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October 31, 1971 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-31

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 31, 1971

THE MKHIGAN DAILY Sunday, October 31, 1971

I

David Bromberg:
Eclectic, humorous

DENO VALANTE leads Quicksilver in their exploding style of superrock before a stoned, cheering
audience at Hill Auditorium last night. A review will appear in Tuesday's Daily.
A psychedelc Funkadeic trip

By ALAN NEFF
David Bromberg is appearing
at the Ark this weekend. As a
member of the audience this is
an entirely fine thing; for a re-
viewer he presents any number
of problems. My first impression
is of a scholarly, skinny New
York Jew, who looks like he
should be a quiet self-effacing
serious student in some obscure
program at Columbia. For all I
know he may actually have been
one but his stage presence, his
whole performing style is that
of an eclectic, rowdy, slightly
lunatic genius:.
He appears to be equally com-
fortable playing old television
commercials, Scotch and Irish
fiddle tunes, country and west-
ern, rhythm and blues, fifties
rock, his own self-mocking la-
ments (some funny, some other-
wise). His great range makes for
difficult reviewing. Musically
and lyrically he's all over the
place, a blur.
About the only way I can put
it is that he makes mistakes, but
at a level far above most con-
temporary performers. His gui-
tar picking is perhaps the best
thing, about his show. He per-
cusses, slides and bends notes all
over the neck. His roots seem to
be in the blues but he is not at
all limited to that one mode.
His voice has limitations,
mostly in terms of range. What
he lacks in range he recovers in
expressiveness. He moves very
fluently from a wispy balladic
tenor to rough-edged rhythm
and blues that is reminiscent of
John Hammond Jr. when he's in
control and being very mean.
Since 1966, he has been com-
piling an enviable set of cre-
dentials as a sideman (guitar,
mandolin, and dobro) for Dy-
lan, Tom Rush, Patrick Sky,
Paul Siebel, Carly Simon, Jerry
--- ---I

Jeff Walker, Sha - na - na and
others and others and others.
About a year ago, he began
appearing as a solo performer
on the great American coffee
house circuit (a vanishing en-
terprise). This is his third ap-
pearance at the Ark. I think
he's one of the finest performers
around.
He runs a pretty raucous show,
accompanied by bassist/2nd gui-
tarist Don Sarlin-a lot of very
funny things spring from his
* lips during and between songs.
I'm especially fond of the stuff
he writes. It's relatively easy to
talk about this aspect of his
work, because we have an eth-
nic, east coast heritage in com-
mon. I direct the listener's at-
tention to "Demon in Disguise, '
"Last Song to Shelby," "Jean,"
"This is the Hour," "Bullfrogs
on Your Mind." Taken together,
or even separately for that mat-!
ter, I get a picture of an artist
who's had some pretty depres-
sing experiences and emerged
bloody bitter and curiously un-
bowed, probably by dint of beat-
ing all sorts of nastiness into1
very fine music. This is no mean
triumph. Some of it sounds
pretty rough. Most of it is now .
really smooth.
The Visual Arts:
a Film Survey
SCULPTURE,
Tonight, 7 P.M.
R.C. Aud. FREEa

HALLOWEEN
FESTIVAL!
SUNDAY NIGHT
FREAKS
DIR. TOO BROWNING, 1932
The freaks of a circus
troupe in a film which
has b e e n recently re-

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leased in New York

to

renewed acclaim.
PLUS A SHORT!
Anything Once
HALLOWEEN NIGHT
The Haunting
Dir. ROBERT WISE, 1963
with Julie Harris, Claire
Bloom and Russ Tamblyn.
A haunted h ou se in-
triques a scientist who
decides to live there in
order to study it better.
That was his mistake. A
modern Halloween chiller
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

TO ALL STUDENTS
WHO PARTICIPATED IN
GRAD II
Computerized Job Opportunity
Matching Program
Your printout results are now available. Please pick them up at:
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3rd Floor-Student Activities Bldg.
764-7460 -
A second GRAD II computer run will be made in late December
or early January. Watch Daily Official Bulletin or check with
our office the week of'November 22 for deadline. date.

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4f BLUES
Jam Session
Filthy, Nasty, Down Home
Country Blues with
DAVE ALEXANDER
"We don't play no rock and roll"
SUN. 4:00p.m. 112 W. Liberty

By MADELYNE
Uninhibite d, psychedelically
colored, rhythmic, bluesy, funky,
just plain bad, which in soulful
lingo is the epitome of together.
The Funkadelics and Parliaments
did not perform Friday night at
Hill Auditorium, rather they en-
couraged us to join in their trip,
and we did.
A large crowd turned out to
dig the fifth of this year's UAC-
Daystar concerts, co-sponsored
with Community Projects and
Monroe Trotter House.
From the jump the audience
displayed their responsiveness. A,
local .group primed the spectac-
.tors even, more. The Black En-
semble came out to the screams
of some of the more excited
participants, and jammed. Vo-
calist Norbert Glover lead the
group backed by Larry Mander-
*ville dealing on the organ, Duane,
Freeman on drums, Doug Pitts,
*Zapp Mosson, and Rick Mander-
ville all strumming on guitars.
The people especially reacted to
Freeman's. solo on the Jackson
Five hit, "Never Can Say Good-
bye," and the group's cut sched-
uled for release the first of the
year, "Hold On To Me Girl ...
If You Don't Somebody Else
Will"
Although the audience grooved
to the sounds of the Black En-
sembl'e, folks were just biding
their time until the real stars
emerged. But the wait extended
s James Wesley Jackson from
Greenwood, Mississippi, pimped
onto the stage in studded denim
overalls. The farmish looking
comedian interspersed little phi-
losophical tidbits with a variety
of jokes. His commentary on so-
ciety included remarks as, "Mar-
ijuana would be no problem if
Congress would have a joint
session," and "Get off that meat
and get high off the Earth."
Much of his material revolved
around social hang-ups, sex,
dope, and black folks, and the
audience loved it all, including
Jackson's Jews Harp solo.
Finally the Funkadelics and
Parliaments c a m e on. Both
groups are one; the Funkadelics
is the band, and the Parliaments
sing. Lead guitarist Eddie Hozeil
strutted out, clad only in his
denim overalls and proceeded to
get down. A brother from To-
ronto, Prakash, supported on
bass, and Harold completed the
guitar trio. Meanwhile siuger-
drummer Fuzzy Haskin was
doin' it on drums.
Soon, head funkhead George

Clinton, marked with white race
paint, clad in long revealing pink
tie-dye underwear cutoffs, slid
onto the stage. My man, :iis head
shaved except for a tuft in the
back and an X of pair on the
side, protruded his eyes menanc-
ingly, and flicked out his tongue
faster than any snake ever wi~l.
Then the short stocky dude got
suggestive, rolling around on the
stage and playing with the mike
as the rest of the Parliaments
made their way to the stage.
Resembling a b 1 a c k Prince
Valiant, Calvin Simon came on
in a red, gold gilted tunic.
Brandishing a whip, G r a d y
Thomas hit the stage. In a pur-
ple leather outfit, B.T. 'moved
to the stage, as Raymond Davis
in beige bells joined. George
talked to us. "Try to figure out
where we are coming from and
where we are going, together."
And together we began moving
into a spiritual high.
The first song the group did
revealed an integral part of their
unhibited style, which some felks
find shocking. The group croon-
ed on "Call My Baby Pussycat."
Throughout the show, the group
also did some hip routines remi-
niscent of the old but good Temp-
tations. Then Calvin Simons
soloed on a melancholic lament,
"I Refuse to Be Blue from Los-
ing You." The brother hummed
and moaned until we could share
in his pain, while George squirm-
ed around on the stage, conduct-
ing. The audience, enticed into
the whole trip, sat spellbound.
By the time the group got into
their hits such as "Good Old
Funky Music;" the crowd moved
EXCLUSIVE
Q AREA SHOWING
"AN ALL-TIME FIRST

deeper into the high. An audi-
ence sing-along on "I Got a
Thing" helped things out when
the amps cut off. Things were
getting nice.
Other selections such as
"I Betcha" raised the high even
more, as a lot of folks moved to
the stage. Almost everybody
freaked out, joining the musi-
cians on stage. Those who knew
how to dance did the Penguin
and the Breakdown. Others just
moved their bodies, and the
band played on and on, to the
end.
Exhausted, the musicians did
talk a little about the "Right
On" audience. Most of the mem-
bers have been together for over
10 years, and hail from New
Jersey. And if you want to trip
at home, get the Funkadelics
latest album Maggot Brains.
Maybe you'll be able to reach
the undescribable euphoric high,
such as lots of folks experienced
at Hill Friday night, as the soul-
fully super-bad Funkadelics and
Parliaments took us on a deep
trip and into a beautiful night.

Saturday and Sunday

October 30-31

ROD STElGER as
The Pawnbroker
". . .has brilliantly intercut flashes of the
horrors of the concentration camp with
equally shocking visualizations of imprison-
ment in a free society."
-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times

7:00 and 9:05

75c

MAOR Theater presents, Nov. 6 & 7
The Newcomers
A DRAMA OF SURVIVORS OF THE
CONCENTRATION CAMP
by JOHN BERNSTEIN
Saturday and Sunday at Hillel-i1420 Hill-B P.M-$1

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at HILLEL

1429 Hill

only 50c

SAT. at 8 p.m,-SUNDAY at 9 p.m.

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DIAL 5-6290
4th WEEK
"I wouldn't say McCABE is more
enjoyable than M*A*S'H; it is
simply richer and better, a clas-
sic of its kind . . . be forewarn-
ed: the trick of appreciating
McCABE & MRS. MILLER is to
settle back and let it gurgle
over you.G
Neal Gaber-Michigan Daily

STS
i

SHOP FOR
THE

ly

6-
ro A

Unusual Games
* Large, Adult Game Selection
Exciting and Challenging
o Adult Unusual Jig Saw Puzzles
o Beautiful Stuffed Animals
0 Raliegh made Dunelts-
Men and Ladies-$59.95
THE FRIENDLY STUDENT STORE
CAMPUS BIKE & TOY
514 E. WILLIAM 662-0035

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{_
1
C

'Blue Movie'
Z Is honest, tittilating. '
It gives the audience
Z whet Ipaid to see.
C4 ****** -N.Y. Times
" THE
THIS Q RATED FILM IS
HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
BY THE MANAGEMENT
* Plus 2nd flature *
a t inema 482 -3300
PARKING6

"TheOwl and
the Pussycat
is a hootenanny and the cat's meow!
-Wanda Hale, New York Daily News
"Barbra Streisand is America's great-
est comedienne! -Hollis Alpert, Saturday Review
"The Owl and the Pussycat is
hilarious" --Ed Sullivan Syndicated Columnist
"One of the truly funny pictures of
the year!" -Gail Rock, Women's Wear Daily
"A wildly funny movie under Herbert
Ro' -directiOn!" -Phyllis Funke, Ingenue'
"A hoot of fun! Well-worth waiting for!"
-Joyce Haber, Syndicated Columnist
"Warm and wacky! A fine screenplay
by Buck Henry! -David Goldman, WCBS Radio
"Streisand and Segal give remarkable
performances. The upshot is hilarious!"
-Jack Kroll, Newsweek
"Clawing Comedy! THE OWL AND
THE PUSSYCAT is high entertain-
ment!" . vow -Mark Goodman, Time
"Ray Stark has a viable vehicle for
his super-star." -Judith Crist, New York Magazine

4

IA

WARREN
BEATTY
JULIE
CHRISTIE
McCABE &
MRS. MILLER
PANA'SION OTECIICOLOR
Next
"DANCE OF DEATH"

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the ann arbor film cooperative presents

BRIAN DE PALMA'S
("H I, MOM")

GREETINGS

PA

For the student body:
R~A
FLARES
by
A Levi
Farah
Wright
Lee
Male
CHECKMATE

I

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" "GREETINGS flaunts a genuinely youthful spirit, antisocial but not misanthropic, sassy but not ma-
licious, pessimistic but not morbid."-Andrew Sarris, The Village Voice
* "An outrageous satire, the main target of which is the Vietnam War, but which also makes fun of
sex, movies, computer dating, paperbacks, voyeurism, the Warren Report and its critics, and pornog-
raphy . . . Its occasional anarchy and chaos serve to underscore the violent, destructive society it
portrays."-Distributor's catalog.
TUESDAY-NOVEMBER 2nd-ONLY!

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SATURDAY & SUNDAY
Halloween Double Feature

auditorium a-angell hall

COLOR

7 & 9:30 p.m.-still only 75c

2 FILMS
AT 7

FOR 75c
& 10

COMING THURSDAY-FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT'S THE WILD CHILD
..t SOPH SHOW
tickets now on saleI
for
PAJM AME
i~i - 0 fD A

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The Phantom of the Opera
The original 1925 silent film starring Lon Chaney
and Mary Philbin. Accompanied at the piano by
Donald Sosin and an original score.

COLUMBIA PICTURES AND RASTAR PRODUCTIONS PRESENT
A RAY STARK -HERBERT ROSS Production
Barbra George
Streisand Segal
Th 1nthe q tca
Screenplay by Produced by Ur ected by
BUCK ENRY RAY STARK HEFo.:RT F.OSS
SaSed o one pay W 8'11 .MANKOFF
PANAVISION' COLOR _ U o n imb
_._ ,BIOO SWEA TE 1

A. . A.- 0 1 1 "1 i

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