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September 09, 1971 - Image 65

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-9

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Thursday, September 9, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eleven

Thursday, September 9, 1971 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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CHANGING TACTICS
The left and right of 'U' politics

(Continued from Page 3)
dent Judiciary put SDS in debt,
and finally eliminated it com-
pletely as a student organization,
but more than that, the charac-
teristic illness of such radical
organizations nationwide afflict-
ed the Ann Arbor chapter, too.
"SDS was there because enough
people were willing to carry on
an ongoing struggle," says one
long-time radical. "People are
apathetic now, for the most
part."
The campus branch of Interna-
tional Socialists (IS) has experi-
enced a nearly equivalent fate.
IS still exists on campus in name,
but according to one of the two
or three remaining members, the
A group has been totally inactive
for the ;past several months.
Once, too, the campus had a
Radical Caucus, where radicals
from several groups banded to-
gether on important issues. That
also has died, breathing its last
quietly during early 1970.

In many instances, however,
people who have been active in
the left for the last several years
are still here, few people, too,
have become radicalized over
specific issues, and stayed inter-
ested in what is left of Ann Ar-
bor's "movement."
As of this summer, the two
main organizations with stated
radical views were the campus
branch of New University Con-
ference (NUC) whose members
are mostly faculty people and
teaching fellows, and the Radical
Independent Party (RIP), a radi-
cal third party which formed
early this year, and has been en-
tering' candidates in local elec-
tions.
Both these groups have attract-
ed many of the so-called "old
rads," who have been active in
the University left for many
years.
Another important facet of the
radical movement is the women's
movement on campus, which has
in many ways come into its own

during the past year. Dozens of
women's groups have formed
and are active at the University.
Although most of the women's
groups have concentrated this
year on raising consciousness and
internal organizing and discus-
sion, several are issue-oriented
-for example, last fall's Child
Care Action Group, which work-
ed for a day care center in Ann
Arbor.
But, most important, perhaps,
in the left'sdnew style of activity,
are the ad hoc groups which
spring up periodically.
Such groups this year included
an ad hoc group to support strik-
ing University maintenance and
cafeteria workers, a group to
support Detroit auto workers,
and groups to stage protests
against such things as the Uni-
versity's job recruiting policy
and the nation's Vietnam activi-
ties.
These groups usually form at
hurriedly called mass meetings,
work together for several days
or weeks, (until the issue has
been eith'er "decided," or more
likely, died down for the mo-
ment), and finally, dissolve.
Not only have such groups at-
tracted the "old rads," but se
eral newer radicals have been

active and gained experience
through these groups.
The format of these groups
lends itself to the several hun-
dred person march or rally, or
symbolic attendance at import-
ant meetings, and also results
in less of the "traditional" con-
frontations by several thousand
people.
Whether the ad hoc groups and
organizing tactics will be used
again this year, or whether the
left will swerve back to tradi-
tional tactics remains to be seen.
Aa more verbal right will cer-
tainly have some bearing on
politics on the campus this com-
ing year, too, but the Univer-
sity's student community re-
mains predominately left, at
least in terms of those who are
active in campus politics.
T.V. RENTALS
$1 0.50/mo.
NEJAC T.V.
662-5671

The Centicore Bookshop
1229 South University 336 Maynard
Key Titles from Random House
& Knopf:
KAHIL GIBRAN: The Prophet
COLIN FLETCHER: The Complete Walker
R. D. LAING: Knots
September Paperback Release: 1.95
All Rod McKuen titles:
Stanyan Street & Other Sorrows
In Someone's Shadow
Listen to the Warm
With Love
Caught in the Quiet
New Ballads
THE LAST WHOLE EARTH CATALOGUE
and
LIVING ON THE EARTH

The campus drama scene

t
t

(Continued from Page 5)
Miser" or 1970's "Harvey" with
Helen Hayes and Jimmy Stewart.
The Professional Theatre Pro-
gram reciprocates by bringing
Broadway hits to Aln Arbor.
The glitter for both groups will
grow this fall as the new Power
Center for the Performing Arts
opens.
Musicals are always popular,
and come in several tarieties.
Soph Show organizes one musical
a year, as does MUSKET; both
groups are sponsored through
University Activities C e n t e r.
Usually their productions are
fairly professional and a lot of
4fun.
The Ann Arbor community of-
fers productions by the Ann Ar-
bor Civic Theatre, including mu-
sicals and dramas, and the Jun-
ior Light Opera is available for
high school enthusiasts. There
is also a Black Theatre of grow-
ing skill which was invited to ap-
pear at the Black Arts Festival
in Detroit this summer.
Several specialty productions
are also annual affairs, like the
Gilbert /tand Sullivan Society's
tribute to the masters. All the
G&S people are true believers,
and their production are usually
pure Joy-and sold out.
The French, Spanish, and Ger-
man departments each present
excellent productions of classic
and modern plays which are

worth attending even if you don't
remember the language very
well. The English department I
may bring in special plays, as it
did with last years "Mankynde,"
a medieval play in Middle Eng-
lish.
What else? New ideas are be-
ing worked on all the time, so
keep your eyes open for posters
and advertisements if you want
to work or see some of what is
going on. There are, very few
places where you can get so much
interesting, innovative, or just
plain excellent theatre.
Foletts bookstore does so
much more for me".

--

Forem~olst fires burn
more than trees.
tit(
OddI

CENTICORE

BOOKSHOP

336 MAYNARD STREET
OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY

. . .........
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