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October 17, 1971 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-17

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 17, 197

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, October 17, 197

Marceau:

Crea tor of

the art of pantomime

By JENNIFER COLE
Never having seen Marceau
and coming from modern dance,
I was prepared to accept literal-
ism' of representation which is
frowned upon in the dance. But
there was a hint of stereotype
in gesture, or interpretation;
clarity and nuance were happily
married throughout. The first
half of the evening included
six selections from his reper-
toire of style pantomimes; the
latter five 'pantomimes in the
persona Bip, Marceau's legend-
ary clown.
An interlude between the
charming title presentation by
Pierre Verry gave me the chance
to ask myself what the ex-
pected interpretation might be.
Never did he present the ob-
vious or graphic; irony and in-
nuendo of spirit and gesture
surprised one continually. He
might use the entire torso, a
study in form and tension, or
isolate a brow with equal facili-
ty. By a subtle shift in pos-
ture or weight the mood pro-
jected would alter and revert.
Some of th'e studies involved
rapid-fire transitions from one
character to its antithesis; often
being accomplished by a twirl
and re-emergence. Equally en-
chanting were those pieces in.
which a quality would melt and
another take form only to dis-
solve into its ironic counterpart.
Often, especially in "Creation of
the World," animals and spirits
would emerge from his gestures,
seeming to surprise him as us,
as though he were a medium
possessed, in which forces could
embody themselves then disap-
pear. Perhaps it was his appar-
ent egolessness at which I mar-
veled most, that Marcel the

man doesn't resist becoming
and unbecoming.
In terms of composition the
pieces were generally excellent.
Never did one affect long domi-
nate a scene without undergo-
ing a shift in quality or inten-
sity. Silence, and repetition of
movement were masterfully
used, giving breadth, rhythm'
and coherence to the work.
Comic interludes lightened all
the pieces except, and rightly,
"The Cage." Music or sound ef-
fects were judiciously used; I
liked most the tapping foot that
created rhythm and dynamics,
voicing excitement and its ebb-
ing, as in "The Sculptor."
"The Mask Maker" was prob-
ably the most powerful if alle-
gorically interpreted. We gasped
at the rapidity of his schizo-
phrenic alterations of affect as
masks were donned and doffed.
That his grinning mask stuck,
the body wrestling desperately
to tear off a smile, was eerie in-
deed! Make your own role-
analogy .. .
The delicate hand movements
in "Creation of the World" re-.
minded one of Eastern dance
forms, as did the weightless,
flowing energy quality. He
seemed innocent of intent
throughout as beings succes-
sively arose and dissolved.
"The Cage," another possibly
metaphorical piece, was uni-
fied in its spatial and qualita-
tive evocation of helplessness
and isolation.
In "The Trial" we saw Mar-
ceau deftly juggling several dis-
tinct personalities, especially the
antithetical lawyers, one stag-
gering with bravado, the other
imploring of pity. By postural
differences he effected an al-

most Strangelovian scene of
battling opposites.
Bip appeared as fireman,
skater, soldier, at a society par-
ty, and as David and Goliath.
Dreamlike sound effects, espe-
cially the Doppler effect seemed
congruous with the flow and
ebb of mood within Marceau
himself. His (fantasied?) heroic
rescue of the child, accom-
panied by a suggestion of La
Marseille, was counterpointed by
a comic cigarette-break.
A light piece, "The Skater"
included some almost balletic
technical virtuosity.
"The Soldier" was romantic-
ally poignant, humanly funny
(for all of us who have ever
reached the end of a long row
of buttons, only to be one off!)
The death of his comrade and
finally his own, were blue-lit,
quieting.
Our common heritage of so-
cial affectations and blunders
provided rich material for "The
Society Party." My response to
his drunken vertigo was almost
physical.
A narrow black screen provid-
ed a hiding place for the alter-
ego in David and Goliath.
There seemed a good three
feet of disparity in height as
the two chased around, disap-
pearing and re-emerging; Go-
liath with the ape-arms of a
line-backer, David cowering un-
til his fatal shot. This being the
final piece, they bowed alter-
nately, with Goliath finally sig-
nalling David to come out from
behind the screen and join him.
And I honestly half-expected
that the two could appear sim-
ultaneously; after an evening
with the master-magician Mar-
ceau!

Organ series
opens tonight
Internationally known orga-
nist and composer Maurice Du-
rufle and his wife, renowned or-
gan virtuoso Marie-Madelaine
Durufle-Chevalier, will give lec-
ture demonstrations at the
Eleventh Annual Conference on
Organ Music, sponsored by the
School of Music and the Exten-
sion Service.
The conference begins to-
night at 8:30 p.m. in Hill Audi-
torium with a recital by Gary
Ericksen, University doctoral
student, playing Messiaen and
Liszt. Tomorrow and Tuesday
a number of lectures and re-
citals by University faculty
members and grad students will
take place. These will include
premiere performances and the
complete organ music of Duru-
fle. Further details and times
are listed in the Daily Official
Bulletin.

Warner Bros. present
LAZARUS
produced by P. Yarrow (of Peter, Paul and .Mary)
appearing with: Poco, Peter Yarrow, Paul Stookey,
J. Denver, John Conyers and Eugene McCarthy
at U. of D., Monday, Oct. 18-8 p.m.
anti drug-abuse benefit 50c admission

I

4-mgm,

DIAL 8-6416
TODAY at
1-3-5-7-9 P.M

wwmmmlmmw

DIAL 5-6290
o)

Expressive silence

'Cahoots': Better awaited

By AL SHACKELFORD
Cahoots (Capitol SMAS 651)
should have been a smash. After
all, the Band has as much col-
lective talent as anyone else,
and hasn't the disappointing
quality of recent big-name re-
leases paved the way for a sup-
er-successive album? A new
Band album should have been
a sure pick-me-up.
Unfortunately, Cahoots is as
uneven as its predecessor Stage
Fright, and probably more mud-
dled. Robbie Robertson, the
master songwriter, has fathered
a collection of new tunes that
fail to come alive in the tradi-
tion of "The Weight" or "King
Harvest (Has Surely Come) ."
Although still as old-fashioned
as ever, the songs reflect an un-
certainty on the part of Rob-
ertson, an inability to progress
in any musically-valid direction.
The Band, once so vital and
rich, has become stagnant, to
bide its time until inspiration
strikes.
Songs like "Where Do We Go
from Here?" and "Smoke Sig-
nal" are indicative of an in-
creasing trend in the Band's
music toward expressing disen-
chantment and dismay over the
low quality of American life.
Robertson laments the disap-
pearance of the buffalo and the
railroad but fails to say any-
thing that we all haven't heard
before. Even messiah-candidate

Bob Dylan, represented by one
song in this collection, refuses
to chuck the slightest tidbit of
wisdom down to us.
I wouldn't mind this lack of
lyric originality if the music
was top-flight Band, but it
isn't. The first cut, "Life is a
Carnival," starts the album off
See THE BAND, Page 10

HELLSTROM CHRONICLEI
CH#IRLTON
HESTON TH
Q)MEGIkMAN
DIAL 662-6264 _
COLOR GP

1
A
N
C
0
A

FRANCONIA COLLEGE
Franconia, N.H. 03580
Become the
architect of
your own
education.
Conceive it,
describe it,
construct it,
and. then
achieve it.

WARREN
BEATTY
JULIE
CHRISTIE
M cCABE &
MRS. MILLER
PANAVISION CaTECHNICOLOR@
From Warner Bros. A Kinney Services Company
Next
"DANCE OF DEATH"

h

0p

TODAY ONLY

Franconia is seeking quali-
fied students for Spring
(Feb. 15) and Fall 1972 ad-
mission. Students who are
ready to play an active role
in planning their education
are invited to apply. For ap-
plication, catalog or inter-
view appointment contact
Admissions. Box AA.

'Poco enthusiastico'

Poco gets 'em dancing at EMU

UNIVERSITY

By AL SHACKELFORD
Rusty Young, looking p a 1 e
and exhausted, sat hunched in
the corner of Poco's lockerroom-
turned dressing room. He could
look forward to South Bend,
then Cincinnati, then a drug
abuse benefit at the University
of Detroit Monday night.
"I usually take a few more
solos than I did tonight," said
puss. "But I really was tired."
Thus most of the solo playing
during Poco's Friday night con-
cert at Eastern Michigan Uni-
versity was left to lead guitarist
Paul Cotton, whosreplaced Jim
Messina about seven months
ago.
The homecoming crowd did-
n't mind that Rusty wasn't get-
ting off on his incredible solo
work, or even that Poco left the
exciting Y o u n g - dominated
"Grand Junction" off the show.
They ate up the rock that Poco
dished out and were out of
their seats dancing throughout
most of the hour-long set. Poco
does have that effect on peo-
ple.
Over its three-year existence
Poco had gradually succumbed
to commercial pressures a n d
evolved from a light cduntry-
rock unit to one which, more
often than not, plays good hard
rock. The quintet (Richie Fur-
ay, rhythm guitar and vocals;
Tim Schmit, bass and vocals;
Cotton, lead and vocals; Young,
pedal steel guitar and dobro;
and George Grantham, - drums
and vocals) is still as tight and
professional as any in modern
music. The incredibly s w e e t
vocal harmonies which charac-

terize Poco are just as faultless
as ever, But they have changed.
Cotton is a heavy-handed gui-
tarist, who plays predictable
solos that might have b e e n
programmed by a computer. If
the amplifier mix isn't j u s t
right, his loud playing drowns
out Rusty's pedal steel playing.
Cotton did do a fine job on his
"Bad Weather," with help from
Young and Furay's mellow pick-
ing. However, he canceled out
an excruciatingly long and bad
solo on Poco's final n u m b e r
"C'Mon."
Poco played their usual set,
with a few minor changes. "I
Guess You Made It" led into an
extended, slowed-down version
of "A Man Like Me," complete
with another bad solo by Cot-
ton. At this point in the con-
cert Young's playing was n o t
coming through very well, due
in equal parts to amp trouble
and Cotton's heavy fingers. Next
up was "Ol' Forgiver," a for-
gettable Cotton composition off
From The Inside, followed by
"Hear That Music" and "Hurry
Up," both played without Poco's
usual elan.
The high point of any Poco
CREATIVE
SHABBA T
SERVICE
Every Friday-6 P.M.
at Hillel

concert is their beautiful acous-
tic set, which was somewhat ab-
breviated Friday night. "You
Are the One' stiarted it off to
perfection, with a soaring acap-
pella opening and nice instru-
mental work all-around. George
substituted a tambourine f o r
his drums to enhance the dlap-
See THE CROWD, Page 10
-
,..,15 PA P.R&RsS E
NEW, CRTCAL MiACAZM1E
iN 1( le IN A1Z)V
NR CONTR tYtiOrttS
ARE S0U6IATrW rNFIS
01Wf'OTIC5, eC.oLOGY
CUL.: 1VG FiCTON, NJt'
POC(ErRY. WKITE TVU : NE
WR4P,.2444 ARROWWOD
TRhiL, Pt'J1ARt oR, 4E5O
OIR CN.L &k3iC$4xi3

YI'LAIEI
BOX OFFICE OPEN IN POWER CENTER
Mon.-Tues. 12:30-5:00; Wed.-Fri. 12:30-8:00
Both Season and Individual Tickets on Sale

N

1 !--+---

THE ALLEY CINEMA
PRESENTS
TOMORROW NIGHT-MONDAY, OCT. 18
THE BLOOD OF A POET
1930
Written, directed, settings, montage
and commentary by JEAN COCTEAU.
Along with "Un Chien Andalou," this film is one. of the most
important examples of avant garde cinema. The central char-
acter is a poet who passes through a series of symbolic actions
and metaphoric tableaux. The incidents, effects and symbols used
in "Blood of a Poet" became associated with Cocteau and con-
tinued to appear in his later films, particularly "Orphe.us."
SHOWS AT 7AND 9:30 $1.00
330 Maynard
COMING TUES.-Jean Renoir's "Rules of the Game"
sponsored by ann arbor film cooperative

[ _______
LAST CHANCE
THANKSGIVING FLIGHTS
with reduced airfares

COLUMBIA PICTURES and RASTAR PRODUCTIONS present
BARBRA STREISAND OMAR SHAR-IF
The WILLIAM WYLER RAY STARK Production
co-starring
KAY MEDFORD ANNE FRANCIS WALTER PIDGEONasFlorenzZiegfeld
Directed RR OS MusicbJLE STYNE LyricsbyBOB MERRLL
Based on the Musical Play by ISOBEL LENNART- Music by JULE STYNE- Lyrics by BOB MERRILL
Sreenplay LE NNA Produced A TA Directed A WYLER
Production Designed by GENE CALLAHAN-MusicaSupervision WALTER SCHARF-Miss Streisand's Costumes by IRENE SHARAFF .
Tr- kt ,m i fnD.DAI ? A IIIIIA(NDI /4i I Am)rrIinarNnndtrac humonIoumbima eonrAr l

The Center for Continuing Education of Women
with the Department of Sociology
presents
ALICE ROSSI
Actina Chairman. Socioloav Department, Goucher College

ACADE'JY
AWARD
BEST
ACTR ESS
BARBRA
STRElISAND

via TWA

f Amerian Airlines to:

NEW YORK a ST. LOUISI

I

J

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