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September 09, 1971 - Image 53

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-9

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, September 9, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Thursday, September 9, ~ 97 ~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

RADICAL THIRD PARTY

Hitting the system

from

By TAMMY JACOBS
Supplement Co-Editor
With both local and federal
elections coming within the next
year, the University community
will be watching with interest
the actions of Ann Arbor's gro-
ing radical third party.
The Radical Independent
Party (RIP), organized last
winter, has already run candi-
dates in two area races, and
promises to play an important
role in the upcoming political
battles.
RIP is the first such p a r t y
since 1968, when the Citizens
for New Politics (CNP) party'
gained a slot on the ballot and
rai candidates in races rang-
ing from University R e g e n t
to President (Eldridge Cleav-
er).
Like the CNP ( which dissolv-
ed after the 1968 elections) RIP
is based on radical politics and

so far has attracted much of
its support from the student
community. CNP had loose ties
with organizations nationwide,
but was predominantly a local
party.
RIP's platform, formulated
by about 100 people in a series
of open conventions in J a n-
uary, reflects radical goals and
proposals on such topics as
ecology, housing and transpor-
tation.
The new party's ranks con-
tain many wellknown campus
radicals who have also been in
other political activities at the
University, and now seem to
have turned from confrontation
politics to electoral politics.
However, party coordinator
Julia Wrigley doesn't feel RIP
is "working within the sys-
tem."
"Having a party outside the
Democrats and Republicans is

The radical third party's convention

attacking the system;" she says.
Within a month after it was
formed, RIP was attacking the
system by campaigning for the
April city-wide elections, f o r
which the party ran write-in
candidates for mayor and se-
cond ward city councilman.

The Ann Arbor spt personality:

Uniersity versi
(Continued from Page 1)
Of even greater concern for the Demo-
crats was the possibility that they would
lose enough council races to make Harris'
veto power ineffective, /because it could be
overturned by eight Republican votes. To
support Harris' veto, the Democrats needed
to win at least two council races.
Despite the retirement of two popular
incumbents, the Democrats won three
seats, enough to protect Harris' veto power
but not enough to retain their majority.
Democratic victories came in the first
three wards among traditional Demicratic
constituencies-blue-collar workers, blacks,
students and young professionals.
The first ward, on Ann Arbor's north
side, houses most of the city's blacks and a
large number of lower-class whites. As ex-
pected liberal Democrat Norris Thomas
easily outdistanced moderate Republican
Edward Rutka.
The race in the second ward, despite its
strong student population, was rated a
toss-up, however.
Incumbent Democrat Bob Faber, per-
haps the most liberal Democrat on the bal-
lot, faced opposition from both the right
and the left. The Radical Independent
Party (RIP) countered with its only coun-
cil candidate, former SGC executive vice-
president Jerry DeGrieck, '72. And the Re-
publicans nominated a tough conservative,
Donald Robinson.
Democrats feared DeGrieck's candidacy

us city polities
would siphon off many student votes, votes
which had elected Faber in an upset vic-
tory in 1969.
Without student support, Faber figured
to be in a close contest with Robinson, who
counted on a big turnout from a bloc of
middle-class white businessmen.
But DeGrieck picked up less than 200
votes, and Faber kept his seat.
The third ward race was also considered
a "swing" race. Some students, young pro-
fessional and upper-class whites make up
the population.
The Democrats ran Nelson Meade, a
party stalwart and a liberal similar to
Harris. The Republicans chose Peter
Wright, also a party regular and a Garris
conservative.
A large Democr'atic turnout made the
difference as Meade defeated Wright.
But the Republicans were not to be de-
nied their new majorit .
Republicans Richard Hadler and John
McCormick knocked off their Demicratic
challengers in the fourth and fifth wards,
respectively.
Both wards are mostly middle and lower-
middle class' areas, typical of many me-
dium midwestern towns.
Victories there gave the Republicans a
6-5 edge on the council.
But many observers believe liberals still
have control of the council. The reason is
Robert Weaver, a second ward Republican
who has voted several times with the Dem-
ocrats.

Doug Cornell, RIP candidate
for mayor, gleaned only 53 vot-
es as compared with 15,789 for
the victor, Democratic incum-
bent Robert Harris and 11,158
for right-wing Republican can-
didate Jack Garris.
However, RIP had announc-
ed that Cornell's campaign
was for "educational purposes,"
and agreed that Cornell was not
a serious contender for mayor.
His role, rather, was to make
-the radical party's views known
at debates between the candi-
dates and at campaign speeches.
The party's one candidate for
City Council, Jerry DeGrieck
was the focus of most of t h e
party's serious vote-getting ef-
forts. DeGrieck ran in the se-
cpnd ward, an area inhabited
predominantly by students. He
lost to Democratic candidate
Robert Faber by a large margin,
with Republican Donald Robin-
son coming in second.
RIP officials and others have
said that Faber "came in on
Harris' coattails" and that De-
Grieck would have made a far
better showing if people had not
felt pressured by Republican
Garris' right-wing politics to
vote for the "lesser of two evils,"
the straight Democratic ticket.
Quick to recover from defeat,
RIP ran Psychology Prof. Ro-
bert Hefner in the city school
board elections in June. Since
the elections were technically
non-partisan, Hefner rated a
place on the ballot, unlike t h e
April elections where only the
two main parties were repre-
sented and RIP's candidates
were write-in choices.
Of the 12 candidates f o r
school board, the three elected
were conservatives. However,
out of 6,000 voters (each with
three votes), Hefner gleaned
1,700 votes, and RIP seemed to
be gaining stature among the
voting community.
RIP, as one of its goals, h a s
vowed to try to grow from a

ith'in
predominantly campus-b a s e d
party into one with a wider
range. According to Wrigley,
the school board race signified
a step in this direction.
"Students voted for us," in
that race, she says, "but not
that many students voted. We
leafletted not just the student
wards, but the entire city, and
got votes in all the areas we
concentrated on."
For the next few months, the
party will be concentrating on
twin goals of getting on the
ballot for next year's elections,
and registering potential vot-
ers in the 18 to 21 year old age
group, which, RIP feels, will
contain a large amount of sup-
port for the radical party.
For most of its existence, RIP
has been trying to get its name
on the ballot for local elections,
along with the two major par-
ties.
In the spring, Harris appoint-
ed a "Citizen's Commission on
Third Parties and Related Mat-
ters," and by late June they
had formulated a proposal say-
ing that if a third party g o t
signatures amounting to one
per cent of the votes going to
the victor of the last mayoral
election, that party would earn
a place on the ballot.
From the commission, the pro-
posal was to go to City Coun-
cil, to the governor for ruling
on whether it was technologi-
cally valid, and to a November
city-wide referendum.
RIP officials are optimistic
about the chances to be on next
year's ballot but throughoutnthe
summer and fall will concen-
trate on registering youthful
voters.
If there is an 18 year - old
vote in Michigan by the No-
vember referendum, RIP mem-
bers are confident that it will
pass. After that, under 200 sig-
natures stand between RIP and
its place on the ballot.
Important considerations that
faced RIP during the summer
and are bound to appear again
in the future involve whether to
ally with state or national third
party organizations.
T.. RENTALS
10.50/mo.
NEJAC T.V.
662-5671

By CHRIS PARKS
Increasingly, with the growth
of such organization as the Radi-
cal Independent Party, students
are coming to feel they have
more at stake in Ann Arbor elec-
tions than in those of their for-
mer home towns.
State residency requirements,
however, make registering to
vote by students in the city rath-
er difficult.
While the basic residency re-
quirement stipulates only that the
city be the place where the appli-
cants spends the majority of the
year, a special section of the
state law singles out .studeits
along with a few other groups as
neither "gaining nor losing" resi-
dency due to their special status.
This means that student do not
of necessity lost their right to
register in their home towns be-
cause they are in Ann Arbor, but
on the other hand they do not
gain the right to register here be-
cause they go to school here.
Students often see their home
town as something remote, or in
the past, which bears little rele-
vance to their present lives.
Living in Ann Arbor, lhcy are
directly affected by the decisions

of the local governmnent arind
many feel they should haxe a
voice in that government.
The peculiarities of the state
law, have led to the establish-
ment of special and more string-
ent voter registration rules for
students in Ann Arbor and other
college towns.
When a student attempts to rel.
ister in Ann Arbor, he will -
asked standard questions such as
place of residence, and the
amount of the year spent at that
address.
Because he is a student, how-
ever, he will be asked a fur-
ther set of questions, devised by
city clerk Harold Saunders.
The student will be asked the
extent to which he is supported
by his parents, whether he is,
married, if he intends to return
home following graduation, if he
is employed in Ann Arbor, and
where he spends his summer
vacations.
In general, the more quesicnm
show permanence in Ann Arbor
and financial independence, the
better the chances of a student
being considered a resident.
Rather than a specific formula
for such questions, however,

Voter registration in Ann Arbor:
Life is hard if you're a student

Saunders says he takes the gen-
eral trend of the answers and
makes a judgment as to whether
the student is a qualified resident
under the rather vague state
definition.
Sometimes; Saunders explains,
"it's a question of whether I b.-
lieve the guy."
Efforts are underway to change
the present situation, however.
Cases are pending before the
state and the national supreme
courts challenging the special re-
strictions placed upon students.
Further, a bill at present pend-
ing before the State Legislature
would establish uniform guide-
lines governing qualifications
necessary for registration.
For the present, however, whe-
ther or not a student can regis-
ter remains up to the city clerk.
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University

Musical

Society

A VARIETY
OF ATTRACTIONS
from
15 COUNTRIES

INTERNATIONAL PRESENTATIONS-1971-1972

IN HILL AUDITORIUM
Choral Union Series
ARTURO BENEDITTI MICHELANGELI, Pianist .........Monday, October 4
RUGGIERO RICCI, Violinist..... ........... . ....Monday, November 8
SHIRLEY VERRETT, Mezzo-Soprano ................ Thursday, November 18
CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA......................Wednesday, December 8
PIERRE BOULEZ, Conductor+
ANDRES SEGOVIA, Guitarist ....... .. ...........Saturday, January 22
JACQUELINE DU PRE, Cellist.......................Friday, February 11
PRAGUE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA .................. Sunday, February 27
JINDRICH ROHAN, Conductor
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA . Tuesday, March 14
WILLIAM STEINBERG, Conductor
VIENNA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 2:30, Sunday, March 19
JOSEF KRIPs, Conductor
MINNESOTA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA...... . ...........Sunday, April 9
STANISLAW SKROWACZEWSKI, Conductor
SEASON TICKETS: $35.00-$30.00-$25.00-$20.00-$15.00
SINGLE CONCERTS (on sale beginning Sept. 20)
$7.00-$6.50-$6.00-$5.00-$3.50-$2.50
Annual Christmas Concerts
"MESSIAH" (Handel) -Three performances:
Fri., Dec. 3, and Sat., Dec. 4 at 8:30
Sun., Dec. 5 at 2:30
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION AND SOLOISTS
MEMBERS OF THE INTERLOCHEN ARTS ACADEMY ORCHESTRA
DONALD BRYANT, Conductor
TICKETS: $4.00-$3.00-$2.50-$2.00-$1.50

IN RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
Chamber Arts Series
PRO CANTIONE ANTIQUA from London ............. Monday, October 11
SAAR CHAMBER ORCHESTRA .............. .......Tuesday, October 26
ANTONIO JANIGRO, Conductor
CONCENTUS MUSICUS from Vienna .......... . ..... Saturday, November 6
PRAGUE STRING QUARTET ....................Tuesday, November 16
BERLIN OCTET .............................. . .... Friday, January 28
OSCAR GHIGLIA, Guitar, and
FRANS BRUEGGEN, Recorder ....... ...... . . Wednesday, February 23
BOSTON SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS ... ........ Monday, March 13
SEASON TICKETS: $25.00-$20.00-$12,00
SINGLE CONCERTS (on sale beginning Sept. 20) : $5.00-$4.00-$2.50
East Asian Series,
EDO FESTIVAL OF MUSIC AND PANTOMIME .......... Friday, October 29
Japanese troup in sacred music and masque dances
P'ANSORI, music of legends from Korea .... .:.. ...... . Friday, February 25
Kim So-Hee, singer, with musicians, all titled "cultural treasures"

IN THE NEW
POWER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS
MAKE YOUR OWN
Choice Series
Choose any four or eight attractions for special series price
This selective list will be curtailed after July I
MARCEL MARCEAU-a style Pantomimist from Paris.Fri., Oct. 15
Sat., Oct. 16
SIERRA LEONE NATIONAL DANCE COMPANY,
from Africa . ............... . ..... ....... Sat., Oct. 30
ROYAL WINNIPEG BALLET from Canada................I Wed., Nov. 10
SWINGLE SINGERS from Paris ................ ........ Fri., Npv, 19
Classical and Jazz improvisations

CHORICA-Dance Theater Company from Athens ...
Directed by Zouzou Nicoloudi (two different programs)
Choreography interwoven with speech and music in excerpts
from Ancient Greek tragedies, comedies, satyric dramas,
Byzantine liturgical dramas.

Sat., Nov.
Sun., Nov.

20
21

NATIONAL BALLET of Washngton, D.C. ...... .
"Cinderella"-full production, music by Prokofieff

(3:00 p.m.) Sat., Nov. 27

PARIS CHAMBER ORCHESTRA... . .. ................Mon., Jan. 17
Paul Kuentz, Conductor
With Choral Union singers, Donald Bryant, Conductor.Wed., Jan. 19
HERMAN PREY, baritone, in lieder recital ..... ........Thurs., Feb. 17
JULIAN BREAM, guitarist and lutenist, from London..........Wed., March 1
AN ENTERTAINMENT FOR ELIZABETH.................Sun., April 16
New York Pro Musicia's full production
Attractions subject to change.
SPECIAL SUBSCRIPTION PRICES*
FOUR EVENTS: $25.00-$20.00-$16.00-$12.Od
EIGHT EVENTS: $50.00-$40.00-$32.00-$24.00
Write or call before ordering series tickets, since
tickets for some dates may be limited

SHANTUNG TRADITIONAL MUSIC, from China . . .... . Friday, April 7
Lu Sheng ensemble of the cheng, p'i-p'a, and the nan-hu
SEASON TICKETS: $8.00-$6 50-$4.00
CI f' C ^1I!C~~ - .1. .. : r.. _..01¬ęC AT r OG

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