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September 09, 1971 - Image 52

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-9

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, September 9, 1971

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, September 9, 1971

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Students and

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U L B I C H'S
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By JONATHAN MILLER
When a constable's duty to be done,
the policeman's lot is not a happy one,
goes the British song.
In Ann Arbor, 1971, the lot of the po-
liceman is still, many times, unhappy.
Drugs, armed robberies, student demon-
strators; all combine to give the man
on the beat a thoroughly rough time.
To the students and young people
of the city, the p o li c e are often the
cause of much unhappiness themselves.
Relations between the city's young peo-
ple and the police range from bad to
terrible.
Occasionally, when the police depart-
ment goes through one of its periodic
ticket-writing and drug-busting phases,
relations between the two groups be-
come unbearable, and rather than face
a confrontation, a quiet halt to law en-
forcement is declared by command of-
ficers.
Now, however, despite this cooling of
arrest procedures, the situation between
the city police and local young people
remains tense. Many observers feel that
young people on the streets are more
bitter now than at any previous time
in the city's recent history a situation
mainly due to high unemployment
among high school aged students.
According to Police Chief Walter
Krasny, one of the department's main

Walking the university beat

second visited by the raiding party .in a
two-hour time span that day.
The year has four more months to
run, and though there have been no
more arrests or raids on such a large
scale, the residual bad feelings between
the police and youth remain.
"Just when we thought we had it so
the police would leave pot alone and we
could begin to cooperate with them on
solving the heroin problem, they went
and blew it," observed one disgruntled
youth after the Ann Arbor Argus raid.
But the Argus commune is not the
residence of a typical University stu-
dent. Examples of such heavy police
surveillance ultimately leading to pp-
lice intervention and arrests have been
confined to the Argus commune, possi-
bly one group of heroin dealers and sev-
eral members of the radical White Pan-
ther Party.
Ann Arbor's police department, while
ranked among the top three in the na-
tion in a recent Federal Bureau of In-
vestigation study is apparently either
unready, or unwilling to embark upon
full-scale mass arrests of students for
sale of marijuana.
Arrests for possession of marijuana
are more frequent amongst the mem-
bers of the student community, but as
one detective admits, "ninety per cent

Isy line.
of the possession busts are made by the
uniformed division."
Checks of cars. and shakedown
searches of individuals for weapons
often reveal a small bag of marijuana
in a coat pocket or lying on the passen-
ger seat of an automobile.
To the student who can avoid such a
random search-which is not too diffi-
cult if one remembers his common
sense and locks doors-the only remain-
ing difficulty could arise when the stu-
dent is in campus demonstrations.
It is at such affairs that circum-
stances change dramatically, shifting
the odds to make direct confrontation
between students and police probable.
The University administration has
not shown itself overly reticent to use
police to quell campus disturbances, and
literally dozens and dozens of students
have gone through the courts on
charges stemming from sit-ins, strikes,
job recruiter "lock-ins" and assorted
assaults.
Generally, however, as long as stu-
dents keep to themselves, avoid dealing
dope, ride their bikes on right side of
the street, park their cars in the right
spots at the right times, and avoid at-
tending campus demonstrations, con-
tact with Ann Arbor's police should be
minimal.

Phone 764-0558 to Subscribe to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

troubles is that "nobody gives us the
cooperation we need. For instance, if
people would tell us when their kids
are smoking pot, we could get to the
big pushers. Instead, nobody seems to
know anything."
Indeed, if there is a single cause for
the animousity between the police and
young people-it is dope.
The police are unable to bust the big
pushers, of grass, LSD, heroin or any-
thing else, and yet all around them
thousands of kids are getting high. One
of the cities' largest pushers estimates
that "at least 1,000 lbs of marijuana is
smoked a week in Ann Arbor."

Even Krasny agrees with the esti-
mate, but the biggest haul made by his
department so far this year was just
over, 175 lbs.
The police can and do "rent" Michi-
gan State Police undercover officers to
seek out illicit suppliers of narcotics.
One such officer, Terry Beiday, was -the
"narc" who last February led raids
against a number of politically radical
communes, resulting in a dozen ar-
rests and the near death of the Ann
Arbor Argus, a radical "youth culture"

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Campus and community: The
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People, especially young people, can be arrested in Ann
Arbor for almost any reason. Often the police will not tell
you - though they should - what they are holding you on.
In the event that you are apprehended by the police, the
following criteria should apply.
If while you are driving you see a squad car flashing
its light behind you, don't lost your composure. Pull off the
road, get out of your car and lock it. The police cannot
search your ,car without a warrant. If he has stopped you
for a driving violation, be prepared to wait several minutes-
while he checks out your record via radio for any unpaid
tickets or outstanding offenses.
If you are stopped and detained by a policeman on
the street you should ask him if you are free to go. If he says
yes, then go. If he says no or does not answer then you are
under arrest.
The officer is supposed to read to you the so-called
"Miranda Warning." which is the blurb that tells you what
your rights are.
A recent supreme court decision held that anything you
say before the Miranda warning is read to you can be ad-
missible into evidence if used to contradict later testimony.
You have the right to make a telephone call, so when
you make it be certain the person you are calling is going to
act on the call. There is nothing more frustrating than
sitting in jail wondering when the lawyer is going to show up.
Never resist arrest. Even if the arrest itself is illegal,
your resisting makes the officer immune from prosecution
for false arrest. Convictions simply for resisting arrest are
possible.
Learn your legal rights. Courses in legal self defense are
offered through the Course Mart program of the Literary
College and the Free University.

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By JONATHAN MILLER
By far the most abused drug in
the city is tobacco and alcohol
is a close second, but to those in-
terested in other types of thrills,
a wide variety of illegal drugs are
usually easily obtainable on the
Ann Arbor black market.
The most dangerous of such
drcgs, experts say, is heroin.
Known to the Ann Arbor junkie
community as "smack," heroin
can be readily obtained outside
P.J.'s restaurant on State Street
and through a small network of
dealers.
Estimates of the number of
heroin users in the city are sim-
ply conjecture, experts say. For
a time, a figure of 700 was ban-
died about, but some physicians
close to the problem feel this
figure much too high.
Few of the addicts or users are
students; heroin abuse in the
city seems to fall close to a na-
tional pattern of high use among
young, unemployed, black males.
This conclusion was recently
borne out in a study of addicts
at the county's methadone treat-
ment clinic, Octagon House.
Marijuana however is another
story. Observers state that the
only factor governing the rate
of consumption of marijuana is
the availability of the weed.
"If there's dope, there's people
to smoke it at almost any price,"
says one smiling dealer.
Hallucinogens - LSD, mesca-
line, peyote - are seemingly
"leveling off" however. "It's
down from the high point of two
years ago," notes one local -phy-
sician.
Alcohol is prevalent on cam-
pus. Health service reports see-
ing many students suffering
from alcoholism, but doctors
there see no rise in the rate of

Pushers on the streets

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affliction: "It's been pretty
steady for a few years now," says
one.
One inducement for the student
drug user or abuser is' the unlike-
lihood of being caught. Pot smok-
ing in the dorms is common, ex-
cept where there are tough-
minded corridor advisors.
Some students even report
smoking pot with their corridor
advisors.
University housing rules per-
mit alcohol in dormitories for
students -over 21 - which makes
enforcement of a no-imbibing
policy nearly impossible. To
make sure the kids are supplied,
every dormitory has self-ap-
pointed liquor dealers to give aid
and comfort to those under the
legal age.
Amphetamines, seemingly a
constant problem, are widely
used by students as study aids,'
though doctors are becoming in-
creasingly disturbed about ad-
verse effects caused by the drugs.
Drug education programs com-
. prise the main thrust of the Uni-

versity's attack on the student
drcg problem. Dormitory semi-
nars, featuring medical student
counselling,' are on every dormi-
tory calendar.
Increased independence in ,the
University environment often
proves too much for some stu-
dents however, and problems of
adverse LSD reactions, ampheta-
mine overdoses and adverse re-
actions to marijuana and alcohol
are common on campus.
Not all freshman attend the
drug education seminars, how-
ever, and after the freshman year
most students do not live in the
dormitories.
Although University counselling
services endeavor to help a stu-
dent once a crisis with drug
abuse has been reached, critics
of the University's programs say
that effective prevention of abuse
difficulties is still unrealized.
Drug Help, a crisis clinic for
local youths, reports many cases
of University students with drug
problems coming to them for
help.

K
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MICHIG ENRBOOK STORE
STATE STREET AT NORTH UNIVERSITY 9 ANN ARBOR

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DISCO VEF

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f
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SSI
A-, 17o-
70 8 j-
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(Continued from Page 5)
along the polluted Huron Riv-
er, but when the sun is shining
and the trees green it is nice.
Watch out for thoughtless auto-
mobilists.
THE BOTANICAL GARDENS
offer both large green house
and three marked hiking trails.
The green house has crawly
vines, flowers, and fifteen mil-
lion varieties of cacti. A spec-
ial' feature is the display of
"stone plants."
Signs on the hiking trails
warn you to not wander be-
cause of poisonous snakes and
plants. The trails do follow
the creeks and lakes, but o f f
the trails is welcome isolation
and an illusion of unkept na-
ture.

The Gardens are perhaps the
best place in the area to picnic,
and if you can make it o u t
there often enough, you can
find a few off trail places to
hide from most people except a
few lost botanists.
The Gardens are south of
Dixboro on Dixboro road, east
of Ann Arbor.
There are other places, b u t
most require time and motorized
transport to-reach. If you are
rich or lucky enough to have a
motorcycle or car, Washtenaw
County offers a number of hilly
country roads f with beautiful
scenic farm lands.
And if you don't have a car
or cycle, there are always the
athletic fields near the Intra-
mural Building or Palmer field
on the Hill.

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