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October 12, 1971 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-12

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesdav. October "12. 1971

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

T i 4.1.1\.1riVL t VI:/- I12 171(.

I

Dolmetsch-Saxby: Baroque fun

Marine Band:

By DONALD SOSIN
The Dolmetsch family has
been involved in Baroque music
since 1925, when father Arnold
started an annual series of con-
certs at his estate in England
and was instrumental in reviv-
ing a much neglected genre.
Since then, Dolmetsches have
concertized throughout the
world. Arnold's younger son,
Carl, who even in 1940 was
called by David Ewen "one of
the world's leading performers

on the recorder," upheld the
family name last night in Rack-
ham Memorial, as the Chamber
Arts Series of the University
Musical Society opened its
ninth season.
Together with Joseph Saxby,
Dolmetsch presented an enor-
mously varied and completely
delightful program, in which
the two men played nine early
European instruments between
them. Dolmetsch performed on
five different sizes of recorders,
as well as treble viol and rebec

Russell's 'The Devils':
An allegory of our times

By RICHARD GLATZER
Dude No. 1 Hey man, where've
you been?
Dude No. 2 Oh wow! I've
just had my mind blown !
No. 1: Heavy! How?
No. 2: I Just came from the
Fifth Forum. Saw Ken Rus-
sell's movie The Devils.
No. 1: Good Flick?
No. 2: Wow, was it ever! Told
it just like it is.
No. 1: Far out!
No. 2: It all happened back
in 1634, but as far as I'm con-
cerned, it's 100 per cent 1971.
Talk about an "allegory for our
times"! Incredible! I mean just'
take the scene where they try
to exorcise this horny nun's
devils by tooling around in her
crotch! There's all this blood
and screaming and wow, it's
just like what the male chauvin-
ists are doing to women today,
right here in Ann Arbor!
No. 1: Goddamn!t
No. 2: And this priest Grand-
ier - the crap they put him
through! All these power hungry
priests are out to get him, so
when the horny sister claims
she's been screwed by him, he's
doomed. They punch holes in
his tongue, torture him, an d
finally burn him as a witch!
I'll tell you, when I saw that,
I almost cried, because it's so
true. I mean that's it. That's
what it's all about! Grandier'sy
the only good priest, the only
one who's sincerely trying to
reach God. And through screw-
ing! Right on! But they don't
let him - they know what one
free person can do to a puri-
tanical, totalitarian society!
Fucking Bureaucrats! I mean
, i$ A~ P~o&REsstVE
NPw, cRICAL MKPAzG.
NPXE ..CoMTRBUTIotIS
A~RE S0UrJ1Ar IN FiEUt6
Po t-RY. WRITE TkIs &W
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have you 'ever. seen a film
make a better casenfor liber-
ation?
No. 1: Never!
No. 2: And Russell just throws,
out all these great images! I
mean really heavysymbolism!
Like a skull' with maggots
crawling out of the eyeholes!
It's just like the goddamn poli-
ticians, eating away our .coun-
try from within with their cor-
ruption!
No. 1: Heavy!
No. 2: Or when these doctors
put wasps on a dying plague-
afflicted women's nipples! It's
Nixon bleeding the poor!
No. 1: Incredible! But do you
think the People will realize'
what Russell's getting at? I
mean; will they see all this in.
what might look like a simple
history movie?
No. 2: Hell, this is no simple
history movie! It's all done up
modern: discordant music, con-
temporary-Gothic sets. Russell
even has Louis XIII say, "Bye
bye blackbird," when he kills a
Huguenot dressed as a ,row!
No, even people who aren't into
flicks will know where Russell's
at! You should have seen the
expressions on those people':.
faces when the film was over!
Come to think of it, when I
walked in, the manager told me
that what I was about to see
was "strong stuff." At first I
didn't realize what he meant,
but now I understand. E v e n
that Capitalist Pig knew how
profound this flick is. Russell
just cuts through all the crap.
No. 1: Far fucking out!
For the student body:
Genuine
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' Navy
PEA COATS
$25
Sizes 34 to 5 0

(both ancestors of the violin),
while Saxby stayed mostly at the
harpsichord, except for two
brief accompaniments on the
tombourin, a zither-like instru-
ment used for drum effects.
Drawing from the vast reper-
toire of Baroque recorder music,
the two played sonatas by de
Fesch and Handel, and short
pieces by Couperin, Purcell,
Matteis and Telemann. Dol-
metsch did not seem to be in,
complete control all the time,
but played well, producing a
sweet tone from each of the re-
norders he, used. Especially
charming was Couprein's "Le
Rossignol en amour," featuring
the soprano recorder.
Saxby's keyboard work was
generally precise, although in
his one solo, Kresing's Suite in
D major, some problemsrcrept
in. But these were minor. The
only real argument I would pick
is over the little ornaments
whichehe tacked onthe ends
of pieces. This is fine, up to a
point, but like any-device, be-
comes trite if too often repeated,
which was the case here.
Although primarily a recorder
player, Dolmetsch does play the
viol extremely well, and proved
it in a suite by Louis de Caix
d'Hervelois. This had the tradi-
tional dance movements of a
Baroque suite, as well as a novel
Muzette which sounded like a
radical departure in style from
the rest of the work.
One of the high points of the
concert came in the second
half. Dolmetsch took up the re-
bec, and with Saxby playing a
simple (harmonic pattern on the
tambourin, fiddled (or re-
becced) a 13th century dance
tune with an absolutely stun-
ning fade-out.
The program closed with
three short works by contem-
porary British composers Ed-
mund Rubbra, Nigel Butterley
and. Gordon Jacob.
This morning at 10 the
School of Music is sponsoring a
free workshop by the duo in
Rackham. If Dolmetsch's com-
ments on the program last night;
are any indication, it should,
like the concert, be a lot of fun.
-
DIAL 8- 6416
LAST DAY! X

dead precision
of the military
The United States Marine
Band came to town yesterday
for two concerts at Pioneer High
School, sponsored by the Ann
Arbor Eastern and Western Ki-
wanis Clubs. At the afternoon
concert they chose light works,
and in the evening threw in
some heavier material, if a short
Bach fugue and the fast move-
ment from Tschaikowsky's Vio-
lin Concerto (arranged for clar-
inets) can be called heavy.
As a slick, two hourypack-
aged show, it was great. The
band came onstage, whipped
into a march; the moderator, in
golden tones, heralded the com-
ing of Col. Albert Schoepper,
who led the national anthem
and the Chicago Tribune march,
and we were off, with a litte
Bacharach, George M. Cohan,
and Sousa. The music, with one
or two exceptions was pretty ba-
nal, although the Variations on
a Korean Folk Tune by J.B.
Chance were nice, and one of
Moszkowski's p i a n o etudes
showed up as a virtuoso clari-
net ensemble showpiece.
And from the first it was
clear that the band was top-
notch - always together in at-
tacks, intonation, and dynamics,
but equally clear was the fact
that we were witnessing a form
of military drill; everything had
been rehearsed down to the
split second, number followed
number with only a slight pause,
sometimes amidst applause from
the last work. The moderator
had his spiel down pat, and nei-
ther Schoepper nor his mu-
sicians seemed to show the least
enthusiasm for what they were

LSA
Student--Facuity
Coffee Hour
Meet the Student Counseling
Office people and Course Mart
Committee
OCTOBER 13, Wednesday-3-4:30 P.M.
2549 LSA Bldg. (Deans Conference Rm.)
...:. f-.....-...-.... . . . .

"AN IMAGINATIVE, V I S U A L,
BRUTAL AS S A U L T ON THE
SENSES. A TURBULENT MOVIE
ONSLAUGHT!" CUEMAG21N

A

F

-Dally-Rolfe Tessem

VANESSA
REDGRAVE

'--l .V ',.4 L.. '4
OLIVER
REED

U.S. Marine Band

doing. There was a lot of sound,
but no apparent feeling behind
it, and since that is what mu-
sic is all about, the evening was
wasted for me.
-D.P.S.

w

At corner of
State Liberty
DIAL 662-6264

in Ken Russell's Controversial Masterpiece
Tile y,

pmw

DIAL 5-6290
Today at 1-3-5-7-9
ne
yurm
pO1SOfl
MRS. MIILLER
PANAvISION TECHNICOLOR x
From Warner Bros A Kinney Services Company

MEET GINGER-
Her weapon is :
her body... She
can .cut you, kill ,
you or cure you1 '
COLOR by Deluxe a 7.JUL z ONL;Y
SHOWS TODAY
AT
7:00-9:00 p.m.
STARTS WEDNESDAY
"Hellstrom Chronicle"

I

TUESDAY NIGHT
THE
MAGNIFICENT
AMBERSONS
Dir. ORSON WELLES, 1952
With Joseph Cotton, Ag-
nes Morehead, and Anne
Baxter. The reknowned
director of C I T I Z E N
KANE charts the rise and
f a I I of the American
family.
Short: NEWS PARADE
OF 1956
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
7:00 and 9:05 75c

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A Robert H. Solo-Ken Russellr,. ...s... ,I,,Ken Rusel h.. bitug
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CHECKMATE

State Street at Liberty

THE ALLEY CINEMA
PRESENTS
TONIGHT-TUES., OCT. 12
THE PRODUCERS
Written and directed by Mel Brooks who won the
1968 Academy Award for Best Story and Sreen-
play-Written Directly for the screen. With Zero
Mostel, Gene Wilder, Dick Shown.

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY presents
poco
and
DOUG KERSHAW
FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 1971, 8:30 p.m.
Bowen Field House
and
. JOHN DENVER
AND FAT CITY
SATURDAY, OCT. 16, 1971, 8:30 p.m.
Bowen Field House
ICKETS: AVAILABLE AT:
1.50, $2.50, $3.50 E.M.U. UNION
each show MICHIGAN UNION
ALL J.L. HUDSON STORES

B.B. KING 359 ALICE COLTRANE 59 ARCHIE SHEPP 3 59
In London Universal Things Have

4-"

Consciousness

Go To Change
PLUS--
Ray Charles-
25th Anniversary 7 79
2-record set-only
Chico Hamilton-
His Great Hits
2-record set-only

I

SHOWS AT 7 AND 9:30

$1.00

330 Maynard
COMING WED.--Morley Markson's "The Tragic Diary of Zero
the Fool"
sponsored by Ann Arbor Film Cooperative

V

T
$
fo

Albert Ayler-
The Last Album
-only
Mel Brown's 5th-.

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ISA

YRICO

STEPPENWOLF 59 3 DOG NIGHT3 59JamesGang-Live
For 3 Harmony 3only

Ladies Only

Once upon a time, Gaius Petronius, ARBITER ELEGANTIAE to Nero's court, wrote the world's
first novel, the SATYRICON, now extant only in fragments, and long suppressed or expurgated
in this country until a decade ago. Fellini takes parts of this, and in perhaps his greatest film, fol-
lows two handsome pagan hippies through picaresque episodes in a pagan world-as it was in
Nero's time, and as it may be in ours.
(For an excellent article, see Gilbert Highet's "WHOSE SATYRICON-Petronius's or Fellini's," HORIZON maga-
zine, Autumn 1970, p. 42)

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II

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