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December 10, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, December 1 Q, I.971

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, December10, p1971

Gay advocates appointed

(Continued from Page 1)
Toy adds, "We seek direction
from the community and we an-
swer to them. If someone comes
to us and says that they're being
kicked out of school because
they're gay, we want to be able
to do something to help them. We
can act as peer advisors."
In addition, Gair and Toy plan
to build a library of gay books and
newspapers.
"The whole University commun-
ity is generally misinformed about
gay people," says Gair, "by the
mass media and by the gay stereo-
type. We can start. making the
straight community aware of the'
reality of what it means to be
gay.")
Vice President for Student Serv-
ices Robert Knauss stresses 'that
Gair and Toy are part of a de-,
veloping program built around the!
theme of "Human Sexuality". OSS
already provides various servicesI
Dining pan
DPi
(Continued from Page 1)
$55,000 annually in operating costs.
A referendum held at Lloyd last
week showed 99 per cent of the
residents to. be against the plan.
Students feel a "sterile, 'con-
venience food' dining facility"
could destroy the warm, personal
atmosphere of the Pilot Program.
In addition, a resolution to pro-
vide funds to be used to remodel
Alice Lloyd's vacated kitchen and
dining space was passed, 7-1.
Tom Lobe, building director of
Alice Lloyd, voiced dissatisfaction
with the plan, questioning the
policy committee's interest in ed-
ucation as compared to "saving
money and housing students."
He contended Lloyd is being ex-
ploited by the University, citing
the large number of small triple
rooms and pressing rooms used
for student living quarters. He also
complained that Lloyd is being
forced to pay more than its portion
of a bond issue it shares with the
Residential College.
Housing Director John Feldkamp
suggested that the money saved in
operational costs of the new fa-
cilities be used for the reduction
of triples at Lloyd and stabilization
of room and board rates at
Couzens.
Lobe also said he plans to bring
the issue before Lloyd's standing
committee and bring its two psy-
chologists, Ted Newcomb and Don
Brown, to the next Housing Policy
Committee meeting. Newcomb and
Brown have stated that the plan-
ned construction may threaten
Lloyd's educaional program. Lobe
said the standing committee will
consider. presenting the issue to
the faculty.

related to sexuality such as prob-
lem pregnancy counseling.
Last year, OSS and the Office
of Religious Affairs sponsored a
day-long workshop on homosex-
uality involving over 30 University
counselors and over 20 homosexual
persons.
During the summer, a commit-
tee, composed of representatives
of many of the units within OSS
and persons from the homosexual
community, formulated a proposal
requesting a full-time profession-
al staff assistant to "relate re-
sponsibly to the homophile groups
on campus," according to an OSS
report.
In a compromise measure, ap-
proval was obtained in September,
to hire two part-time program as-
sistants to work with the staff in
the specific area of homosexuality.
;Sinclair case
(Continued from Page 1)
mittee to Free John Sinclair will
now work to urge the governor to
pardon her husband and all pris-
oners who have already served
time in excess of the sentences
defined in the new bill. She said
about 150 prisoners fall into this
category.
Sinclair has already served over
two years of a 9/2-10 year sen-
tence. The new bill lowers mari-
juana convictions from felony to
misdemeanor status. Under the
bill, "possession" of less than two
ounces of marijuana would be
punishable by a one year term
and a $1000 fine.
Meanwhile, Sinclair has been
moved out of segregation at Jack-
son State Prison, it was learned.
He was moved into the "trustee
division" of the prison, a dormi-
tory-like housing system, on
Wednesday, Leni Sinclair said.
Sinclair had charged the prison
with discriminatory treatment on
the basis of his political beliefs
and had brought a suit against
prison authorities in federal dis-
trict court in October. Leni Sin-
clair believes he was finally moved
out of segregation due to the
pressure brought against the pri-
son through the suit.
Sinclair is now awaiting an ap-
peal of his conviction before the
state Supreme Court. While
agreeing to hear the case, the high
court refused to grant Sinclair
appeal bond. The plea for bail
pending the appeal was brought
before federal district court on
Monday.
HANUKAH PARTY
5:30 Sunday, Dec. 12
Menorah lighting
Latkes Entertainment
at HILLEL (1429 Hill)
$1

Pilot initiates
(Continued from Page 1)
college's Curriculum Committee,
which must approve all college
curriculum changes, for a new.
grading method.
Last term the committee ap-
proved pass-fail grading for the
Course Mart courses and suggest-
ed that the same system be used
in Pilot Program. Yet representa-
tives of the program argued that
because of the "special personal-
ized relationship" between staff
and students, no failures would
ever be given.
The Pilot Program rather pro-
posed thenpass-no entry grading
system, an idea which the Pilot
Program Standing Committee (a
12-member policy body composed
of literary college faculty and
Pilot students and staff) sup-
ported. -
The new system, however, may
run into a snag in eliminating the
attacks of critics that Pilot courses
are "easier" and have tended to
create an artifically high grade
point for Pilot students compared
to the rest of the students.
Pilot officials have been quick
to claim that higher grades in
their courses are due to greater
interest and motivation. If this is
true, then students who work

new program .
h rd t in Pilot courses 4iight b.
penalized.
This possible problem points up
the experimental nature of the
grading.
Literary c o11 e g e Dean Frank
Rhodes said that LSA officials view
the grading experiment as a part
of a larger effort on the part of
the Curriculum Committee to eval-
uate present grading.
"We'll have to analyze how pass-
no entry affects individual student
performance, whether it hinders
students when they apply for jobs
and to graduate schools, and
whether it will encourage students
to take a longer time to graduate,"
he says.
One of the other new programs
at Lloyd next term will allow
freshmen and first term sopho-
mores to choose their own courses
and to sign their own election
cards, which in the past needed
the signature of a faculty coun-
selor.
The other half of Lloyd's two-
fold counseling experiment involves
dorm-center ,"peer" a c a d e m i c
counseling, funded by a $1,000 grant
from the University's Center for.
Research on Learning and Teach-
ing (CLRT).

New drug bill
on nued from Pag ,1)
The penalty for use of narcotics
such as heroin and over seven oth-
er opium or opium derivates would
be one year in jail and a $2,000
fine.
Simple possession would be four
years and $2,000 while delivery or
possession with the intent to de-
liver would be 20 years and $25,000.
It is at present unclear the dif-
ference between use and posses-
sion. Apparently violators can be
charged for either crime depend-
ing on the judgement of the po-
lice.
Second and subsequent offenses
in all categories except marijuana
could bring double the first sen-
tence. Marijuana would be held
to a one-year sentence in the case
of a second arrest on a "use
charge."

Stereo Salon
HUMBUG-We invest in
good equipment not car-
peting. You don't live
with us - so who cares
about overhead-we have
the best in stereo.
HI-FI Studio
121 W. WASHINGTON
668-7942
R.R.T.

State University of New York
in co-operation with
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundalions
announces two Winter Academic Programs in Israel
"MODERN ISRAEL: The Kibbutzas.. Idea and Ex-
perience"
1. Dec. 21-Jan, 4 (2 weeks, 2 credits)......$450
2. Jan. 4-Jan. 25 (3 weeks, 3 credits)......$499
Open to grads and undergrads. Cost includes
tuition, round-trip jet from New York, and kib-
butz accommodations in Israel.
APPLICATIONS available from: B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUN-
DATIONS, 1640 RHODE ISLAND AVE., N.W., WASHINGTON,
D.C. 20036

4

I

SHOWCASE NO. 2

Schehade
VASCO

DECEMBER ART FAIR
WHERE: Michigan Union Ballroom
WHAT: Artists displaying and Selling Their Crafts
WHO: Open t#o Everyone;. No Admission, Charge.
Artists interested in selling or displaying their work should call 764-7409
or go to room 240 Michigan Union for information and registration. Regis-
tration closes Friday, Dec. 10.

Hathaway r
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a man look like a very cool customer indeed.
§5
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ANN ARBOR D lT.R0IT
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t~cO~~eO'O~"Oxpce"~e"' "O "h~c"~x ^c~-O~"O h O' O aO'l§

True dTheater
ENDS SAT.
Box Office 2-8

GeV -;ics-'t t
lace
> d.
C/e
K

SPONSORED BY:

STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL
UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER
OFFICES OF SPECIAL SERVICES AND PROGRAMS

THERE'S A RUMOR GOING AROUND
THAT MARTHA COOK HAS CHANGED

WELL,
Her 21 meals a week haven't changed.
Her maid and rinen service haven't changed.
Her classic beauty hasn't changed.

BUT,

Her outlook on life has.
Come see for yourself. You'll love her.
THE MARTHA COOK BUILDING
A Residence for Undergraduate and Graduate Women

4

AUSTIN
DIAMOND

I

SPACES AVAILABLE FOR WINTER TERM
Call 769-3290

BILLIARDS
TABLE TENNIS
BOWLING
FOOSBALL
UNION

11209 S. Universitv 663-7151

'-

11

ii

r

Health Service Notice
Our Infirmary service and
Night Emergency Clinic operations
are being suspended
from 12:00 midnight Dec. 23 to
10:00 a.m. Jan. 9

41

DURING THIS PERIOD

FOR SERVICE INFORMATION

Call 764-8320

t

Presents:
Christmas in Europe --Vacation or Ski
ROUND TRIP JETS by Caledonian-Bua, Capitol, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines
" FULL DINNER WITH WINE 0 NON-STOP JET
r CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST * CANCELLATION PRIVILEGES
0 COMPLIMENTARY OPEN BAR " DEPOSIT HOLDS SEAT
* COMPLIMENTARY FRUITS, SNACKS " FINANCING ARRANGEMENTS
Air- Seats Car. FIt.
Craft Air No. Routing Depart/Return Cost Chg3 Total
B-707 186 CAL 215 Det/Lohdon/Det 12/26-1/10 $150 $15 $165
*DC-8 60 UNI 207 Det/Munich/Det 12/21-1/9 $180 $15 $195

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