100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 03, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, November 3, 1971

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, November 3, 1971

ANTI WAR VETERANS
Focus your energies with us in follow-up activities
to the halftime show.
Organizational Meeting TODAY

OTT TRIUMPHS:
N etmen

battle

in

Nov. 3

8:00 P.M.

Rm. 3540 SAB

VIETNAM VETERANS AGAINST THE WAR

NOON BOOK DISCUSSION
THU RSDAY
3545 Student Activities Bldg.
THE GREETING OF AMERICA
reviewed by Vice Pres. Knauss
Next Week
THE TEACHINGS OF DON JUAN,
THE YAQU I WAY OF KNOWLEDGE
OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS
Michigan Union, 3rd floor
s.. Security Guards,
Supervisors
BURNS INTERNATIONAL SECURITY SERVICES, INC., the
world's leading private security agency, is seeking full and part-
time security guards for employment in the Ann Arbor and sur-
rounding areas. All applicants must be 21 years of age or older,
and rust be able to pass a strict background investigation which
will include pre-employment and criminal record checks. Those
applicants selected for employment will receive training and in-
struction in physical and personal safety techniques, first aid,
fire fighting and prevention, parking and traffic control, interior
and exterior security techniques, pass and badge procedures and
other special. training applicable to the, assignment, as well as
extensive on-the-job training.
Applicants selected will receive premium wages and fringe bene-
fits. Those having a particularly impressive security background
will be given special consideration for supervisory positions.
Applcants seeking full and part-time employment with excellent
working conditions, and freedom from worry of seasonal layoffs,
must apply at:
208 E. Washington
Suite 201
Phone 662-4554
Ann Arbor, Michigan
between the hours of 9 A.M. to 4 P.M.,
starting Tuesday, October 26, 1971
An Equal Opportunity Employer
BURNS
INTERNATIONAL
SECURITY
SERVICES, INC.

By RANDY PHILLIPS
Sundrenched, golden-skinned
people in Ann Arbor-in No-
vember yet? Naw, that's sheer
nonsense; not in Ann Arbor, the
center of research, fine football,
and precipitation. But there are
a few people like that around
these days, and included among
them are the Wolverine Tennis
players.
Due to an unusually warm
and sunny fall, Michigan's net-
ters have had the opportunity
to work outside daily and stay
competitive. Coach Brian Eisner
is attributing a general improve-
ment of play in his team partly
to this factor.
But a perhaps more conclusive
reason for Eisner's satisfaction
with the fall phase of workouts
can be traced to the appearance
We Don't Core
What You Do
With the Money
You Save on
Student Supplies
at
FOLLETTS
Just Spend
it Madly!

of a few new freshman faces
filling the courts. Jeff Miller,
Jerry Karzen, and Guy Ilalaole
are all threatening to displace
one of the five returning start-
ers off of last year's Big Ten
championship team.
Miller and Karzen are strong
contenders for one of the top
three singles spots as they were
ranked 19th and 20th in the
preliminary national rankings of
junior players. Ilalaole, coming
from far off Honolulu, could
also break into the starting line-
up.
The fall phase of workouts
has nearly been completed.
Emphasis has been placed on
keeping the sharp competitive
edge gained last season and
through the summer tourna-
ment circuit.
To accomplish this goal, Eis-
ner initiated two round-robin
challenge tournaments. The first
tournament included the five
returning starters and Miller,
Karzen, and Ilalaole. Joel Ross
is trying to retain his hold on
the first position where he cap-
tured the Big Ten Singles crown
last year, and Mike Ware, Big
Ten champ at no. 6 is strug-
gling to keep his starting role.
Also returning are Tim Ott (no.
2), Dick Ravreby (no. 3), and
Kevin Senich (no. 5). The lone
graduate was captain and con-
ference titlist Ramone Almonte
(no. 4).
The second tournament in-
cludes the remaining members
of last year's team and any
walk-ons. This second chal-
lenge round serves the dual pur-
pose of slimming down the
squad to the acceptable num-
ber of 12. Randy Toig, return-
ing from last year has won all
his matches in this round while
walk-ons Steve Montross and
Ed Johnson have won two
matches each to cop a place on

the squad. The remaining open-
ing is being fought out between
returnees Rick Teretsky, Bob
Epstein, and injured Andy Gel-
ler.
With only one match remain-
ing in the first tournament, Tim
Ott has taken the lead with a
6-1 record. Ott has been "play-
ing very well, has great power,
and is quick," says Eisner. Joel
Ross has come through with a
good 5-2 record and has tem-
porary control of the second
slot.
Miller is living up to his cre-
dentials with a 4-2 record with
one match remaining against Il-
alaole. Miller has looked im-
pressive in several matches in-
cluding wins over Ross and
Karzen.
Dick Ravreby is holding even
against newcomer Karzen with
a 4-3 mark. But Ravreby had a
painful experience about three
weeks ago. The junior from
California twisted his back and
obtained a severe muscle spasm
while serving in a match against
Miller. Ravreby had to be hos-
pitalized and could barely walk
for three days.
Senich, Ware, and Ilalaole in
that order complete the list for
the first tournament.
Closeness has marked the en-
tire tournament as m a n y
matches were stretched to three
sets. Eisner remarked, "The
very closeness of the matches
themselves did go as expected.
I felt the ability levels of all
the players were very close."
The advantages of such sharp
competition is two fold. Eisner
explained, "It's good from the
team standpoint; it forces every
one to keep on improving. It
also gives us good overall
depth."
But the Michigan mentor add-
ed, "We still have a long way
to go; Indiana (last year's sec-
ond place conference team) has
brought in a number of fresh-
men which will mnake their

e
iractice
team better, so we'll have to im-
prove to stay ahead."
The second phase of practice
now begins indoors, as the inev-
itable drearyness engulfs the
campus. This portion of prac-
tice will stress technique work
(specific problems of individual
players) and conditioning.
Eisner, a self-made whiz with
the camera, has taken films of
his players during matches and
will use theme films to point out
a players' weaknesses. Light
weight lifting will .be used to
strengthen the arms and wrists.
Strength in these areas is ex-
tremely important since match-
es between good performers
generally go three sets. This
strength and endurance is need-
ed for difficult volleys and long
service games.
It seems apparent now that
the Wolverines will be at least
as strong as last season when
they copped the conference
crown. The depth will be im-
proved and the top of the squad
may be stronger. But the ques-
tion still remains if whether the
Wolverines can muster enough
strength at the top of their
line-up to pose a serious chal-
lenge to the national powers.

-Associated Press

Fresh new snow
NO, it is not Daily Libel All-American Gorrilla Greer demonstrat-
ing the slickness of the Miami Orange Bowl's Poly Turf to a cur-
rent congressional hearing on artificial surfaces. Rather it is
Steven Hall Jr. of Seattle who is enjoying the opening of the ski
season in the Pacific Northwest where 40 inches of snow has fallen.

Ruggers season starts swiftly,
injuries slow team's momentum

State St. at North Univ.

By CHUCK DRUKIS
The Michigan Rugby football
club has had a frustrating season
despite rather impressive won and
lost records. The Blue team has
struggled to a 5-3 record while the
Gold and Maize stand at 6-2 and
4-1, respectively.
The Blue started the 1971 fall
season with a big victory over
Detroit. The backs successfully
controlled the ball for Michigan
on their way to a 37-6 win.

TO ALL STUDENTS
WHO PARTICIPATED IN
GRAD II
Comnuterixed Job Onnortunitv

I

% pu erer' pp 5y
Matching Program
Your printout results are now available. Please pick them up at:
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3rd Floor-Student Activities Bldg.
764-7460
A second GRAD 11 computer run will be made in late December
or early January. Watch Daily Official Bulletin or check with
our office the week of November 22 for deadline date.

a

Knee keeps Reed out longer*
Dallas discards kicker Clark
By The Associated Press
* NEW YORK - Center Willis Reed will be out of the New
York Knicks' lineup longer than expected because of tendonitis in
his left knee, the National Basketball Association club announced
yesterday.
Reed, who has missed one game so far this season, was expected
to return to action Friday in Seattle but now will fly to Los Angeles
Saturday to consult with Dr. Robert Kerlan, an orthopedic specialist,
the Knicks said.
* * *
" DALLAS - The Dallas Cowboys activated kicking specialist
Toni Fritsch of Austria yesterday and placed veteran Mike Clark,
who missed three field goal attempts against Chicago Sunday in a
23-19 loss, to the taxi squad.
Clark missed three field goals inside the 40-yard line against the
Bears and Coach Tom Landry said, "with a good kicking game we
would have been all right."
* NEW YORK - Sometimes the best laid plans go awry and
players like San Diego quarterback John Hadl end up as The As-
sociated Press' Offensive Player of the Week in the National Football
League.
The Chargers said they hadn't expected to pass so much against
the New York Jets, but they said it after Hadl had completed 19 of
27 passes for 358 yards and four touchdowns in a 49-21 rout of the
Jets last Sunday.
SAnn Arbor Antique Show "I
6780 JACKSON RD., ANN ARBOR
5 mi. west of dou)ntown (I-94 exit Zeeb Rd. to.
Jackson Rd. and west 1 mile)
SPECIAL GUN SHOWj
NOV. 6-7-HOURS 9 to 6
plus many other special and
interesting antiques and collectibles4
A BIG SHOW. A BIG PLACE4
Ample parking-door prizes0
small admission charge!.
for more info: 517-869-2414
h Ieneneemnmn

Michigan encountered some un-
expected tough competition from
Cleveland, but nevertheless, inch-
ed out a 6-4 victory.
The ruggers then rolled to two
surprisingly easy victories over
Toronto and Chicago, two tradi-
tionally outstanding rugby clubs.
But then the tide turned. The
Blue encountered a fired up Mich-
igan State team in East Lansing
and dropped a stunning 4-3 de-
cision to the Spartans.
Seemingly recovering from the
initial loss, the Blue rolled up
their fifth triumph, this time vic-
timizing Notre Dame 26-9.
But again disaster struck as
the following week the Blue ran
into a plethora of mistakes while
dropping two contests, one each
against Palmer College and Chi-
cago.
Throughout' the season, Michi-
gan had considered the game
against Palmer as the most im-
portant one to win. However, Pal-
mer, rated by some as the third
best rugby club in the club be-
hind UCLA and Stanford, with-
stood the barrage of Michigan's
offensive thrusts in the second
half to preserve a 7-3 victory.
The remainder of the season

consists of three games against
Big Ten teams. This Saturday
the ruggers will host the Indiana
Hoosiers before playing their final
road game of the year at Purdue
next Saturday.
In the season finale, Michigan
will play Ohio State at home.
Captain Terry Larrimer is gen-
erally pleased with the perform-
ance to date. But Larrimer also
pointed out several shortcomings.
First he expressed his disappoint-
ment in losing to Palmer. "Sec-
ond," said Larrimer, "I'm dis ap-
pointed at the performance of
some of our older and more ex-
perienced players."
Larrismer is looking forward to
the rest of the season with high
expectations. However, he also
pointed to a rising problem. "In-
juries are starting to catch up to
us. (Ryk) Ward, (Dick) Moon, and
(Pete) Hooper just to name a few
are amongst those now injured."
The ruggers will play three
games this weekend. The Indiana-
Michigan Blue' game Saturday will
tentatively start at 11:30 on Pal-
mer Field followed by the Indi-
ana-Gold game. The Maize will
travel to Windsor on Sunday to
play the Windsor Old Crocks.

01

INDUSTRY SQUAWKS:
SFake grass upheld

WASHINGTON (/P) - Pound-
ing his fist into a sample of Astro-
turf to demonstrate its resiliency,
a Monsanto Co. official said yes-
terday football injuries are just
part of the game and should not
be blamed on artificial turf.
"Football, no matter where it
is played, is a violent contact
sport," said Gene Troy. "For the
most part, football injuries have
been accepted by the players as
an uncomfortable by-product of
participation in the game."
But an official of another com-
U-M STUDENT
BLOOD BANK
Tues., Nov. 2-11-5
Wed., Nov. 3--1-
at: First Floor
Michigan Union
Info: Call 76-Guide
GIVE
A
LITTLE

pany that also makes synthetic
surfaces said the turf "should be
examined as an element" in foot-
ball injuries.
"The entire subject of athletic
injuries is an extremely complex
one that involves a host of vari-
ables of which synthetic turf Is'or
may be one of the variables," said
James F. Higgins of the 3M
Company, manufacturer of Tar-
tan Turf.
"Synthetic turf does not ac-
celerate or extend the rate of in-
jury," Troy said. "To the con-
trary, data and information from
our customers indicate that se-
vere injuries occur with less fre-
quency on our product than on
natural grass.'
On Monday, the sub-committee
was told artificial turf caused
"abrasions, staphylococcus infec-
tions, increased knee and ankle in-
juries, heat prostration and pos-
sibly fractures and concussions be-
cause of the hardness of the foun-
dation beneath the playing sur-
face."
Dr. James Garrick of the Uni-
versity of Washington saidha sur-
vey he conducted showed an in-
jury rate on synthetic turfs 50
per cent higher than that on
grass.
Troy disputed Garrick's find-
ings and said other aspects of the
game, not artificial turf, should
be under investigation.
"We have engineered our sys-
tem to be as safe as we can make
it." he said. "However, we cannot
control the style of play, the pro-
tective equipment and footwear
used or the conditioning, attitude
and coaching of the players in-
volved,"

4f

YANKEE PEDDLER

4

Typewriters
Televisions
Tape Recorders
Guitars
Sewing Machines
Appliances

Stereos
Radios
Cameras
Albums
Furniture
Clothing

------. . __._._- ._ ___ .1

6'
0
, fJlh . -01

GRAD COFFEE HOUR
TODAY

I

11

11

11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan