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October 31, 1971 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-31

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SHOWCASE PRODUCTIONS
joe orton
What the Butler Saw
THURS., FRI., SAT. EVES. AT 8:00
Arena Box Office in TRUEBLOOD Theatre
MONDAY, 2-5, Season Tickets only $8, $4
Single and season sles Tues., Wed., 2-5; Th-Sat., 2-8E
Single tickets at $1 .00 and $1 .50j

NEWS PRONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

aI P

AP 41P
tr4t n

a- at'ly

page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Sunday, October 31, 1971

By The Associated Press
TONS OF MUD and slag rolled over houses and buildings
at a mining center in Romania's Transylvania coal country early
yesterday.
According to official reports 45 persons were killed and about
90 injured.
Investigators reporting to central government officials in Bucha-
rest said a facility for containing the slag gave way.
No explanation was given for the collapse, which occurred be-j
fore sunrise yesterday morning. Rescue workers, including army
teams, labored through the day and into the night hunting for bodies.
* * *

'TEACHER' DEFEATED

U.N.

Week

toasts

U.S. loss

Held Over
AGAIN!

DIAL 8-6416
Shows "
At 1-3-5-7-9

IHELLSTROM CHRONICLE
ONE NIGHT ONLY
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1
AT THE
ALLEY CINEMA
JAMES DEAN in
REBEL WITHOUT
A CAUSE
Dir. Nicholas Ray, 1955. Also starring Natalie
Wood, Nick Adams, Sal Mineo, Dennis Hopper.
SHOWS AT 7 & 9:30 $1.00
330 Maynard
COMING TUES.-Bergman's The Seventh Seal

FRANCE AND RUSSIA have signed a joint declaration pro-
mising that their "active collaboration" will be a "permanet fac-
tor in international life."
However, yesterday's pronouncement fell short of the friendship
treaty Communist party chief Leonid Brezhnev wanted when he ar-
rived in France last Monday.
In a separate communique, Brezhnev and French president
Georges Pompidou called for the convening of a European security
conference next year, immediate resumption of the Gunnar Jarring
peace mission in the Mideast, the settlement of tensions on the In-
dian subcontinent, and an end to foreign intervention in Indochina.
French spokesmen said the declaration did not compromise
France's relations with NATO or West Germany.
Immediately after the signing ceremony, Brezhnev flew to East
Berlin for talks with East German officials.
SOUTH VIETNAMESE PRESIDENT NGUYEN VAN THIEU
will take the oath of office today in Saigon as barbed wire and
hundreds of combat police guard the square where the inaugural
ceremony will occur.
Thieu's inauguration will be attended by South Vietnamese
government officials, top military commanders and foreign digni-
taries, including Secretary of the Treasury John Connally.
One square mile of downtown Saigon has been closed to traffic
for the event, and 40,000 troops and police stand by as a security
force for Saigon and its suburbs.
PRESIDENT NIXON AND YUGOSLAVIA'S PRESIDENT
TITO issued a joint communique yesterday noting the importance
of non-aligned nations in international relations and the need for
"firm peace and true security" in all of Europe.
The communique marked the end of two days of meetings be-
tween the two men at the White House. Noting Yugoslavia's policy of
non-alignment, Nixon said that countries following such a policy
can make an active contribution to the resolution of world problems."
SAN FRANCISCO MAYOR JOSEPH ALIOTO'S tough City
Hall style faces a crucial test in Tuesday's mayoral election, an
11-candidate race in which the main issue has been the quality
of life in San Francisco.
While Alioto says that the city needs a leader with "toughness
of spirit" and "toughness of mind," one of his main challengers,
Board, of Supervisors President Diane Feinstein, claims it is time to
show sensitivity, rather than toughness, to the city's residents and
their problems.
Meanwhile, another competitor, former supervisor Harold
Dobbs has warned that "the problems we've seen wreck Eastern cities
are going to devastate our own San Francisco."

i

-Associated Pressf
Tito in U.S.
President Tito of Yugoslavia is pictured after talks with Presi-
dent Nixon. The two leaders issued a joint message on the im-
portance of non-aligned nations (See News Briefs).
AFTER MARKET VOTE:
13ritain's Laborites
con ront party crisis

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (R) - Officially it was TJnited
Nations Week, but something else was being celebrated when
delegates danced in the aisles of the General Assembly.
They reminded onlookers of pupils who had just put one
over on teacher. Perhaps they had. The United States had
suffered a serious diplomatic defeat on the issue of China
representation.
For many U.N. members-certainly for the Americans-
there seemed little to inspire celebration.
On the Asian subcontinent, a war threat boiled up and
made the United Nations seem, for the moment at least, un-
convincing in the role of protector of peace.
In the Middle East, both Arabs and Israelis criticized
American peace efforts.
Moscow's top leaders pushed a major offensive of diplo-
matic tourism, sparked in part by suspicion of both Chinese
and American intentions.
But American policy, despite the U.N. buffeting, con-
tinued on a course charted for the 1970s, aimed 'at detent
with China and lessened Soviet-
U.S. tensions. The White House
announced President Nixon's visit
to China will come after the turn
of the year, in advance of his
Moscow trip.
Would events of U.N. Week in-
side and outside the world or-
ganization have a damaging im- :: .
act on it? Or would the entry. . . . . 4 .
of Peking, ending the exclusion" -.. ".' :;.,_.:;
of a regime claiming to repre-
sent 800 million people, in the
long run strengthen the United
Nations?
The cost of the American de-
feat is hard to calculate, even in
political terms. However, there is
a growing sentiment among
Washington officials and Con-
gressmen that the net result of Chou En-Lai
the defeat has been a dimunition
of American influence overseas.
The campaign to keep Taiwan in the U.N. outweighed any com-
parable diplomatic program undertaken by the United States in
recent memory. It involved a variety of devices, ranging from low-
level appeals to Presidential pleas to heads of state.
State department officials concede that in the 20-year lobbying
effort on behalf of Taiwan's seat, dozens of commitments both politi-
cal and economic have been made to enlist the support of various
nations.
"We've used every kind of currency," one official said, from
funds to build a new dam in one country to trade-off promises of
political support in another.
President Nixon suggested that anti-American manifestations
inthe assembly could undercut U.S. public and congressional confi-
dence in the United Nations. In Washington, in any case the set-
back stung painfully.
Immediately in advance of the Monday showdown, the U.S.
delegation had insisted it was going to be able to block expulsion
of Chiang Kai-Shek's Taiwan-based regime by making that issue
an importai, question, requiring a vote of two thirds of the members.
Somewhere along the line the Americans may have been tricked.
In the ordinary course of events the vote should have come
Tuesday. The Americans needed those extra hours to step up pressure
for their "IQ" resolution, as the delgates called the important-ques-
tion proposal.
Around dinner time Monday came a sudden drive to push for
a final vote that night. When the Americans couldn't stop it they
knew they were in trouble. Soon after, the "IQ" resolution also
failed, 59 to 55, with 15 abstaining.
The hall rang with triumphant cries of the sponsors. The Al-
banians, Peking's bellicose East European allies, clapped rhythmically,
Communist-style. Tanzanians, whose African nation gets Peking aid,
joined other enthusiasts in a victory dance. The demonstration was
limited mostly to "third world" nations, but there was no mistaking
the note of joyous anti-Americanism.
Only three of its 13 NATO allies voted with the United States.

LONDON ()A - Britain's La-
bor Party, one of the most pow-
erful Socialist movements in the
Western World, appeared yes-
terday in danger of exploding
in a violent burst of recrimina-
tion.
Sixty-nine of Labor's 289 mem-
bers of Parliament, led by Depu-
ty Leader Roy Jenkins, defied
official party policy and voted
with the ruling Conservatives
Thursday in favor of British
membership of the Common
Market. The motion was car-
ried with a 112-vote majority.
Many Laborites had seen the
vote as an unparalleled oppor-
tunity to defeat the government
and seize advantage of the Con-
servatives' current unpopularity
over high prices and unemploy-
ment to return to power in the
resulting general election.
Political observers were say-
ing yesterday that the bitter-
ness, anger and insults resulting
from the move have shocked
parliamentarians by their in-
tensity.
Judith Hart, a left-wing mem-
ber of Labor's national execu-
tive and a former government
minister, declared Friday night
that the party now faces the

greatest crisis in its history-
"unequalled even in 1931."
That was when Labor disin-
tegiated over Ramsey MacDon-
ald's decision to join the Tories
in a coalition government.
The most recent conflict cen-
tered on the scholarly Jenkins.
He is a nationally respected
figure; as chancellor of the ex-
chequer in the Labor govern-
ment which fell last year, he
accrued much of the credit for
transforming Britain's chronic
balance of payments' deficit in-
to a healthy surplus.
After his rebellion Thursday,
Jenkins extended an olive
branch to the left wing. He said
he would not support the gov-
ernment in votes over the com-
ing year to get through Parlia-
ment a mass of enabling legis-
lation to put Common Market
membership into effect, al-
though hedid not rule out the
possibility he might merely ab-
stain.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carr-er,-iAlt y mi...5

STARTS TODAY-3 DAYS ONLY!
2 BIG X HITS!
"'A Vibrantly
Blunt andi
Lifelike Eyeful.
Brazenly Sl
Boldly
Fatalistic
and:/
Often Hilarious
-Howard Thompson, N.Y. Times
PARAMOUNTPICTURES PRESENTSHENRY MILLER S
,eie U/Uwmicef
R IPTORN DAVID BAUER PHIL BROWN ELLEN BURSTYN JAMES CALLAHAN LAURENCE LIGNERES
eDaeced by J )OSEP H Ji suRIKSceenplay byJOSEPH STRICK and BETTY BOTLEY COLOR A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
ALSO-2ND BIG X HIT
PLAYBOY ran ten . : yced pages on this film!
"A sort of 'What's New Pussycat Y
brought up to today's level! "A zany
es a on, -erotobiography!
There are some scenes so explicit, so yet!"-PLYO
realistic, so natural that Mgzn
"IMAKES BLOW-UP' LOOKLIlKE
177LEMSS MARKER 7"
-LS ANGELES HERALD-EXAMNER
I4i-onp lus NERKN
cv r t, I c-Fom

THE ALLEY-330 Maynard
NOV. 5, 6, 7
MUDDY WATERS
$2.25-SHOWS AT 7:30-10:00
NOV. 11 (THUR.), 12, 13 (SAT.)C
Buddy Guy and Junior Wells
$2.25-SHOWS AT 7:30-10:00
Tickets on Sale at Salvation RecordsI
330 Maynard-1103 S. Univ.

American Revolutionary Media University of Michigan Film Society
present
The
MaleseFalcon
classic detective novel by Dashiell Hammett directed by John Huston
HUMPHREY BOGART
PETER LORRE SIDNEY GREENSTREET
MARY ASTOR
and Elisha Cook Jr., as Wilmer
Miss Wonderly, who Sam Spade thought was, "well, you know, wonderful,"
turns out to be "not so wonderful," but "good, very good."
She's just another contender, though, along with Joel Cario and the Fat Man
and his boy Wilmer, for "the bird," a black falcon whose enamel surface hides "a
vast fortune of diamonds, rubies and emeralds encrusted in gold, sent as tribute by
the Knights of Malta to the King of Spain."
Sam sends them all over, including Miss Wonderful. "Oh, it'll be bad at first, es-
pecially at night, but I'll get over it. And when your partner is killed, you're sup-
posed to do something about that. People might get the wrong idea. Any other way,
I'd never know." "Oh, Sam."'

Saern published uesday Well before the vote, Foreign Minister Chow Shu-kal had led his
through Saturday morning. Subscrip- Taiwan delegation in a dignified final exit from the General Assem-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail. bly hall.
SHOP MONDAY 9:30 A.M. UNTIL 5:30 P.M.

snuggle up in lounge-boots by Dearfoam
After skiing and at home, you'll be ankle-deep
t in warmth and brightness with a multicolor

I

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