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December 02, 1971 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-12-02

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,

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

An T T® Ta i '' x a - - -______________________________

Thursday, December 2, 197 1

V

Players,

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garish

flop

1.

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(;P &atis Calendar

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By MITCHELL ROSS
"Antony and Cleopatra" is
perhaps the most down-to-earth
of Shakespea e's famous trage-
dies. S~o great' figure, like Hamn-
let or Lear, towers above its ac-
lion, and the two lovers of the
,itle are neither young nor de-
cant. ':laced.in positions of
-o o er, 'they still succumb to the
passions and drives of ordinary
mnen and women: no Hamlet to
ntificate upon the value of
ifs overdeath,. no Lear to rage
at cliff's edge because of the
stink of evil which pervades the
So I am amazed by the pres-
ent production of this master-
piece which the University
Players set before us last night
on the stage of the Power Cen-
ter.: Ac.tors and' director alike
refuse to look inside the human
heart, but avail, themselves in-
stead 'of a' chance to beat their
own breastplates in garish cele-
bration of their opportunity to
play the Bard. Miserably pom-
pous and devilishly dumb, this
performance., marks the first
J op 'of the Players' season.
As Mark Antony, Edward Cic-
ciarelli resembles one of those
statuies left to. ,us by the Re-
mans, faceless bodies, whose
-true characters remain forever

a mystery. Now middle-aged
and no longer the bravado ora-
tor of "Julius Caesar", Antony is
trapped between a sense of duty
to the empire, and a commit-
ment to the women of his life.
When informed of the death of
his first wife, Fulvia, Antony
vows to break off with Cleopa-
tra and return home to resettle
his affairs. Still, Cleopatra's at-
traction is painfully acute, and
his farewell scene to her should
contain the first drop of poig-
nance in the production. In-
stead, all that Cicciarelli and
director Richard Burgwin see in
this is Antony's lust and Cleo-
patra's coyness. It is a hint of
things to come.
Cleo, played by Priscilla Lind-
say, is a plumpish brunette who
plays out her fantasies and an-
ger without heat or imagination.
We are reminded not of a wom-
an whom age cannot wither,
but of one who is shut in by
the crusty demands of domes-
ticity, not a ravishing queen but
a fading starlet whose best days
are long past.
Most intriguing, is William
Cross; who sees Octavius Caesar
as a prune-faced popinjay,
whose greatest delight in life
is to pucker up his lips in an-
ticipation of a salty line. Rare-

ly have I seen an actor spend so
much time displaying facial
contortions as representative of
a major character. Never have
I known an actor to so thorn
oughly ruin a part due to sheer
egotism. I would like. to take
this opportunity to wonder
aloud what Mr. Cross is doing
on stage. The object of acting
is not to work so hard at making
an ass of oneself; rather, the
purpose is to make real some-
thing outside of oneself, yet at-
tached to it by a kind of spirit-
ual umbilical cord. Cross nei-
ther thought about the pivotal
character of Octavius Caesar,
nor gave consideration to such
thought. His acting intelligence
might well have been borrowed=
from a ,stray bird.
Mostly, I, am ashamed of di-
rector Burgwin for allowing
such claptrap to appear upon
the stage. His direction leads me
to believe that everyone in the
cast had his script memorized
before they had it read. Yet,
the director tries a few touches
of his own. He adds, as back-
ground music, a few strains
from four twentieth-century
composers, as incidential music.
The effect is to make the drama
more consciously melodramatic
than tragic, and also, at mo-

ments when the music is most
exciting, to accentuate the tur-
gidity of the acting.
Another stroke is. to have
soothsayer Richard Frank sit
along the sidelines like some
nosy little kid, and listen to
all that goes on between the
actors. What is, indeed, disturb-
:nis .to discover that the
soothsayer is asgarrulous as
everybody else when he delivers
his lines. I wonder what would
happen if these same people
who pecked with such moral
cowardice at Antonyuand Cleo-
patra were to tackle "Hamlet":
no doubt everyone would talk
like Polonius.
Lest I seem overwhelmingly
nasty I might mentiOn that
Evan Jeffries as Enobarbus and
David Kelly as Lepidus came
across as live, interesting hu-
man beings, and some of the
famous Shakespearian walk-on
characters are done with rea-
sonable facility.
But still my cry on this date
must be, "Fraud!" They've
taken the bard from our hearts
and turned him to stone, only
to leave us in the dark as all
crumbles into dust.

Thursday, Dec. 2
Film--
Alley Cinema, 330 Maynard
Ingmar Bergman's "Persona" 7, 9:30 and 11:15 p.m.'
Fifth Forum
"Joe Hill" 7 and 9 p.m.*
Michigan Theater
"Play Misty for Me" 1,3,5,7 and 9 p.m.*
State Theater
"Bless the Beasts and Children" 1,3,5,7 and 9 p.m.*
Campus Theater
"Medicine Ball Caravan" 7 and 9 p.m.*
Theatre-
Power Center, University Players
"Anthony and Cleopatra" 8 p.m.*
*denotes events for which admission is charged

Joe Hill, the movie:
"A7BEAUTIFUL WORK,
PART HISTORY, PART
SOCIOLOGY AND IN
LARGEST PART, A FILM
BALLAD ABOUT A FOLK
HERO! DIRECTOR
BO WIDERBERG HAS
TAKEN A PART OF
HISTORY AND GIVEN IT
THE GLOW OF LEGEND!"
--Judith Crisi, New York Magazine
"80 WIDERBERG'S 'JOE
HILL' IS SPLENDID
BEYOND REALITY!"
-PaulOD.Zimmerman, Newsweek

Joe Hill, the man:
Joe Hill was a banjo-playing
drifter who became an organ-
izer of the radical "Wobblies'
In 1915, he was indicted for
murder and executed.
Many felt he was framed.
It has fallen to Bo Widerberg,
director of "Elvira Madigan",
to tell this uniquely American
story. In "Joe Hill'; he chooses
not to concentrate on the
political being or musician but
concentrates on Joe Hill the MAN.
Paramount Pictures Presents
A Sagittarius Production
A BO WIDER BERG FILM
"J/EL"
who wrote songs and was shot.
sain
THOMMY BERGGREN
Wntt-. D1retemnProduced by B0 WIDERBERG
Thie song sung by JOAN BAEZ in Color
A aramount iture " "
Shown -P
7&9

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Daily Official Bulletin
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2
Computing Ctr. Short Course: "Intro-
duction of U of M BASIC," Seminar
Rm, Computing Ctr, 3-5 pm.
Mental Health Res. Inst.: S. Mat-
thysse, Mass Gen. Hosp., "Schizophre-
nia: The Transmethlation and Dopa-
mine Theories," 1057 MHRI, 3:45 pmn.
Coll.of Architecture and Design: G.
Birkerts, FAIA, "New Directions in the
Design of Buildings," Aud. A, Angell
Hall. 4 pm.
Music School: Piano Dept. Student
Recital, Sch. of Mus. Recital Hall,
12:30 pm.
Ctr. for Coord. ofaAncient and Mod-
ern Studies: Thomas S. Jerome Lec-
tures- "From Croesus to Constantine:
The Cities of Western Asia Minor and
Their Arts in Greek & Roman Times,"

G. Hanfmann, Harvard Univ., "Hellen-
ization Takes Command," Aud. B, An-
gell Hall, 4:10 pm.
CAREER PLANNING
& PLACEMENT
3200 S.A.B.
JOBS IN A.A. AREA: for more info.,
call 764-7460.
Psychiatric Care Worker Staff Co-
ordinator in an Ann Arbor hoasp., min.
2 yrs. college plus experience.
Nuclear Medicine Technologist in an
Ann Arbor hosp., BS in math or sci-
ence, will train, no exper. nec.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
212 S.A.B.
ANNOUNCEMENT
United Central Services, Toledo, Ohio.
Openings for sophomores and juniors
interested in social work in Toledo
area. Applications should be filed in
Dec., further details available.

oFIFTH s'oruil
FITH AVIMMU AT L9BERTV

Enjoying life's finer things

71

By BARBEL WEBER
In the-event any of your ama-
teur.gourmets are planning
something grandiose to show off
your culinary talents, now avail-
able to you in a radius of two
.iiles .are two new stores whose
epicurean delights could spruce
up your Kraft macaronni din-
'iier, anytime!.
The Wine Shop, located
across from the Alley on May-
nard and the International Mar-
ket in' Kerry Town on N. Fifth
hext' to the Farmer's Market
are two definite gastronomical
assets' to our community.
The Wine Shop offers a variety
of"'fine wines - rose, burgundys,
and. bordeauxs - imported from
,all c.rners of Europe, and do-
mestic wines from our infamous
West: Coast.,
It seems that many students
have ;finally grown out of the
'Boone's" Farm" stage and a r e
The- Michigan Daily, edited and man-
.aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
j'ay through Sunday morning Uciver-
pity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
" athrough Saturday morning.
Susrption rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mall.

getting turned on to the finer
things in life. According to own-
er Robert Littleton, students
have been his most frequent cus-
tomers. To what can this pop-
ularity among the student body
be attributed?
"Kids can really relate to wines
because of travel," says Little-
ton. "They've been to Burgundy,
France, and other wine capitals
in Europe and have learned to
appreciate good wines. When
they buy a bottle of burgundy
wine in the states it brings back
old memories."
The past snob connoiseur lab-
el that was attached to f i n e
ARM presents
Godard's
Vladimir
and Rosa
"plenty of cinematic hi-
jInks . . .flashes of the
Marx Brothers and Ber-
tolt Brecht. On the whole,

wines had affected its sales and
still exists. But now, competing
strongly with the pop wines
Ripple, Bali Hai, etc., fine wines
are definitely on the, increase.
Even the people who brought
you "Budweiser-King of Beer"
will soon be bringing you their
version of the "golden grape."
"Wine sales in the midwest are
virtually untapped," says Little-
ton. "I expect wine sales to triple
in the next three years."
See ENJOYING, Page 7
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
OF FEAR
Dir. FRITZ LANG, 1943
with RAY MILLAND,
MARJORIE REYNOLDS,
and DAN DURYEA
LANGIAN FEAR strikes
an ex-con who becomes
marked for death in a
tale of international in-
trigue.
SHORT: Fun after
the wedding
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUC
7:00 and 9:05 75c

EASTERN MICHIGANUNIVERSITY
PLAYERS SERIES
presents
YOU CAN'T TAKE
IT WITH YOU

6
DIAL 5-6290
"One of the most excit-
ing films you'll see this
year. -Det. News
CLINT
EAST rWOO"D

QUIRK
TUES. thr
8:00 p.m.

I
1

AUDITORIUM
u Sun., Dec. 7-12
$2.00
For reservations dial
QUIRK BOX OFFICE
487-1221 between
12:45 and 4:30 p.m. .,
LL SEATS RESERVED

CINEMA Ii
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
7and9
THE END
OF THE RA
(1969)
SCREEN ADAPTATION OF
JOHN BARTH'S 1958 NOVEL
OF LIFE IN ACADEMIA
directed by ARAM AVAKIAN
with Stacy Keach, Harris Yulin, Dorothy Tristan and
James Earl Jones.
Roger Greenspun of the N.Y. Times calls it, "a
fairly close, sometimes clumsy adaptation."
75c Auditorium A,
Angell Hall

r :

[I

A

b

f;

I

Oakland Congress Concert-Lecture Series
Presents:
THE ROCK OPERA
'SUPERSTAR'
SATURDAY 4 Dec. 1971-8:00 p.m.
O.U. Sports & Recreation Bldg.

I

"PLAY MISTY
FOR ME"
TODAY AT 1-3-5-7-9

UI

this is
Godard

the best recent
I've seen."

the ann arbor film cooperative presents
STEVE McQUEEN and FAYE DUNAWAY in Norman Jewistons
THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR
Urban millionaire gets his kicks by robbing banks. Brilliant color photography with
use of multi-screen. Academy Award: Best Song.
THURSDAY-DECEMBER 2nd-ONLY!

i { '.
h
4::: ;:
3 h :
G+Ia;
it .' ',
t si

'1

-Stanley Kauffman
THE NEW REPUBLIC
FRI -SAT.-SUN.
Dec. 3-5-7:30 & 9:30
Nat. Sci. Aud.

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Advanced Ticket Sale
29 Nov.-3 Dec.
Available Student
Organization Office only

4 Dec.
Tickets at Door
$3.50 O.U. Student
$4.00 General

auditorium a
angell hall

7 & 9:30

I

still only

P.m.
75c

PAUL NEWMAN
in
'COOL HAND LUKE'
STOCKWELL HALL

COMING TUESDAY--Dec. 7th-
Catherine De Neuve in Luis Bunuel's BELLE DE JOUR

$3.00 O.U. Student
$4.00 General

U
U

COME TO THE
lASS

9 p.m. TONIGHT

Admission 75c

-_._

EETI

G

BOX OFFICE-POWER CENTER
Shakespeare's
"' Antony and
Cleopatra
Power Center, December 1-4, 8 P.M.
Box Office opens at 12:30 P.M.
Tickets from $1.50-$3.00
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS

TO FIND OUT ABOUT

-TAKING A COURSE ABOUT EDUCATIONAL
AND SOCIAL CHANGE
SETTING UP A NEW COURSE
"PARTICIPATING IN AN ESTABLISHED COURSE
THRU SELF-DETERMINED
-INDEPENDENT STUDY
-GROUP STUDY
-COMMUNITY ACTION

4

_ __

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
PRESENTS
CANNED
HEAT

T

URS.

E

7:30, AUD. D
DD9'9DAM

.2
ANGELL
HALL

.V

sunday, december 5

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