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October 28, 1971 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-28

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Th u rsdoy, October 28, 1971

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, October 28, 1971

1N, FOC.S
Photography exhibits highlight week
----- - -by Richard Lee

''''

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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EDITOR'S NOTE: This question-
and-answer column, published each
Thursday by The Daily is written by
Richard Lee, a local free-lance pro-
fessional photographer. Lee is a mem-
ber of the National Press Photog-
raphers Association and his pictures
have appeared in national maga-
zines.
Questions may be mailed to Rich-
ard Lee. c/o The Michigan Daily, 420
Maynard St.
Q. How can I get a really
sharp photo?-Uriah C.
A. Photography is interesting
because it involves many vari-
ables. So this answer will try
to point out the most common
errors.
It'll be assumed you're using
a half-way decent lens, not one
made out of a coke bottle bot-
tom, or plastic.
The most probable cause of
blurred photos is focusing er-
ror. Some people focus on the
subject, then the subject either
moves or the photographer
moves for better composition,
and click. All without refocus-
ing. Sure the image still looked
pretty good in the viewfinder,
but when it is enlarged to 8x10,
the focussing error is now mag-
nified at least eight times.
Then there are those photog-
raphers that trip their shutter
with the force of a sledge ham-
mer, causing a tremor just short
of earth, shaking magnitude.
Shutters should be gently de-
pressed.
The technique to use to take
up the slack in the shutter but-
ton, then at the moment that
exposure is desired, the trip dis-
tance is only one or two milli-
meters, requiring no more more
further pressure than the mere
exercise of a finger muscle.
Okay, so now you've got a
$500 lens, 20-20 vision, finger
muscles of a piano player. Still
blurred images.
Might be the shutter speed is
too slow. So what's the use of a
gentle finger tripping action if
you're shaking the camera up
and down and swaying your
body with the wind?
Holding a camera rock steady
so that shutter speeds of a 30th
or even 15th of a second could
be used with the camera hand
held comes from experience and
an awareness of your own limi-
tations. Nobody is rock steady,
unless he's in the final stages
of rigor mortis.
Most photographers try not to
use shutter speeds less than the
focal length of the lens they're

using. For example, if you're us-
ing a 50mm lens, your longest
hand held shutter speed should
be a 50th or 60th of a sec-
ond. Corresponding speed for a
longer 135 mm lens is 125th of a
second, and so on. This is be-
cause the longer the focal length
of the lens, the greater camera
shakes will be magnified.
So now you've avoided all the
above problems, and your pic-
tures are too sharp, because it's
cluttered up with too many ob-
jects in focus because you're also
stopping down to f-16 to get a
greater depth of field to com-
pensate for any focusing error.
There's your new error. Stop-
ping down too much. Also prac-
tically all lenses perform at
their best at two or three stops
past maximum aperature. Or
mid-point in the f-stop range
of your lens, depending on how
good it is.
Professional photographers
have long discovered that by
throwing the background out
of focus, the subject stands out
more distinctly, thereby giving
an impression of accurate fo-
cusing, even if the lens isn't ex-
actly sharp or focused properly.
Remember 'too that opening
the lens up and shooting at
wider apertures means utilizing
higher shutter speeds. Almost
akin to doubly blessed!
* * * .
Q. The flash on my Instama-
tic works erratically. Why?-
Patti X.
A. That's the main grumble
among Instamatic users and
one of the reasons why Kodak
came out with their second gen-
eration Instamatic cameras,
known as Instamatic-X.
These new cameras use the
same easy to load film cart-
ridges, but the flash is different.
Instead of requiring an electric
impulse supplied by batteries in
the' camera to trigger the old
flash cube and regular flash
bulbs, the new cube flash, apart
from being bigger and more
powerful is set off by a mechan-
ical plunger. No more battery.
problems.
That's of little comfort to
those that own the old line of
Instamatic type cameras. So
there's nothing to do but see
that the batteries are fresh, the
contacts are clean, and the flash
cube hasn't already been fired.
To clean electrical contacts in
the battery compartment or on

the flash cube, rub at it with
an eraser.
* * *
Q, In my film developing,
must the temperature of the
chemicals be at exactly 68 de-
grees F? -- John K.
A. No. Use the time and tem-
perature chart that comes with
each roll of film.
As chemicals get warmer, it
reacts faster, so all you have
to do is compensate for this in-
creased activity by decreasing
time.
However, as a rule, developing
times of shorter than 2 min-
utes should be avoided. Also de-
velopers should be no warmer
than 78 degrees F.
Unless you're trying to get
emulsion reticulation, all chem-
icals should be kept within two
or three degrees of each other.
Reticulation is caused by the
rapid expansion and shrinkage
of the film emulsion as it plung-
ed from .one chemical to an-
other when temperatures differs
too greatly.
The resultant print is much
like an old painting, with the
paint dry and cracked.

Emeritus of Eastman House,
Rochester, N.Y.
The other half of the photog-
raphy display is classified as the
"Photographs for Purchase
Consideration."
This is a once in a lifetime
chance to see some really beau-
tiful photographs, all in one
place, by some of the most out-
standing photographers of the
past and present.
The purpose of this particular
display is for patrons of the arts
to purchase these original
prints and donate them to the
Museum of Art to start a per-
manent collection of photog-
raphy.
Original prints by photog-
raphers like Edward Weston,
Frederick H. Exans, Man Ray,
Edward Steichen, Henri Cartier
Bresson, Paul Caponigro, W.
Sugene Smith, Ansel Adams,
Imogene Cunningham and many
raphers are on displyetaoiinhrrdl
many more superb photograph-
ers are on display.

There's Edward Weston's fa-
mous photo of two shells. Also
his "Pepper". All students of
photography have probably seen
reproductions of his famous
works in magazines. But even
with gravure copy repro, they
is no way to approach the full
tonal quality of his original
prints. Don't miss these.
Then there's W. Eugene
Smith's "Grandma Moses", a
simply beautiful photo and
print.
Look out for Frederick H.
Evans' "Well's Cathedral".
This one's a platinum print. To
really appreciate it, you'd need
a magnifying glass. Oh, is isn't
small, it's just that the lines
are so fine and evvery single
detail is there, that looking at
it from a distance of 10 inches
doesn't do the print justice.
Don't miss this collection of
really outstanding photos, if
you do you're no photographer,
just another weekend snap-
shooter!

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPnWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28
Day Calendar
History Majors Organization Meeting:
To organize programs for this yr. and
elect undergrad reps on Dept. of Hist.
Currie. Comm. and Steering Comm;
majors invited to bring bag lunch (cof-
fee will be served) and meet in 3609
Haven Hall. Noon.

Library Science Lecture: D. Fader,
author of Hooked on Books and The . .::":: :c;;z:: :#:. ::"::::>:."."."."..N
Naked Children, UGLI Multipurpose
Rm, 1:30 pm. ORGANIZATION
Computing Ctr. Short Course: W.
Gerstenberger, "Advanced Use of Mag-
netic Tapes in MTS," 2084 E. Engin.,.O I E
3 pin.
Mental Health Research Inst.: W.
Uttal, "Brains Are for Seeing," 1057
MHRI, 3:45 pm. International Law Society, Oct. 28.
Resonance Seminar: W. Sommer, 6:30 PM, Lawyers Club Lounge. Panel
WSU, "The Mobility of Electrons on discussion on "Legal and Political
the Surface of Liquid Helium-A Con- Mentions of the Pakistan Conflict."
troversy," 2045 Randall Lab, 4 pm. Participants are: Nur Malik, president
International Night: Australian food, of Pakistan Students Association, for
Mich. League Cafeteria, 5-7:15 pm. West Pakistan and Muvammel Huq,
Music School: Contemporary Festival, president of Bengela Desh, for East
Rackham Aud., 8 pm. Pakistan. Moderated by Daoud Khairal-
International Coffee Hour: Rive lah, post graduate law student from
Gauche. 1024 Hill St., 9-11 pm. Lebanon.
10-7 MON.-THURS.
10-9 FRI., SAT.
I ~The Wine. ht'ppe.
347 Maynard St.
PURVEYOR OF THE WORLD'S FINEST WINES

4

There are
exhibitions
shown at the

two photography
currently being
Museum of Art.

Join The Daily
CIRCULATION DEPT.
Come in any afternoon
420 Maynard

The main display is by Walk-
er Evans, a photographer known
for his signs and symbols of
the concerned environment, the
monuments of an anonymous
architecture and the industrial
landscape. Most of his photos
are of the 30's era.
A major part of his photo-
graphs rely on lines and shapes
to form patterns. His sense of
composition is beautiful.
This column will not attempt
to review his work as photog-
raphy is a matter of taste.
Some will see beauty in his
style, others will 'shrug and
figure they can do the same
kind of picture. But always re-
member, yours will be a copy of
his style. Anyhow, do go over-
there. It's that impressive look-
ing building opposite the Union.
Hours are from 9 to 5 Mon-
day through Saturday, except
9 to 9 on Wednesdays, and 2 to
5 on Sundays. The exhibition is
open from now till December 5.
Tomorrow, from 2 to 5 p.m.
there will be a symposium. The
speakers will be Walker Evans
and Beaumont Newhall, Director

N
r
N

I

Keep America Clean.
Keep America Beautiful.

TONIGHT
AT 7 and 9

1

DIAL 8-6416
HELD OVER!

4 ,5f;.
ay .
i " '

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Advertising contributed
for the public good.

I

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DIAL 5-6290
4th WEEK
"I wouldn't say McCABE is more
enjoyable than M*A*S*H; it is
simply richer and better, a clas-
sic of its kind . . . be forewarn-
ed: the trick of appreciating
McCABE & MRS. MILLER is to
settle back and let it gurgle
over you.
Neal Gabler-Michigan Daily

Star syndrome: Pecking idols

Saturday and Sunday October 30-31
ROD STEIGER as
The Pawnbroker
". .. has brilliantly intercut flashes of the
horrors of the concentration camp with
equally shocking visualizations of imprison-

Dear Daily readers,
Last weekend I had the dubi-
ous distinction ofhheading the
production staff of the Joan
Baez concert. Until then I never
realized how firmly entrenched
so many people are in the "star
syndrome." It's sad when people
start regarding musicians and
political figures as stars, as
idols, who may as well be carved
out of marble. But it is even
more insufferable when these
prominent figures start to re-
gard themselves as stars.
I'm sorry that those of you
who' wanted to meet Joan Baez
were unable to, but there are
certain stars and a hierarchy
of head honchos who see to it
that an audience is kept in its
place. If I could have had my
way, she would have seen and
talked to whoever wanted to
meet her. I even tried sneaking
a few people by the Sanford Se-
curity guards, but they were
"only doing their jobs," and we
weren't allowed into the, realm
of the select.
Damn it-we are the people
who are paying the stars. We
are buying their records and we
are buying tickets to their con-
certs. We are theones who cre-
ated the images they wallow in.
And we can't even meet them or
see them off the concert stage.
Maybe that's why so many song
writer-singers can only find it
in themselves to write about
their own alienation, and then
drag theirbaudiences along into
their own bad trips.
I was so infuriated by the
treatment of a number of people
last Saturday night, that I want-
ed to rid myself of all connec-
tions with the concert. I saw
people getting pushed around
The Place to Meet
INTERESTING People!
BACH CLUB
Presents
BRASS QUINTET
playing
BACH, PURCELL, MOZART
.-. - ^ . r-,-.n v

4'

and stepped on by a p e r s o n
whom some of them had come to
love and admire, and by a hier-
archy that is nearly impossible
to buck. In the process, I con-
jured up a fantasy which, of
course, will never materialize. It
took the form of an advertise-
ment reading "The Folklore So-
ciety received 35 per cent of the
profits, and anyone with a ticket
stub can come back to us and
receive a 35 percent rebate on
the price of his ticket. We are
hereby absolved of all compli-
ance with and responsibility for
perpetuating a system as deca-
dent and inhuman as the star
system." But these are matters
which the Folklore Society will
collectively decide upon, and I
will be left to my fantasies.
When I stalked out of the
concert shortly after the inter-
mission, I was furious. I was
furious because of the pompous-
ness of one Joan Baez. I was
furious because she "had to save
her energy for the second set"
and couldn't take a minute to
meet one disenchanted fan. And
I was furious because an un-
claimed lost wallet was not "im-
The
WOMEN'S CRISIS
CEN TER
needs Women to be
Counselors
and
Street Patrols
CALL 662-5400
for information

portant" enough to mention a
secondetime inorder to save
someone a hassle. I was told,
"He'll look in his pocket, find
his wallet gone, and then he'll
come running for it." That's the
kind, of mentality so many of
you have obviously come to adu-
late and adore, or else reviews
like the one that appeared in
The Daily on Sunday (Oct. 17)
would never have been written.
Nancy Katz
Folklore Society President
Amanda Bailey
Judy Mason
Lorre Weidlich
-*-0
- ANALL:,TIME FIRST
*live Movie'
Z is honest, tittlating.
81 it gives the audene 'K
Z what t paid to see.
04 ******-N.Y.Times
* '
THISQRATED FILM IS
HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
BY THE MANAGEMENT
* Plus 2nd feature *
cinema842*3300
PAR Ig

ment in a free society."
at HILLEL 1429

-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times
Hill only 50c

I

SAT. at 8 p.m.-SUNDAY at 9 p.m.

WARREN
BEATTY
JULIE
CHRIS TIE
McCABE &
MRS. MILLER
PANAVISION OTECHNICOLOR @
Next
"DANCE OF DEATH"

THE ALLEY CINEMA
PRESENTS
TONIGHT ONLY-THURSDAY, OCT. 28
The Horror Cham be r
of Dr. Faustus
dir. GEORGES FRANJU, 1962
This Frenchrspine-chiller by the New Wave director Franju is in
the best Grand Guignot tradition, as it weaves menacingly and
murderously around a mad plastic surgeon and the weird facial
experiments he conducts on unwilling patients in on- effort to
restore beauty to his beloved daughter's mutilated features. With
Alida Valli.
"a ghastly elegance that suggests Tennessee Williams!"
-London Observer
SHOWS AT 7 & 9:30 $1.00
330 Maynard
COMING MON.-REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE
sponsored by ann arbor film cooperative

f

I

} University of Michigan School of Music
presents
1971 Contemporary
Music Festival
American music
October 28, Rackham Lecture Hall,8:00

MASS MEETING

STRAVINSKY: Epitapi
CRUMB: Sonata
BURT: Four Studies
RUGGLES: Angels

UM Ensemble

Jerome Jelinek, cello
UM Percussion Ensemble
UM Brass Ensemble

UAC TRAVEL
763-2147
Thursday, Oct. 28
8 P.M.-UNION BALLROOM

London-Amsterdam-Munich-Nossau-Acapulco--Youth Fares

JOHNSTON: Ivesberg Revisited
flAhfllTTFAll C.

i '
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D a

You Are Invited to

FREE WORKSHOP on
"NEW ART FORMS

lll

DMUM 11: All Set!
BROWN: Dahoud
UM Jazz Band
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
Advertising contributed by Chi Chapter, Pi Kappa Lambda
READ
[ A A A tr U En t * *a I

!!I

Iowa Scottish Highlanders*
Michigan Men's Glee Club**

FOR WORSHIP"
Conducted by Artist REINHOLD MARXHAUSEN

JOINT CONCERT

II

3I

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Oftba WI o_ P%&o%

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