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October 17, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


The Actors Guild
regrets to announce
The Killing of Sister George
the controversial play

41--vp

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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£iet~iitan

:43 a ftly

page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Sunday, October 17, 1971

~,x

that murdered
censorship in England
The Bereaved May View the Deceased on:
FRIDAY, OCT. 15-7 and 10 P.M.
SATURDAY, OCT. 16-7 and 10 P.M.
SUNDAY, OCT. 17-Matinee 2 P.M.
Evening 7:30 P.M.
Residential College Auditorium
TICKETS $1.25 available only at the door

ne ws briefs
By The Associated Press
KATHLEEN CLEAVER, wife of Black Panther leader Eld-
ridge Cleaver, arrived in New York yesterday from Algiers to
prepare for a nationwide speaking tour in support of what she
called the urban guerilla struggle.

Indian, Pakistani
forces group as
war seems near
NEW DELHI (A) - India and Pakistan massed troops
yesterday along their tense borders, teetering on the brink of
a military confrontation that the major powers have sought
I for seven months to avoid.
An Indian Defense Ministry spokesman said India was
moving its Armed forces up to the borders with both East
and West Pakistan as a "precautionary defensive measure"
following a similar buildup during the week by Pakistan.
Western diplomatic sources said they were aware of
the deployment of troops on both sides and expressed con-

-J

I

"INCREDIBLE!"

-Michigan Daily

'THE DEVILS' is an allegory for
our time. Reed creates a character
of tremendous stature and dignity,
one of the few convincingly heroic
figures in recent movies . .. it is
filled with the energy, passion and
imagination that make Ken Russell
one of the most exciting and im-

portant filmmakers
day."

working

to-

-Stel/hen Farber-, inl the A'.Terv: Yori. Tivies

She reported that Eldridge Cleaver .would follow her "very
soon." "My husband and I will speak to revolutionary forces," she
said. "There is a need for many new fighters."
* *
PRESIDENT ANWAR SADAT of Egypt said yesterday he has
turned down a formal American request for "a longer period"
to discuss U.S. proposals for a Middle East settlement, informed
sources reported.
Sadat said the request for more time was connected to the
six-point plan for a peaceful settlement proposed by Secretary of
State William Rogers, the sources reported. They quoted Sadat as
saying he does not favor "continuing this long dialogue: with the
Americans which will lead us in a vicious circle."
* * *
AMERICAN B52 BOMBERS mounted the heaviest raids to
date along the Cambodian border yesterday in an effort to halt
the three-week old North Vietnamese frontier offensive.
The U.S. Command reported that five waves of the bombers
struck on the South Vietnamese side of the border and an undisclosed1
number pounded the eastern edge of Cambodia. Elsewhere in Indo-
china fighting was generally light.
SEN. WILLIAM PROXMIRE (D-Wisc) urged Congress yes-
terday to grant President Nixon the almost limitless economic
powers he is asking but to restrict them to six months rather
than a year and a half.
Proxmire, chairman of the congressional Joint Economic Com-
mittee said private talks with members of the House and Senate have
encouraged him that he can wineffective support for this com-
promise.
PRIME MINISTER EDWARD HEATH of Britain warned
yesterday that the United States is on the point of transforming
its defense and economic relations with Europe and he called
on the nations of Western Europe to unite for their own protec-
tion.
Heath, winding up the annual convention of the Conservativej
Party, foresaw the Nixon Administration "working toward direct
arrangements" with Russia and the People's Republic of China and
"acting drastically" to defend the eroded U.S. economy.

VANESSA REDGRAVE
OLIVER REED
KEN RUSSELL'S FILM
THE DEVILS
SUNDAY 3 05 57 0
MON. & TUES. 7 & 9
STARTS WED.
"MARAT SADE" &
"BELLE DE JOUR"

-Associated Press
A nt-inflation boards
Donald Rumsfeld, presidential adviser and director of the Cost of
Living Council, explains to newsmen the Pay Board and Price
Commission, a newly created device in the administration's eco-
nomic stabilization program.
UNDER CONSIDERATION:
U.S. ma lift import
barriers, selectively
HOT SPRINGS, Va. (A")-Secretary of the Treasury John Con-
nally raised the possibility yesterday that the United States will con-
sider a selective lifting of its 10 per cent import surcharge. This
might be done for countries which meet U.S. requests for upward
revaluation of their currencies and the removal of trade barriers, he
indicated.
Connally, addressing 110 top industrialists at the fall meeting of
the Business Council, told reporters the United States is willing to
wait as long as proves necessary to negotiate a satisfactory worldwide
realignment of currency values.

9

FITH FOruM
Ij~FIFTH AVENUE AT LIBERTY!
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
INORMATION 761-9700

UAC-DAYSTAR
HOMECOMING 1971
"Let's Work Together"

cern that war could break out
at any time.
They said Pakistan evidently
had started the buildup first, send-
ing an armored division into the
border region.
A highly placed diplomatic
source said that a senior member
of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi's
Cabinet had told an ambassa-
dor Friday night that "war is in-
evitable" and possibly could break
out in two weeks..
Gandhi met for the second
straight day with her senior Cabi-
net colleagues to review the bor-
der situation. She was expected
to outline India's latest stand at a
news conference Tuesday - five
days before her scheduled depar-
ture on a three-week, six-nation,
trip.
Foreign Secretary T. N. Kaul
told The Associated Press: "We
won't fire the first shot, but we
will defend our territorial integ-
rity if attacked."
Most informed observers be-
lieved, however, that war could
easily start with each side blam-
ing the other for firing the initial
shot.
Indian and Pakistani troops fre-
quently have exchanged fire dur-
ing the past six months, but these
incidents were confined to the
border along East Pakistan,
where President Yahya Kahn's
army has been trying to crush a
provincial independence move-
ment.
Yahya has warned that he
would go to war with India, which
he has accused of supporting the
E a s t Pakistani independence
fighters, if there was any dan-
ger of Pakistan losing territory in
its eastern province.
The threat of a military con-
frontation has increased in the
past week as chances of a political
settlement have receded.
India's position has hardened as
it has had to care for millions of
East Pakistani refugees, whom the
government says now number
more than 9 million.
Gandhi insists that they all
must return to East Pakistan.

AID FOR CAMBODIA
Mansfield blasts foreign advisors

Thursday, Oct. 28
PINK FLOYD
GUARDIAN ANGEL'
$1 .50-$2.50-$3.50

Friday, Oct. 29
Parliament-Funkadelic
BLACK ENSEMBLE
$1 -$2-$3

WASHINGTON 0P) - Senate
Democratic Leader Mike Mans-
field said yesterday that a plan
by U.S. officials in Cambodia
to hire foreigners as military
advisers appears to be "an end
run around the intent of Con-
gress and the wishes of the
American people."
He said the American officials
in Phnom Penh who outlined
the plans for hiring the advisers
stressed "they are people who
can do under contract what we
are forbidden to do."
Mansfield, talking to report-
ers, noted that last year Con-
gress barred U.S. military ad-

visers, training personnel and
combat ground forces from
Cambodia.
He said he will reopen the
Cambodian aid matter this week
before the Senate Foreign Rela-
tions Committee completes ac-
tion on a foreign aid bill that
includes $250 million in U.S. as-
sistance for Cambodia.
The committee voted last
week to .limit U.S. involvement
in Cambodia to $250 million
and 200 personnel, including 50
of the foreigners called "third-
country nationals."
Sens. Stuart Symington (D-
Mo.) and Clifford Case (R-N.J.)

argued for the need to put some
rein on the expanding American
presence in Cambodia before it
gets out of hand.
The committee chairman,
Sen. J. William Fulbright (D-
Ark.) contended that placing
limits would have the counter-
effect of authorizing actions
previously taken illegally.
The committee is scheduled to
meet again Tuesday or Wednes-
day after the House vote on the
Senate-passed amendment call-
ing for total U.S. withdrawal
from Indochina in six months if
American prisoners are freed.

However, the secretary promised
-in apparent response to foreign
complaints that the United States
has been vague in its demands
and shows no urgency about re-
moving the surcharge - that
American negotiators will be
ready to present some specifics
at the meeting in Paris Monday
of the deputy finance ministers of
the so-called Group of Ten rich-
est industrial nations.
Earlier some officials had ex-
pressed hope that the deputies
could work out recommendations
acceptable to the Group of Ten
powers, whose finance ministers
will meet in mid-November.
Connally said he expects pro-
gress at the Paris session but does
not now expect a settlement by
mid-November of the American
push for an upward revaluation of
other currencies to restore the
competitiveness of U.S. goods in
world markets.

Violene
flares in
SIreland
BELFAST, Northern Ireland (R)
- A British soldier was shot dead
and another seriously wounded
yesterday in guerrilla attacks in
Northern Ireland's two biggest ci-
ties.
The soldier who died was cut
downby a bullet during a skirmish
between security forces and stone-
throwing rioters on the fringe of
Londonderry's Bogside, a hub of
Roman Catholic unrest.
He was the 123rd fatality in the
civil strife that has gripped this
British province for the past two
years.
In Belfast, Northern Ireland's
capital, guerrillas shot another
British soldier and a local police
inspector in separate ambushes.
A small boy was injured by a
bomb blast in still another inci-
dent.
The violence in Londonderry
erupted as rioters began stoning
police and troops in the city cen-
ter. British soldiers fired rubber
bullets and used nausea gas to
drive the mob back into Bogside.
Then snipers opened up on the
troops in William Street, on the
edge of the Catholic district, and
one soldier fell dead. Earlier, an
army patrol in Belfast's Old Park
Road, another Catholic quarter,
came under similar sniper fire.
One soldier was badly wounded
A gunman fired three shots
point-blank at Detective Inspector
Leo McBrien as he sat in his car
waiting for a traffic light to
change. McBrien staggered to a
nearby hospital where he under-
went an operation for the removal
of a bullet from his head. The
hospital said he would survive.
Police blamed all the attacks
on outlaws of the Irish Republi-
can Army, waging guerrilla war-
fare to unite Protestant-dominat-
ed Northern Ireland with the in-
dependent republic in the south.
All bus services in the capital
were closed down at 6 p.m. after
gunmen hijacked and burned four
buses during the day.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class pastage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

Saturday, Oct. 30
QUICKSILVER
CATFISH
$2-$3.50-$4-$4.50

__

I

1

F,

BORN FREE
with VIRGINIA McKENNA and BILL TRAVERS

IN COLOR

TON IGHT

HILL AUDITORIUM
ALL SHOWS START 9 P.M.
-TICKETS GO ON SALE MONDAY, OCT. 18-
MICHIGAN UNION 10 A.M.-6 P.M.

TIMES: 7-9-11 P.M. contribution $I.0J
BENEFIT FOR POLIS
KLEIN LOUNGE-Alice Lloyd Hall

0

i

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATER
and
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS
present

A

SHAW

I

MINIM FESTIVAL
OCTOBER 20--23

SATURDAY AND SUNDAY
CHANGE OF
SCHEDULE:
DUCK
SOUP
DIR. LEO McCAREY, 1932
WITH
The MARX BROTHERS
Groucho as the Prime
Minister of FREDONIA
holds up a document and
says to his assembled
council, "Why, it's so sim-
ple a child of 10 could
- . --- + a :. I .L.4

I

U

CIVIC:

MISALLIANCE.
opens Civic's

PLAYERS:
CAESAR AND
CLEOPATRA

i

I

(I

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