i ,er a glr ~~Ur IU11U 1 llt . .
and one of these is the pursuit of HAPPINESS .
It becomes your privilege to attend the CAMPUS Theatre
SATURDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 11th. One showing only at 9 P.M.
ENJOY ENJOY ENJOY
LOIS GRANBERG Theatre Manager
P.S. A hint of the title. . . "T. D. MOVIE"
THE BLUSHES BEGIN AT 9 P.M. COME EARLY
t:'r

George.

___

ALLEY
CINEMA
330 MAYNARD
FINAL WEEK
OF
ESCAPISM

MONDAY
DEC. 13
CHILDREN
OF
PARADISE
1943-45
"Breathtaking . . close
to perfection . .. guaran-

TUESDAY
DEC. 14
THE
COMMITTEE
An unconventional film-
ed performance of a
group of west coast en-

WED.-TH U RS.
DEC.,15 & 16
THE
GREAT
CHASE

-I

.

.

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